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WTB: '41 to '47 Cadillac 62 Series Coupe or Convertible Coupe


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Hi Folks:

After a 14 year detour into antique motorcycles, I'm looking for a super nice, no-BS, original or correctly restored '41 to '47 Cad 62-coupe or convertible coupe. Needs to be turnkey or 98% there - I already have 317 years worth of projects on my plate and I want a car that I can enjoy while I'm still alive.

If you have one, or know of one that could be for sale, please message me, or call/text 978.three-oh-oh.24four2.

 

Thanks!
=Adam=

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Thanks @Cadillac Fan. I saw those listed prior to the auction. The green one that sold wasn't in quite the condition that I'd want. I'd consider the yellow one, but have had a few too many expensive and time surprises buying at auction. If I know the car, or motorcycle, then I'm +in+ at an auction. Else, I prefer to deal with a private seller where I can learn about the vehicle and not be under pressure to make a snap decision.

 

=Adam=

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1 hour ago, Cadillac Fan said:

Was the 37-75 in your photo owned in the Chicago area in the 1990s through 2010 ish ?  I remember an article  about it in either the ccca torque or maybe the clc magazine.  
 

 

Yup. I bought the car in 2001 from a guy in Joliet, IL. Super nice car, drove like a dream. It was originally a show car at the ‘37 NY auto show, bought off the show floor. I did a ton of work on it, and sold around 2007. Shoulda kept it. 🙄

 

I have a friend that has (had?) the consecutive serial number car to this one. At the Cad-LaSalle Detroit National Meet  we took lots of photos of the two cars parked next to each other. 

Edited by AdamInNH
Fix typo (see edit history)
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19 hours ago, Cadillac Fan said:

Here is one more

 

 

@Cadillac Fan, good eye. I saw that one, as well. Decent tour car with known history. Been for sale a long time. Fifteen years ago, the seller’s price would have been realistic. In today’s market, the expectation is unrealistic, hence the inability to sell it. An over-the-top ‘47 would sell for $15k+/- more than asking price on this one. It’d take $150k to get this car to that level. That said, tip-top money on this car is $50k, IMO. 

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5 hours ago, AdamInNH said:

@Cadillac Fan, nice scout work! 👍

About 20 years ago, Dick Bury had a ‘38-75 convertible sedan when I was in the hunt for one. He didn’t want to sell it. 
 

This coupe is a nice lookin’ car. The Buicks, too. 


 

1938-75 convertible sedan is on my short-list.  
 

I found an article that says that the 41-62 coupe was restored in 2014.  

 

with no reservation and at Mecum, it might be a very good deal.  

 

 

Edited by Cadillac Fan (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

@Cadillac Fan
I had my eye on it. I had called the dealer that previously had the cars on consignment for over a year. He had that car priced at $70K, which was crazy. He contacted the owner's heirs and expressed my interest. They didn't want to talk with me - I guess they figured they could do better at auction. With the fees they had to incur for transport and commission, apparently not. The dash color didn't look right to me, and the suspension is sitting way high in the rear. I figured that the right number was $35-40K.

Still looking. I have leads on a few cars. None that I am over-the-top excited about, yet. No rush. Winter's here.

 

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35 minutes ago, AdamInNH said:

@Cadillac Fan
I had my eye on it. I had called the dealer that previously had the cars on consignment for over a year. He had that car priced at $70K, which was crazy. He contacted the owner's heirs and expressed my interest. They didn't want to talk with me - I guess they figured they could do better at auction. With the fees they had to incur for transport and commission, apparently not. The dash color didn't look right to me, and the suspension is sitting way high in the rear. I figured that the right number was $35-40K.

Still looking. I have leads on a few cars. None that I am over-the-top excited about, yet. No rush. Winter's here.

 

I did notice the suspension issue.  Wonder if they put series 75 springs in it?  
 

I always believe it is best to sell it at 90 percent of the market quickly and avoid dealer, auction, etc fees.  
 

