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The acceptance of electronic versions of the antique automobiles


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19 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

Fast forward twenty years.   Gas stations will be scarce. The vast majority of cars on the roads will be electric. Don't take my word for it, looks at the manufacturers own business plans and industry forecasts. The next generation or two of "car guys" (and gals) will be in a completely different landscape.  We can stick our heads in the sand and ignore it, or we as an organization and hobby can prepare.

 

It's worth a conversation.

 

“The first step in solving any problem is recognizing there is one.”

 

One peripheral question that might seem far -fetched today...but maybe not in the future: IF there are few or no gas stations in the future, how popular will it become to convert '55 Chevies or '56 Thunderbirds to electric power? And, more importantly, how acceptable will that practice be in the view of groups like the AACA? With old suspensions and steering systems, there would still be an "old car experience" to be had with such conversions, but will originality still trump practicality at that point? True, the enormous expense involved would keep many people from making the conversion, but there are many people who spend a lot on old petroleum powered cars today. Interesting to ponder.

 

And, then...what about converting 30's Packards or true Classics?

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5 minutes ago, STEVE POLLARD said:

Here is something that I saw.....

 

 

 

Very cool. And in my opinion, done with respect to the spirit of the original. I'm still not sure I go along with the idea in a general sense, but I appreciate where they're coming from. Something tells me the conversion might be more practical with smaller cars(??)

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For many things that is fine BUT my '12 Jeep has a 600 mile range and can fill up in 5 minutes. I suspect that electrics similarly capable are a way off. OTOH as mentioned in a different thread I have a friend dropping 48v lithium packs from wrecks into golf carts. They are very fast and very popular.

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A guy from Portland has been tinkering with his 1972 Datsun homebuilt electric car since 1994, then racing it at the track where it beats the competing car by a large margin.    Very impressive how it just leaps away from the starting line and the other car looks like its in slow motion.

There are a lot of videos on youtube. search for "Plasmaboy white zombie" and watch a few.

here is one of them.

 

 

This is his website link to the first year version under history tab. 

http://www.plasmaboyracing.com/history/1994.php

 

 

plasmaboy white zombie.jpg

Edited by Oregon Desert model 45
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57 minutes ago, 30DodgePanel said:


Pandering to a moderator is against the forum rules... Section 23 Article 45 ;) 


Not pandering to the moderation.  Section BR, Article 549.

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I get the impression a lot of the motivation of vehicle manufacturers towards  promoting E vehicles are for the sales opportunity. Not to do their part in saving the planet.

It's the battery raw materials that will limit how widespread electric power becomes. As the push for " clean " power generation

intensifies the battery material ; either lead or other higher tech battery materials , will be the sticking point. And electric vehicles

will be in direct competition with power generation for battery material.

A whole lot of money will be spent , but as much or perhaps even more environmental damage will be done.

Great for marketing , but overall potentially putting us all in even worse environmental peril.

Somehow we need to shift from a " bigger is better " mindset to a "less of darned near everything is the road to survival " mindset.

I have my doubts that mankind can make that radical a turn around of human motivation.

 

  

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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I think gasoline will still be widely available in 20 years but maybe significantly more expensive or perhaps a much greater fraction of methanol.  Even at that, will it make economic sense to convert the majority of antique/classic cars?  I suspect not unless it becomes much less expensive to do so.  Also, if the demand for these cars drops as the baby boomers fade away, it will make it even more difficult to justify such a conversion.  

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1 hour ago, Brass is Best said:

No thanks! I don't want one. 

 

 

I don't either, but the point of my question was to try to imagine a future for organizations like the AACA, or at least the individuals who make them up. Knowing the future is not possible, but imagining (or at least contemplating) the future is. It's an interesting question, though I admit maybe not one most of us will face in our lifetime.

 

However, I think it's a somewhat probable hypothetical (at least in the long run): It's 80 or more  years from now and there are maybe only a few sources of refined gasoline in North America and even fewer in Europe. So your choice (or your grandchild's) is to convert your antique car to an alternate/non-original type of power and continue to drive it...or leave it completely original and maybe never drive it again. Not an easy choice.

 

Maybe propane or natural gas conversions will be less unpalatable options for people in the future, as they could potentially leave the original power trains in place. I have no idea if those types of fuel will be more or less available in the future. There may be alternatives to electric.

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And today I saw an infomercial on Lucid Air. Interesting. 500+ mile range. 20 minute 300 mile charge. You decide.

