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For Sale: 1957 Lincoln Capri - "Same family since new" - Sparta, TN - Not Mine - 10/7 More Pictures


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For sale on Craigslist:  1957 Lincoln Capri 4-Door Sedan in Sparta, TN  -  $25,000  -  Contact James:  931 644  86 zero nine

 

Link:  https://nashville.craigslist.org/cto/d/sparta-1957-lincoln-capri-very-rare/7186162910.html

 

Seller's Description: 

1957 Lincoln Capri 4-Door

  • condition: excellent
  • cylinders: 8 cylinders
  • odometer: 31000
  • transmission: automatic

1957 Lincoln Capri. Same family has owned car since bought new in 1958. Garage kept. Original car. 368 Y block, 4 barrel carb, 3 speed turbo drive automatic. Factory color, automatic headlight dimmer, auto lubrication system. Original wheels and hub caps. Very slick car. You need to see it to believe it.

 

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Edited by 6T-FinSeeker
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  • 3 weeks later...

The Seller has also listed on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/319293692833793/

 

Contact the Seller through the Craigslist phone #: Contact James:  931 644  86 zero nine

 

Seller's Description:

1957 Lincoln Capri 4-Door Sedan

Exterior color: Turquoise · Interior color: Grey

 

Additional pictures:

 

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Image may contain: car and outdoor

 

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Edited by 6T-FinSeeker
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  • 6T-FinSeeker changed the title to 1957 Lincoln Capri - "Same family since new" - Sparta, TN - Not Mine - 10/7 More Pictures

I can't tell whether this car is a 4-door hardtop

or 4-door sedan.  In these years, Ford deftly styled

their sedans to look just like hardtops when the

hardtop's windows were rolled up.

 

A 1957 Lincoln 4-door hardtop is very seldom seen.

It is probably 10 times rarer than a 2-door hardtop

or a convertible of the same year.  I'd be happy to

own a 4-door hardtop.

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  • 6T-FinSeeker changed the title to For Sale: 1957 Lincoln Capri - "Same family since new" - Sparta, TN - Not Mine - 10/7 More Pictures
8 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

I can't tell whether this car is a 4-door hardtop

or 4-door sedan.  In these years, Ford deftly styled

their sedans to look just like hardtops when the

hardtop's windows were rolled up.

 

A 1957 Lincoln 4-door hardtop is very seldom seen.

It is probably 10 times rarer than a 2-door hardtop

or a convertible of the same year.  I'd be happy to

own a 4-door hardtop.

John-S

The percentages by body style for the 1957 Lincoln Premieres and Capris break down as follows:

Two door hardtops: 44.2%

Four door hardtops: 30.5%

Four door sedan: 15.9%

Two door convertible: 8.9%

 

The four door sedans have the heavy chrome upper door frames and rear door vent windows; the hardtop slim chrome window frames and a heavy angled upper chromed door member.

'57 Lincoln Premiere Landau front.jpg

'57 Lincoln Premiere Landau rear.jpg

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Many cars that were produced in large numbers

are seldom seen today:  The population of old cars

is wildly distorted by collectors' and restorers' 

preferences.  For example, Lincoln Mark II's are

extremely common despite their very low production:

There are often 10 to 15 for sale on the Hemmings

website alone at any given time.

 

I wrote an editorial on the commonness of once-rare cars,

and the rarity of once-common cars.  When I checked,

1960's Lincoln convertibles had a grossly distorted

population, too.  Now, they are much more available than

Lincoln sedans, while when new they had a population

only 1/10 of the sedans.

 

Certain models are becoming rare, and no one notices.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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36 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Many cars that were produced in large numbers

are seldom seen today:  The population of old cars

is wildly distorted by collectors' and restorers' 

preferences.  For example, Lincoln Mark II's are

extremely common despite their very low production:

There are often 10 to 15 for sale on the Hemmings

website alone at any given time.

 

I wrote an editorial on the commonness of once-rare cars,

and the rarity of once-common cars.  When I checked,

1960's Lincoln convertibles had a grossly distorted

population, too.  Now, they are much more available than

Lincoln sedans, while when new they had a population

only 1/10 of the sedans.

 

Certain models are becoming rare, and no one notices.

 

Absolutely true!  You noticed this too!

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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

The population of old cars

is wildly distorted by collectors' and restorers' 

preferences.  For example, Lincoln Mark II's are

extremely common despite their very low production:

There are often 10 to 15 for sale on the Hemmings

website alone at any given time.

 

 

I second the notion that this is a very good point.😃 Although the initial year of Thunderbird greatly outsold the Corvette, first generation T-Birds sales were pretty dismal compared to the second generation 4 seater T-Birds. Everyone supposedly hated that the T-Bird changed and got larger in '58, but the sales indicated just the opposite. I think I've read that the '58 in one year outsold the three previous years combined. But how many first gen. T-Birds are for sale online or at Hemmings? A LOT. My guess is that they were bought  - either new or used - as more of a specialty car and were used less as everyday transportation, and so a relatively high percentage survive. Don't know if that's true, but that's my theory. I see more of them for sale than the second generation. I'm also guessing that the last gen. of T-Bird - also a two seater - is rarely seen in salvage yards.

 

Love the Lincolns, both green and tan. Thanks for posting.

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There are several other factors at play with the early T-Birds. They have been popular from day 1. Owners kept them on the road longer than the typical 50's family car. Almost 30% of the cars were sold in California, meaning a lot more of those cars survived due to the lack of salt on  the roads. They were great looking cars when new and still are today. They photograph well from all angles. They have a great parts network today. It is true that the 1958 4-seater car outsold the 1957 by about 15,000 units, mainly because its seating capacity appealed to more buyers. That is why the original Mustang hit the streets as a four passenger car. 

As the original American personal luxury car, the early T-Bird checks all the boxes.

Lew Bachman

1957 T-Bird Colonial White

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The first instance I recall of the higher-priced, lower production models become more commonly found as collector cars versus the higher production line-mate were the 1940-'48 Lincoln Continental cabriolets compared to the same model years of 1940-'42 Lincoln-Zephyr and 1946-'48 Lincoln convertibles.  The proportions have now probably reversed from the original production numbers, especially for the postwar models.  The Lincoln Continentals were in high demand  even as used cars, the LCOC started in 1953 so people prized them from the start, much as they did the Continental Mark II, giving it a high survival rate.

 

In the 1970's, the 1960's four door convertibles were being collected as an inflation hedge, plus recognition they would be the last of their type produced.  Many even rusted convertibles were saved that would have otherwise been junked.  The sedans were regarded as common and too many were used for parts for convertibles, making finding good sedans more difficult now.   

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2 hours ago, 1957Birdman said:

There are several other factors at play with the early T-Birds. They have been popular from day 1. Owners kept them on the road longer than the typical 50's family car. Almost 30% of the cars were sold in California, meaning a lot more of those cars survived due to the lack of salt on  the roads. They were great looking cars when new and still are today. They photograph well from all angles.

 

Hey, thanks for the education, Lew. I didn't know that about California sales, but it makes sense - the culture and the car seem to go together. I totally agree with you on the first generation's great looks. I love them. I can honestly say that I don't think I've ever met anyone who disliked the looks of the first two seat Thunderbirds. Nor have I read articles by anyone who didn't think they were beautiful. It's hard to get styling right more than that.

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