 

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On 9/21/2020 at 10:40 AM, AdamInNH said:

 

@Cadillac Fan, good eye. I saw that one, as well. Decent tour car with known history. Been for sale a long time. Fifteen years ago, the seller’s price would have been realistic. In today’s market, the expectation is unrealistic, hence the inability to sell it. An over-the-top ‘47 would sell for $15k+/- more than asking price on this one. It’d take $150k to get this car to that level. That said, tip-top money on this car is $50k, IMO. 

Let me jump in here. I'm selling the Lotus Cream Robbins car mentioned above. You've restored in the past? Good. Look at mine last. It's also been generally refreshed a little since those pics, but this is a never hit, never rusted California car. No typical age/rust scars on the suspension and chassis parts, decent amount of documentation and service records, even has most all the hanging tags and owner info pamphlets. So yes, look at and drive mine last, then tell me it's too much. Why do I still have it? 2 people have looked at it, 1 drove it, that's it. I'm not giving it away because lesser cars are selling cheaper. Good cars, truly good cars, are hard to find. This is one of them.

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Do you know what happened to the Robbins V16 or the 1941 Cadillac 62 convertible sedan? 
 

 

the Gernatt family has always had pretty quality cars: 

 

 

https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/af20/auburn-fall/lots/r0005-1947-cadillac-series-62-convertible/841132

 

 

the market is the market.   I guess it all depends on how long you want to own something.  

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  • 5 weeks later...

 Not necessarily.  May be a flipper thinking that there is more meat on the bone in FL.  
 

might even be Mecum themselves.   
 

 

we shall see what it brings.  
 

Both 38 Cadillacs that sold at the same Indianapolis auction for approximately 15k are now publicly for sale for 30k.  
 

 

 

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The deal might have fallen through and Mecum is re-running the car. You know how all kinds of people hit the button on eBay to buy a car then back out at the last minute? Yeah, they show up to in-person auctions, too. They like the game, but they don't really like winning. You'd probably be surprised by how many deals at big in-person auctions fall through.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

That’s my guess. Well, I did try to make an offer on the car before it went to the Indy auction. The PO’s heirs apparently had big ideas as to value, looks like  they still do. If they’re wise about it, they would have accepted the $35K this time, paíd the commission and moved on. Next go around, I’d be surprised if it gets to the current bid. 
 

In other news, there are a few cars I’ve looked at, paid for remote inspections and appraisals. I’m picky and if the car has stories or other accompanying BS, I am not interested. 
 

I’ve expanded my search to include:

‘37 to '38 Cadillac 75 convertible coupe or convertible sedan
'46 to '47 Cadillac 62 club coupe/fastback
'40 Cadillac 75 convertible coupe
'33 to '35 Pierce-Arrow 8 club coupe or club sedan
'31 to '34 Chrysler club coupe or club sedan
'36 to '37 Packard Super 8 club sedan or convertible sedan
'40 to '42 Packard 160 or 180 convertible sedan
 
The right car is out there. I’d love to have one that I could put into good order for this coming season but, I’m in no rush to find it. I’m a ready buyer when it does come along. 
Edited by AdamInNH (see edit history)
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I am guessing that there was not a bid at 35, just fishing for a sale.  No bites.  Interesting, as the 38-75 sedan had the reserve taken off at $25k, and was bid to $50k for a sale at $55k. 
 

 

There was a 38 75 convertible sedan on Craigslist in Southern California.  Looked like a low 3 condition as far as I could tell.  That might be generous. Was running.  Asking $40k.  Looks like a lot of work, but a great car.  
 

 

There is a 37-75 on the clc Potomac regions website.  Also, if you expand your search to 1940-75 convertible sedan, check out the horseless carriage club website. 

 

good luck!

 

Edited by Cadillac Fan (see edit history)
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I need turnkey, so if the car needs more than a month of fettling, it ain’t for me at this point. 
 

I known the 37-75 for close to 20 years, belongs to a friend. That one and my old one are one chassis number apart. A nice car, for sure. 
 

