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Photo - Help Identify 1929 Studebaker


Peter Gariepy

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From: "Paulo César L Guarino/RF06/SRF"

Paulo.Guarino@receita.fazenda.gov.br

To: peterg@aaca.org peterg@aaca.org

Date: 12/19/2002 12:50 PM

Subject: Studebaker 29

Dear Sirs,

I would like to know the identification of the Studebaker below. It seems that the hood is correct and the paint seems to be still original (but veru bad). I think it is a six 1929.

The owner is looking for the following itens: Headlight lens; tail light assembly; one wheel; original colors options; correct upholstery. Thanks for any help.

Paulo

Lguarino@bol.com.br

stud29.jpg

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It is not going to be possible to identify this car just from this picture. To correctly identify it the owner will need to locate the frame number, cowl number or engine number. Studebaker used chassis/body/engine numbers on all their cars at this time. With any one of these numbers you can go to the Antique Studebaker web site and identify what you got. The site is: http://antiquestudebakerclub.com/identify_your_car.htm

Now from what I see in this picture I can tell the hood is not a Studebaker hood. Studebaker at the time this car was built DID NOT use a hood with horizontal louvers. I don't know what this hood is off of, but it is not a Studebaker. Also, my best guess is that it is an Erskine, built by Studebaker from 1927 to 1930. Reason, all other Studebakers (Dictator/Commander/President) had the belt line that extended all the way across the cowl and along the hood to the radiator. On the Erskine the belt line ended at the windshield pillar. Second reason, on the Erskine the vertical line of the windshield pillar was extended down in front of the leading edge of the front door hinges and swept forward to meet the splash apron. If you look closely you can see the forward sweep of this line faintly in the picture. If, this is an Erskine (pending correct identification with serial numbers) it has an incorrect hood side panels.

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I agree with Mark Huston on his identification of this Studebaker as being an Erskine, However, Mark wrote the following;

"Second reason, on the Erskine the vertical line of the windshield pillar was extended down in front of the leading edge of the front door hinges and swept forward to meet the splash apron. If you look closely you can see the forward sweep of this line faintly in the picture."

This body styling of the door post moulding sweeping down across the side of the cowl only applied to the 1929 Erskine, the 1927 and 1928 models did not have this feature, and the 1930 Erskine was redesigned which eliminated this feature and they went to having a belt moulding which extended across the cowl and horizontally across the hood edge to the radiator shell, like the larger Studebakers. So in answer to the questions as to what this is, it is definitely a 1929 Studebaker Erskine, which came with a 6 cyclinder engine. Compare the below Factory Erskine photos.

Here is a factory photo which shows a 1929 Erskine with the same noticable body design on the side of the cowl;

http://antiquestudebakerclub.com/Erskine_Club_Sdn_for_5.jpg

http://antiquestudebakerclub.com/Erskine_Cabriolet_for_2.jpg

This is a photo of the 1927-28 Erskine without any side cowl moulding;

http://antiquestudebakerclub.com/Erskine_Sdn_01.jpg

http://antiquestudebakerclub.com/Erskine_Cpe_02.jpg

This is a 1930 Erskine, without the moulding on the side of the cowl;

http://antiquestudebakerclub.com/Erskine_Sdn_02.jpg

http://antiquestudebakerclub.com/Erskine_Brm_01.jpg

ASCwebmaster

www.antiquestudebakerclub.com

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I also suspect this car may be a 1929 Studebaker Erskine, but the hood does not look right.

You need the numbers from the frame just behind the drivers side wheel, and there should be a tag on the cowl, just behind the engine. I would suspect that one of the numbers on the cowl tag (body tag) would be a 52.

If that is what it is, I may have some parts you need.

Some better pics would help also.

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Mr George, thanks for your answer. The car seems to be a 1929 Erskine really. I will see the car next month and take more pictures to show to you. My friend asked me about the hood and it is different of the original. May be this hood an accessory?? It is very odd the original owner change the hood (??). My friend says too that the paint seems to be original but very very damaged.

He want to restore the car to original way, including the body colors. Can you help to obtain the original colors combinations?

Thanks again for your help

Paulo

Lguarino@bol.com.br smile.gifsmile.gif

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Thanks Mr Mark too for your help.

Paulo

Lguarino@bol.com.br

The car seems to be a 1929 Erskine really. I will see the car next month and take more pictures to show to you. My friend asked me about the hood and it is different of the original. May be this hood an accessory?? It is very odd the original owner change the hood (??). My friend says too that the paint seems to be original but very very damaged.

He want to restore the car to original way, including the body colors. Can you help to obtain the original colors combinations?

Thanks again for your help

Paulo

Lguarino@bol.com.br

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  • 2 months later...

Well, It took some searching but the hood on that car appears to be from a '29 Peerless Six. the radiator is also very simular to a Peerless. The horizontal louvres were the thing that throws you. It seems almost all cars of that vintage and size had vertical louvres. take a look at this web page.

http://www.autogallery.org.ru/k/p/29peerlessDeLuxeCoupe6cyl3speed1_HW1.jpg

http://www.autogallery.org.ru/k/p/29peerlessDeLuxeCoupe6cyl3speed_HW1.jpg

Dee

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Paulo: You asked why a prior owner would install an incorrect hood onto this car. Bear in mind that this car survived two very trying times for car owners: the Great Depression of the 1930's and World War II of 1941-1945. During these difficult times, car owners became extremely practical, pressing into service whatever parts were available. Keeping the vehicle running was much more important than keeping it original. Also, keep in mind that they were many more makes of cars then compared with now, making location of correct salvage parts more challenging. We can assume that the original parts were somehow damaged, and replaced with what they could find.

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