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32 minutes ago, Worldwide said:

I have a 1910 Buick model 10 that news a new carb. Will a Ford Model A or Model B work and if so which is more suitable. 

I cant seem to get my Schebler float to seal.

 

Do you need a new carb or just a float? Because people replace floats all the time.

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I have replaced the float with a synthetic one as well as honing out the seat slightly. The float bench tests well but floods when cranked. I had back pressure from a faulty exhaust cage but had that repaired. I don't think there is any back pressure. The solution seems to evade me. any help would be appreciated as I want to keep the brass carb.

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17 hours ago, Worldwide said:

The float bench tests well but floods when cranked.

Based on just what you have reported, the needle valve/seat that is operated by the float needs to be re-seated.  

Lap the needle/seat using a fine valve grinding compound or tooth paste.  Be sure to test the seal with static pressure after re-seating.  

You should also test the jets to make sure they are not cracked.  Remove and suck on each jet with your finger plugging the end to make sure it holds vacuum.  Cracks can be sealed with solder and drilled out after to remove excess solder. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you for your help. It was exhaust valve backpressure. Pin holes in the block near valve cage were sealed and problem solved. I lapped the float needle. Engine starts and runs well now. The oil turns green quickly indicating water contamination. This one has me stumped as the plugs are dry. 

20170510_133012.jpg

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Coolant may be leaking into the oil thru the same type of pin holes in the block casting that were causing your exhaust issues.  Since this is a non pressurized cooling system I would try one of the ceramic block sealers that you add to the coolant.  You can find ceramic sealers at the auto parts store.  

Also I am not sure if your engine block does or does not have core plugs in the oil galley.  You might consider that a core plug in a oil galley may have rusted out and need to be replaced.  Also  you may consider "bumping" your posting to the top of the forem every four of five days until one of the people familiar with your model sees it and is able to offer more specific advice.

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Each of the two jugs should have a coolant jacket drain valve between the pistons.  You can check the color of the coolant in each jug to determine which jug is leaking.  Coolant should be milky if contamination goes both ways.

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Your Knowledge is appreciated. The rebuilder suggested ceramic sealed on start up. I did that yesterday and have yet to see how it works out. I flushed out both drain cocks on the jugs. one had appreciable bits if hard crud. I assume it hadn't been drained for years. I have brass galley on the left side of the engine but that is for oil. I would like to follow up your suggestion re a rusted out core plug. How do I investigate that?

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49 minutes ago, Worldwide said:

I would like to follow up your suggestion re a rusted out core plug. How do I investigate that?

Michael Bernal suggested it.  There are no core plugs in any of the jug style Buick engines I have seen.

 

On 10/2/2020 at 1:56 PM, michealbernal said:

I am not sure if your engine block does or does not have core plugs in the oil galley.  You might consider that a core plug in a oil galley may have rusted out and need to be replaced.

 

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