Yeah, that ‘40 convertible. I know the car, saw it where it was stored in a damp barn in New York, July 2001. I have lots of pix and correspondence. This is the only pic I could find without digging. The interior of the car looked like the center for disease control, back then - mold everywhere and on everything. There was also a ‘35 cream and black convertible Cad and a bunch of other neglected stuff in that barn. https://www.amazon.com/photos/shared/BIo7KYvrRkiycoml0dIlaA.T6j3TRw_4vxDhkR6W9B5u1

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If it is the same one that sold by BJ in 2016, it must be very nice.  That sold for $110k.  
 

It is my belief that a fresh, correct 1940-47 62 convertible, properly restored to achieve high points in clc /ccca judging is a $100k car.  
 

But a nice “#2” is about a $60k car.  
 

It is no reserve.  My guess is hammer at $80k, sale at $88k.  
 


 


 

 

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21 minutes ago, Cadillac Fan said:

If it is the same one that sold by BJ in 2016, it must be very nice.  That sold for $110k.  
 

It is my belief that a fresh, correct 1940-47 62 convertible, properly restored to achieve high points in clc /ccca judging is a $100k car.  
 

But a nice “#2” is about a $60k car.  
 

It is no reserve.  My guess is hammer at $80k, sale at $88k.  
 


 

Here's the sale from Barrett-Jackson, https://www.classic.com/veh/1940-cadillac-series-62-convertible-8325106-en8G2A4/. It's the same car. I'll agree - in the the $75-80K range. 

 

 

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Market...Market...Market Who gives a steaming pile of fecal matter what the "market" may or may not be when you simply want the RIGHT car? All this babble about costs and restoration, well what's the going rate for a proper Jenkins leather interior kit for a Model 62 Cadillac? back in 2011 the whole gig was just under $17K, now mind you that was before you picked up the wrench to turn the 1st seat bolt to start installing. Anyone ever done one of those? It's not exactly like stretching seat covers on a Mustang. With avg labor rates nationwide hovering at $80-125/hr (some way more) who wants to take a stab at how much a full interior would be "out the door"? Anyone? How about a top? Easy? YOU do it and get back to us (professionals excluded). Let's throw another talking point out there. Show of hands, where are 'premium' cars going in the next 2-4 years? Anyone? Who remembers this "MARKET" (oh that word again?) back in 2011-12-13? I sure do. Why the lull over the last few years? I guess if you account for how well your 401Ks were doing from '17 thru '19 this should answer itself. But hey what the H-E-double toothpicks do I know? I've only spent a lifetime watching and living this life. 

 

Here's the punchlines for all those still playing. I sold my personal Texas born 47 conv back in the early 90s for $37,500. I was told I was crazy then too. Why did I bring up the interior. Because out the door you'd be close to if not over $30K by the time you turned the key to leave the shop, tears of pain included for some. Show of hands, who's done a full chrome job on a 41-47 Cadillac lately? "Oh but Highlander that doesn't matter, doesn't make the car worth more because blah-blah-already done and blah-blah- I'm only here to take advantage of the fool that spent that money in the 1st place and blah-bloviate-blah-blah-blah." End of the day, go ahead and buy inferior stuff and maintian the idea that THOSE represent the "MARKET" (dagnabbit, that word again!) vs what a premium version will net in reduced maintainence, restoration and general expense as well as good ol-fashioned longevity. So you buy an exceptional vintage Cadillac conv for $60K and drive it for 5 years. What's it worth? I drive a stunning 2015 Cadillac CTS Performance Collection. Sold new for almost $64K and had less than 55K miles on it. Got it for less than $24K, but I didn't get the memo that it also works that way for the vintage collector cars too. If this sounds angry or hostile that's on you who think so. Every once in a while SOMEBODY has to step up and push a reality check. And while sometimes it seems all well and good to use auction results as a barometer because they're the most public, then I invite you to go to the next "good one" and look at the cars. Look hard, bring a pro if need be. Check for mud, seat alignment, excess copper build up on chrome parts, panel fit, paint flaws, door edge thickness, then factor in that without advance notice and qualified permission you WILL NOT be able to put 25-10-5, even 1 or 2 miles test drive on that car. How's the brakes? Does it pull to one side at speed? Run hot? Full warmed up oil pressure? If it's a stick, how's the clutch? Shift ok, does it grind? Where did they add the silk and lipstick on some of those "pigs" to walk the model runways for 2 min and generate an acceptable sale price? Like I said above, SOMEBODY has to push a reality check. Prove me wrong, I welcome it, and I did all this for the benefit of my fellow car guys. Hope at least some of you took it that way. 