 

Meanwhile I have the ^%%3*5&7^&* Bose radio. Short the front speaker and the rear come on.

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In the early days of the automobile, electric was one of the primary power choices like steam and gasoline.  The gasoline auto was not embraced by everyone and Studebaker was more in favor of electric as seen with this 1905 model. 

9CDB5FC3-9F20-421F-A9A8-A82B24A41B74.jpeg

63878D94-39DA-4F7A-82AA-E884653B1F83.jpeg

AC12FBC4-B9ED-41D4-9BD8-4B5935F26676.jpeg

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3 hours ago, JamesR said:

 

 

I don't either, but the point of my question was to try to imagine a future for organizations like the AACA, or at least the individuals who make them up. Knowing the future is not possible, but imagining (or at least contemplating) the future is. It's an interesting question, though I admit maybe not one most of us will face in our lifetime.

 

However, I think it's a somewhat probable hypothetical (at least in the long run): It's 80 or more  years from now and there are maybe only a few sources of refined gasoline in North America and even fewer in Europe. So your choice (or your grandchild's) is to convert your antique car to an alternate/non-original type of power and continue to drive it...or leave it completely original and maybe never drive it again. Not an easy choice.

 

Maybe propane or natural gas conversions will be less unpalatable options for people in the future, as they could potentially leave the original power trains in place. I have no idea if those types of fuel will be more or less available in the future. There may be alternatives to electric.

 

Since new cars won't be using Gasoline there should be plenty for old cars. 

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31 minutes ago, Brass is Best said:

 

Since new cars won't be using Gasoline there should be plenty for old cars. 

 

Hey, I'm not going to fault anyone for positive thinking. :) I certainly hope that's the case.

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4 hours ago, JamesR said:

 

 

I don't either, but the point of my question was to try to imagine a future for organizations like the AACA, or at least the individuals who make them up. Knowing the future is not possible, but imagining (or at least contemplating) the future is. It's an interesting question, though I admit maybe not one most of us will face in our lifetime.

 

 

I gave up on trying to understand how to rewire a car, so a full electric  is nothing I'll have to worry about in my lifetime. 

 

Bob 

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"The acceptance of electronic versions of the Antique Automobiles,"

the title of the topic reads.  I thought we were going to be discussing

reading our club's magazine on the computer screen!

 

I don't think we'll have anything to worry about in 20 years.

Energy is being found in places previously unknown.

And people today who cherish old carriages and horse-drawn

wagons don't ususally convert them to gasoline, do they?

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I suspect there will always be gasoline available for the diehards who insist on it, although it will be expensive.  I mean, if you can order delivery of propane, you'll be able to order a delivery of gasoline.  Maybe you'll need a few deliveries a year to gas up your 100-year-old Corvette, but it will be doable. 

 

And if not, maybe you'll be able to reenact "The Last Chase" with Lee Majors: 

 

 

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I wonder if ethanol could give us a fuel source in the future. Some old engines may be able to run on a higher blend of ethanol so that if gasoline ever becomes rare, it can be conserved by using it in combination with other fuels.

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to The acceptance of electronic versions of the antique automobiles

Bottom line, its a hot rod.  Only difference is that instead of a $3000 small block Chevy you now have, as one poster indicated, a $60,000 transplant.  Fast as hell, granted.  Only satisfaction is that now all the late 60s 'classic cars' that came with small block Chevy engines as original equipment will be having them replaced with Tesla electric motors.  I think original vehicles, full classics or otherwise, with stock drivetrains or minor modifications (e.g., Model As with hydraulic brakes) will continue to have their own, unique appeal, which cannot be replaced with electronics or other updates.

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I am grateful to have lived in a time of excess and a-plenty. We had it all didn’t we. Unlimited opportunity. Guilt free natural resources and carbon output was unknown to practically everyone. 
 

Times are indeed changing. My old flatheads are sure not efficient. If an affordable electric conversion was readily available I’d consider it. My ‘38 rarely goes beyond 25 miles from home. An electric powertrain would appear adequate. If the car still appeared stock while driving by, even better.  
 

A conversion would have to be $10K or less, and able to be installed here at home myself, to be attractive to me. Perhaps the industry can learn from Henry Ford. Mass production and passed along consumer savings.  Not mass production, meaning manufacturing savings and more profit for the manufacturer. Then charging premium prices to consumers for low quality junk.  This seems to be todays business model for almost everything. 

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