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For Sale: 1967 Oldsmobile Toronado - $12,700 - Milford, MI - Not Mine


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For Sale: 1967 Oldsmobile Toronado - $12,700 - Milford, MI

https://detroit.craigslist.org/okl/cto/d/milford-1967-oldsmobile-toronado/7200149795.html

Car has recently been rescued from a 30+ year garage stay. All mechanicals replaced or rebuilt, including brakes, lines, fuel lines, gas tank and sending unit, powder coated wheels, new radials, new starter, hoses, radiator, carburetor, etc. Runs and shifts excellent. Bumpers and taillight bezel have been re-chromed. Trunk detailed, engine partially. Interior is excellent except fabric on seats.

Contact:  No phone listed

Copy and paste in your email:  a75734788f12331689b24788d0db93d2@sale.craigslist.org

 

I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this For Sale: 1967 Oldsmobile Toronado.

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6 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Well, Remove it and paint to match.

I've had 4  1966-1967 Toronados and 4 1967-1968 Eldorados.  These were from GM's golden years and although complicated I loved them.  I restored a Dubonnet 1966 including pulling the trans and engine.  I put $5500 in 1997 money into the motor.  The best Mondello had to offer for Toronados.  Rest his soul, Joe himself sent me the list to buy in his handwriting.  

 

This is a nice one, but clearly the fastback top was as much a signature feature of the Toronado as the Eldorado C pillar was for them.  

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Anyone else remember when these cars were first introduced? Of course, the Mustang and '63 Corvette were kind of the styling superstars of the '60's - with many other notable contenders - but the Toronado was really something special.  Many people saw it as what the future was going to look like...and I can't exactly say they were wrong. It wasn't quite "fuselage styling" but I personally think it influenced that trend a few years later with Mopars and GM products alike.  And then there was the front wheel drive. I was only 8 or 9 years old at the time, but I remembered they caused quite a stir.

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Loud and clear James. 

I remember one of my uncles bought a new Eldorado in '68. The car was a knockout but what sticks in my mind most is everyone commenting on the flat floor, it looked so stange after years of drive shaft tunnels. 

As for the '66/'67 Toronado, I remember seeing an ad way back when and it labled the marque correctly as "The car with the science fiction styling".

Edited by GregLaR (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

Why are they all this color?

Old gold metallic was prominent in the sales brochures, results in a high percentage of sales in such as those who find color choice daunting pleased to select what is presented.   Check the number of Continental Mark III's in maroon with a black top, the combination most often shown in the advertising.  

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10 hours ago, B Jake Moran said:

You had me until vinyl top...

 

Jake, my taste is just the opposite.

I like the vinyl top, and favor the '67 styling

with the smooth headlight doors over that of

the '66.  I would want a '67 WITH the vinyl top.

 

Ah, when cars could be designed according

to the buyer's individual preferences!

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40 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Old gold metallic was prominent in the sales brochures, results in a high percentage of sales in such as those who find color choice daunting pleased to select what is presented.   Check the number of Continental Mark III's in maroon with a black top, the combination most often shown in the advertising.  

 

That makes sense, and I was thinking similarly.

Mr. 58, do I recall correctly that you were involved

in a dealership?  Can you tell us a bit more about

what you did?

 

Did dealers tend to order more cars for their stock

in catalogue color combinations?  Or was the selection

also based on what was popular the previous year? 

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12 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

That makes sense, and I was thinking similarly.

Mr. 58, do I recall correctly that you were involved

in a dealership?  Can you tell us a bit more about

what you did?

 

Did dealers tend to order more cars for their stock

in catalogue color combinations?  Or was the selection

also based on what was popular the previous year? 

John S:

I've never been involved with a new car dealership though with a used car operation for about a decade.  The tidbits of knowledgeable about color selection came from a few good articles in collector car publications about how color choices were made for the next model year(s) and what would be the 'leading colors' to feature.  As color selection became more sophisticated as a sales tool, consultations became standard practice with the fashion industry, architects, building material, paint manufactures and professional color consultants as what the future trends were indicating.  The general concept was to be in step with the emergent trends, to make 'hot new colors' available as those became a preference.  Conversely, sales data by color was analyzed to determine colors falling from favor, to reduce or eliminate those from the selections.

 

Another article detailed how the sale brochures were laid out, the important point was the lead image of whatever model that was was in the color considered the best choice to reflect the type of car i.e. sporty, luxurious, etc in the color that, in current parlance' was "trending".   It was intended that a larger proportion of those sold would be ordered in that color or combination and production would plan accordingly.   Color advertising for magazine and television commercials would also feature the car in those most popular new colors.   All this goes to explain why cars like the first Toronados appear so frequently in old gold metallic, dubonnet maroon, white; just as the Continental Mark III were maroon with black top.  As a car entered its third or fourth season, featured colors were purposely changed along with the restyles to maintain an aura of 'newness' and reason to buy.  

 

As a simple question, get a dissertation...

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