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Help me identify this car please


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I’ll take a look at a Daniels. Could it possibly be a Locomobile? He had one but this photo doesn’t look like examples I’ve found on the web. What’s really confusing is the front fender doesn’t continue to a running board. I see 2 brackets on the side that almost look like steps. Perhaps he had the running board removed because it was too low for the rough roads around his oil fields?

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Some cars used these step plates because they conveyed an air of sportiness. And notice how their use, plus the absence of a running board, makes the car look more massive and powerful. As for a Locomobile, I own one, and I don't believe this car is one. But I sure would like to own it whatever it was.

 

Ed -- Be sure to fill me in on your Daniels adventure.

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All,

   It is definitely NOT a Kissel. Kissel did not use that style side step plate, nor wheel hub, and the hood vents, typical of a 1919-1922 Kissel Model 6-45 are not there.

   It could be a Revere but I doubt it. The Revere I almost bought was near original and had Buffalo Wheels just like my Kissels and the Revere radiator seemed more massive and a bit sloped as compared to this picture.
   This car has beaded fenders with massive curvature - that wasn’t common after 1920 or so, such that you other experts can perhaps narrow it down. Custom Cunningham ?

    Thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.

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22 minutes ago, ron hausmann said:

All,

   It is definitely NOT a Kissel. Kissel did not use that style side step plate, nor wheel hub, and the hood vents, typical of a 1919-1922 Kissel Model 6-45 are not there.

   It could be a Revere but I doubt it. The Revere I almost bought was near original and had Buffalo Wheels just like my Kissels and the Revere radiator seemed more massive and a bit sloped as compared to this picture.
   This car has beaded fenders with massive curvature - that wasn’t common after 1920 or so, such that you other experts can perhaps narrow it down. Custom Cunningham ?

    Thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.

 

What was the other one that looked like the Revere but had a French name?

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8 hours ago, jrbartlett said:

Some cars used these step plates because they conveyed an air of sportiness. And notice how their use, plus the absence of a running board, makes the car look more massive and powerful. As for a Locomobile, I own one, and I don't believe this car is one. But I sure would like to own it whatever it was.

 

Ed -- Be sure to fill me in on your Daniels adventure.


Jim.......If it turns into an adventure, I will blog it just like the White. I’m on a hell of a streak lately, finding unknown fantastic stuff........can’t buy it all, but I can try!

 

Our average so far this year is 100 percent.......everything we chased down we landed......the run of luck can’t last forever. Usually if I buy one in fifty cars I look at, I think I’m doing fine.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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This is a 1920 Daniels. I realise body, mudguards, wheels etc. are different, but, It is a good comparison for the radiator, bonnet/hood, louvers, latch and side-lamp. I can't find an example of this exact body style, although those sidesteps were used on the town-cars. The wheels are also the same (Rudge).

 

 

daniels.jpg

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6 hours ago, ron hausmann said:

All,

   It is definitely NOT a Kissel. Kissel did not use that style side step plate, nor wheel hub, and the hood vents, typical of a 1919-1922 Kissel Model 6-45 are not there.

   It could be a Revere but I doubt it. The Revere I almost bought was near original and had Buffalo Wheels just like my Kissels and the Revere radiator seemed more massive and a bit sloped as compared to this picture.
   This car has beaded fenders with massive curvature - that wasn’t common after 1920 or so, such that you other experts can perhaps narrow it down. Custom Cunningham ?

    Thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.


Ron, gave your contact info to someone last night with a Kissel for sale.........let me know if he contacts you. Ed

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Craig, I posted that photo today. Your correct, it’s a 1920 Daniels, I have a bunch of other photos of them.

Ed, good, I think we're on the same page here. I was looking for a photo of a Daniels with a Touring body like the O.P., but without running boards.  The wire-wheels and side-step plates on the other cars you posted match the O.P. car nicely.

Edited by Craig Gillingham (see edit history)
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Identifying unknown cars here is like playing the lottery...........everyone wants to be the winner. Its a fun task.........and the car you posted was rare unusual, and very much above average in its day......

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On 10/1/2020 at 10:21 AM, nzcarnerd said:

 

What was the other one that looked like the Revere but had a French name?

 

I remembered the car with the French name - the Argonne. It did look a little like this but I realise it isn't an Argonne.

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Hi Folks,  I checked with our friend Ariejan Bos in Holland who seems very good at sniffing out oddities and he advised: ”  …I did some checking and in my opinion Daniels is correct. The second photo already shows several details which are similar to the mystery photo like hood bracket and handle. On page 158 of the 1920 Handbook of Gasoline Automobiles several details match like louvre pattern, rad emblem, side light. Same wire wheels, which seem to have a D in the middle. The mystery photo however must be a custom version with the steps instead of the running board and the slightly different top style.”

Regards
Vintman (UK)
www.svvs.org


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The steps and removed running boards were a popular fad in 1920 & 1921 on some high end cars.......Cunningham, Daniels, Pierce, Crane......just to name a few. They came and went in about three years. Mostly on auto show cars and custom ordered cars for the fast crowd. The depression of 1921 took care of flashy looking cars for a few years. You see them again ten years later for a short time on many specials. “Everything old is new again.”

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Thanks so much for all the info! And an expert in Holland, even. So glad he confirmed your identification of the car as a Daniels. Great!

 

I'm interested to see that one of you, EdinMass, is a Pierce-Arrow expert. My great-grandfather--the same one in front of the Daniels--toured Europe in his 1911 Pierce and kept a journal of the trip. With him were his two teenage sons and his brother. The itinerary was pretty amazing: his ship from Boston landed in Naples, and from there he drove to Rome, Florence and Venice, made it over Gothard Pass into Switzerland, followed the Rhine River through Germany to Amsterdam, then drove through Belgium to Paris and Le Mans, loaded the Pierce onto a boat to cross the English Channel, toured England, Scotland and Wales before crossing the Irish Sea for a trip around the island. The trip took just over three months. At every stop, he took a photo of the car. When he returned home, he had the journal printed for friends and family. I was lucky enough to find a copy in my father's effects. What a treat! I've attached just one photo so you get an idea. I wish I'd known him.

The Pierce that went to Paris 1911.jpg

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Marjorie, as a historical document, the Pierce Arrow Society would love to publish the material and story in the club’s magazine. Your great grandfather must have been a very successful gentleman, and he certainly had a taste for nothing but the best. His Pierce Arrow at the time would have been considered one of the best cars in the world. If he documented all the cars he owned with photographs, the entire history of his cars and life story would be of interest to all automotive historians. The travel books at that time show a unique snapshot of tourist destinations before they were over run with population and transportation. Would love to see more of his archive. In the world of early American transportation it’s an important resource, and several automotive library’s would be grateful to have the documents for historical reference and scholarship study. Ed

 

PS- with your permission I would like to share the photo above with some Pierce Arrow friends.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Ed in Mass, you can certainly share the photo. I'm in the process of writing a book about the man and his motorcars now, and I would love to put an article together for the magazine at some point. Let me know how to get in touch when I'm ready.

 

The research has been exciting, and I can't thank all the folks who posted answers to my cry for help!

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/4/2020 at 8:48 AM, ron hausmann said:


Ed - no one has contacted me yet. I’m always interested in adding to my herd.

Ron

 

Ron,

You're funny.  Those of us that have the "disease", have a hard time stopping.  It is like the Lay's potato chip ad, "you can't have just one".

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