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I AM NEW TO WORKING ON SOMETHING THIS OLD. MY OTHER IS A 47 DODGE PICK UP.   I'VE HAD MANY CHRYSLER PRODUCTS.  THIS CAR IS A CANADIAN CAR AND IS VERY COMPLETE. I HOPE TO MAKE IT AN ORIGINAL SURVIVOR  NON RESTORED AS IT STILL HAS ORIGINAL PAINT. THE WOODWORK IS A BIT SCARY TO ME . I HOPED TO FIND PLANS AND HOW TO,S ABOUT FITTING THE SKELETON TO THE BODY.

THANKS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It is hard enough to find a set of plans for a Model T open car, I would think near impossible for a Dodge closed car. Your only option might be to take lots of photos and deconstruct the body, then depending of your skill set, make a copy of each piece. I would only replace what really needs to be replaced. As far as how to on replacing wood, look for You-tube videos; for example look for videos dealing with Ford Model A 4 doors, maybe Chevrolet sedans. There should be a number of them out there. While not the same, pretty much the same process.

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On 9/21/2020 at 5:38 PM, dwollam said:

If he has a Fisher bodied Coupe it is all wood framed. Attention Nearchoclatetown !

Been away for a few days, Dave. It sounds like Bruce W H  may have a Fisher sedan which would make it the second one I know of. Can you post a picture of the car? A Fisher coupe, like mine is built like a Chevy but larger. A Fisher sedan is I don't know. But I know where the other ONE is and can hook you up. Pull the floor covering up at the right door opening. If a Fisher it will have a number carved in the floorboard with JOB NUMBER. BTW, take your cap lock off, it makes it too hard to read. 

Edited by nearchoclatetown (see edit history)
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The link here is from a current thread on re-wooding the body on an Australian DB touring car.  I think it gives a pretty detailed explanation of what is involved in replacing the wood.  https://forums.aaca.org/topic/316739-19271928-tourer-body/   I guess it all depends on your skills at woodworking.  The contouring of hard wood, sometimes in 3 dimensions, is far beyond my skill level (and patience) although I do enjoy some (simpler) woodworking.  Hopefully it doesn't need all of the wood replaced.

 

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23 hours ago, MikeC5 said:

The link here is from a current thread on re-wooding the body on an Australian DB touring car.  I think it gives a pretty detailed explanation of what is involved in replacing the wood.  https://forums.aaca.org/topic/316739-19271928-tourer-body/   I guess it all depends on your skills at woodworking.  The contouring of hard wood, sometimes in 3 dimensions, is far beyond my skill level (and patience) although I do enjoy some (simpler) woodworking.  Hopefully it doesn't need all of the wood replaced.

 

Shout if you want any more pics or dimensions from this one.  I think it may be quite a bit different as it’s a later model and was also made by Holden (Australia) - there may be some similarities though.

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                  thank you   I will try to get some decent photos this week.  the car is very complete but there is a couple of things to  build.  I am building the throttle linkage from the pedal to the carb now.  Hoping to try a start up this weekend.

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Posting photos is a cinch once you know how....... ;)

In my attached image I have highlighted the lower left corner.

Click on "choose files" which will invoke a popup of your desktop where your photos may be.

If they aren't it's easiest to have them there before you begin......makes finding them real handy.

You can add more one at a time or highlight several and upload them all at once.

 

add.jpg

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That is outstanding that you have a Fisher sedan. As I said I know of one other. Even literature is hard to find for this body style, like factory brochures.  Now the bad news. You will not find any plans for the wood structure for a DB. What you MAY find is some of the wood is like a Chevy. My '24 Fisher coupe is just like a '25 Chevy coupe but bigger. The Chevy is two passenger and mine four so the quarter panels are longer. The truck lid from a Chevy will fit my coupe and has the exact same lock. Compare you car to a Chevy, it MAY be the same. I will notify the owner of the other one and maybe he can supply you some pictures or measurements. 

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Nearchocolatetown was referring to my 1925 DB Fisher Body Coach. I am attaching a photo for you to compare with your car. There might be only 2-3 more of this Fisher Coach model in the 2019 DB Club Roster. 

The Coach was manufactured for only 2 years. 

'25 Dodge Brothers.JPG

Edited by FMF (see edit history)
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When I did my 1923 Moon I purchased several sheets of foam insulation and gluded them together,  I then used an electric knife to cut the patterns.  Cheap and if you overcut or come up short you can just glue the piece back on.  I have a full set of T plans, don't what year but they are available.

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Bruce WH, your car is painted like the brochure shows a Fisher coupe, with a black hood and cowl. FMF has more info then I about the Fisher sedans so he would know. Your car looks pretty good from what I can see. As you may know Fisher was eventually bought by GM and made bodies for them exclusively. You have a fairly rare DB and should be proud. 

Edited by nearchoclatetown (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

Regarding wooden bodies, the most comprehensive manual I could find is FISHER BODY SERVICE MANUAL 1926-1932 ALL CLOSED BODY G.M. CARS which is available new but has no drawings or sketches with dimensions but a lot of photographs. The other used manual I have is BODY SERVICE COURSE 1930 by Chevrolet. This is a 5-day in class body service and repair course. There is a lot more material available for the Model T. There maybe a websites by individuals who documented in detail a Fisher bodied restoration or youtube.

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After reading a bit of this thread earlier today I just came across something that reminded me of this...

on the dodge brothers club website there is a link to “production photos”
Clicked on a few random images and landed on this photo

No idea if this photo is of any use to you but thinking maybe there’s something hidden amongst the thousands of images that could help

this particular photo was “Budd 00569_0001.jpg”

0E3D2D0F-E7AC-4E9D-ADDF-C58C8A9EC709.png

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The pictures you speak of are all from Budd Manuf.  John Parsons, a charter member of the DBC, bought them, about 3600 of them. I scanned them and had them posted. As has been said in other threads Budd made most all the bodies for DB. The Budd bodies were all steel, except for the floor boards. The first wood bodied DB was a centerdoor sedan and the body was built by DB, even has a body badge on the right lower cowl saying so. At least the prototype body panels were stamped by Budd because there are pictures of the parts in these Budd photos that I recognize. There's one waiting for me to get to in my shop. Mine is a 1918 and the main rear section below the rear window has tool marks that it was cut out with tin shears. There's a picture in the Budd photos showing these same tool marks. I know of about 10 other sedans like it. 

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2 hours ago, nearchoclatetown said:

The Budd bodies were all steel, except for the floor boards.

 

Does this mean the sills were still wood (and subject to rot) or just the floorboards?

 

If the sills still were wood, how is replacement done? Is the rest of the steel structure stout enough that you can just lift the whole body up from the door holes or something like that?

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