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Who cares about the price you get when it goes to the right owner?  One who will keep it for years and years and will show it at many ccca and clc events.   This is the RIGHT buyer who deserves the car.  Let him have it for half. 


who cares if you can get more from someone else.  This is the right buyer.  You should be willing to take less from him. 

 

Also, think about how much it cost me to restore this car.  I chose to do it and now I must be make whole.  I don’t care if it takes 8 years for me to realize that will never happen. 
 

Gooding sold  a 41 convertible sedan in 2011 got $140k.  The same car sold for $50k in the last year or so.  The “market” for these cars informs buyers for all of these cars even for the top quality ones.  Sorry but you can only ask so much if you want any action. 
 

while I love flathead Cadillacs, I am part of a dwindling group.  Less people are interested in these entry level classics that in the 90s.  That is just a fact. The top of the ccca market seems fine, but the sub $100k is not.  

 

Not wanting to over pay doesn’t make one less of a car guy, just as dumping 300k into a 75k car make you more of one.  


good luck with the sale. 
 

https://www.conceptcarz.com/profile/11735,8708/1941-cadillac-series-62.aspx

Edited by Cadillac Fan (see edit history)
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https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/hf18/hershey/lots/r0115-1947-cadillac-series-62-convertible/720795

 

$88K out the door in 2018. The defense rests, but I did inspect this one as suggested above. I was there. I'd park mine right next to it and wouldn't hang my head a 1/4 lower than normal. I want a new Escalade, a 2020, and I want it for 60% of 'A' plan price. I'm "the guy" that has to have it for that price. I'm the right guy. I deserve it. I don't care what the avg retail or plan price is. 

 

So sarcasm aside, tangible things like condition, history, documentation, performance (drive quality), overall aesthetics, presentation, all of it matters. When you look at a frame from a New England or Midwest car and see all the scars and pitting from decades of rust vs a California car that never had it, is there a value difference? If there's no filler or body repair vs one with even good repairs done, yes? No? If the chrome isn't washed away with excess polishing or copper build up does it matter? Does every repair ever done by the previous owner from a simple oil change to full brake job and all the supporting docs add value or are they meaningless paper just to push a narrative? How about the GM sales record from 1947. All of that before you get in, turn the key, hit the starter, and away you go. No worries, just hit the road. Not worth a dime less than the avg "whatever" cars? You see that's what seems to be missed here. I don't owe anyone a profit. I'm not a wholesale house for amatuer flippers. I'm not on a 'picker' show helping Frank or Mike get ratings. I'm offering an above average example of one of the most desireable Cadillac conv models of the era. Right color, right car, right paper, right price. Then again it may not be right for Jumpin Jimmy's Discount Classics. I was told my 47 Super Clipper was only worth $12,500 on a good day too. Got MY number out of it and the buyer was shickled titless. This stuff's a lot easier than some think, logic and reality is your friend.  

 

And glad to see you inserted the "...nobody wants em..." argument too. But wait, there's more. Dig through the annals of customized cars. No less than a 1/2 dozen very professionally built 46 and 47 Cadillac convs have hit the scene in the last couple years. Lowered, later overhead engines like 49 thru 62, candy paint, padded tops, all tastefully done to a level that the most hardcore Cadillac guy would admire whether he had the stones to admit it openly or not. Another market or just a stupid idea? You decide. Thanks for playing...

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On 1/30/2021 at 4:33 PM, Cadillac Fan said:

Not wanting to over pay doesn’t make one less of a car guy...

 

I agree, Cadillac Fan, and I appreciate reading your

helpfulness to the original poster on this topic.

 

I have known people from all walks of life.  To illustrate:

One man I know has had an annual salary of $30,000,000

and a total annual income undoubtedly higher.  I told him

of a car for sale I thought he'd like.  His very first question

was, "What's he asking for it?"

 

No one ever became wealthy by spending inordinately.

If one has the money, it's best to be modest at the same time.

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