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1931 Series 66 - Comments Please


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So I'm finishing restoration of this exact model and I paid the asking price of the one you are looking at for a partially restored incomplete car that needed a lot of work.  The Craig's list car here looks to be very complete and has wire wheels.   I have a car buddy who is an AACA member/contributor who has one of these cars, same model, 8-66S, that has never been apart.  He has been an invaluable resource as I try to make my car complete and authentic. his car and mine have artillery wheels.  If you are interested in one of these cars grab it.

 

These were great cars. In 1931 Buick discontinued all their overhead valve 6 cylinder cars and brought out 3 series of inline overhead valve 8's.  50 series cars had open drive shafts, 221 cu in 8 with single barrel Marvel updraft carburetor and heat control systems that made 77hp.  Early 50 series cars transmissions were not synchronized but they got that later in the model run.  50 series cars had single servo brakes and headlight wiring was housed in stainless flex-armor conduit that exited the bottom of the headlamp housing and passed thru the side of the radiator shell.  50 series cars were 114" wheelbase. 

 

60 series, like this car, had 272 cu in engines with Marvel 2 barrel updraft carburetor and heat control systems, held more oil and coolant and made 90hp.  Transmissions were synchro-mesh.  These cars were 118" wheelbase, had duo servo brakes and torque tube drive (enclosed driveshaft).  Headlight wiring for these cars was enclosed inside the headlight stanchion tubes. 

 

80/90 series cars had same engine architecture but were bumped to 344 cu in and had 104 hp.  80/90 also had syncro-mesh transmissions with dual disc clutches where 50/60 cars were single disc clutches.  80 series cars were 124" wheelbase, 90 series 132". 

 

I'm still fascinated by the engines in these cars, beside being overhead valve they all had roller tapped cams, dual point distributors, oil temp regulators, all gear drive generator/water pump/distributors radiator front shutter water temp control and the fan belt drove, well, the fan, exclusively, and the fan hubs have oil reservoirs with stand pipe filling arrangements.  When these cars run properly they are very smooth and quite powerful for their time.

 

Let us know if you decide to move on this car, I'd like to keep track of it.

 

Dave

 

https://forums.aaca.org/topic/309205-my-1931-buick-project-the-saga-begins/

 

Edited by Str8-8-Dave
Corrected 50 series wheelbase to 114" (see edit history)
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Gee- it's quiet here...  C'mon everybody- cheer the man on to buy the car LOL...

 

On a more serious note the one item I did notice is missing from this car is the windshield regulator board and inside rear view mirror.  These cars had crank-up windshields with a regulator knob on the left side of the car above the windshield and the mirror mounted to the center of the board.  to the right of the regulator handle on the bottom edge of the regulator board there is a nickel plated slotted bracket that the windshield wiper motor control handle hangs down from.  If you get serious about this car ask the seller if he has these parts.

 

 

 

 

Wshld 0056.JPG

 

 

Wiper 0040_LI.jpg

Edited by Str8-8-Dave
Correct text, add picture (see edit history)
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You kind of said it all Dave.

https://duluth.craigslist.org/cto/d/duluth-31-buick-special-sports-coup/7188193116.html

But generally, what was true nearly 90 years ago is still true today — you’d have to spend a whole lot more money to buy a better car than these Buick’s.

In most cases that would be only a marginally better car. There’s a reason Buick has the dedicated following it does in the pre-war world.

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Thanks Ben for adding a good link. I've been off the laptop for a couple of days.  Guys I like the car but am generally out of the hobby and if I were to jump back in i probably could not secure funds fast enough. Maybe.  There is a 1931 series 90 coupe for sale and posted under the Not Mine section for $25,000 and has been for a year.   Closed cars in the $20k range seem to not be selling.  

I think $20,000 is a lot to spend on a collector car but when I retire in 13 years it would t seem as bad.  But I'll be 70 and then not much time to enjoy the cars.  

 

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On 9/19/2020 at 5:44 AM, Str8-8-Dave said:

50 series cars had open drive shafts, 221 cu in 8 with single barrel Marvel updraft carburetor and heat control systems that made 77hp.

Only the early 50 series had open drivelines; about half way through the year they all had torque tubes.

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You could not ever get a rust bucket of that vintage into the condition that the seller has with that vehicle.   $25,000 is about 50% or less of what it would cost to pay someone to restore the car.  If someone is in the market for that model car then the price is a good price for the buyer. Problem is how many potential buyers are out there that desire this particular car?  

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17 hours ago, BucketofBolts said:

You could not ever get a rust bucket of that vintage into the condition that the seller has with that vehicle.   $25,000 is about 50% or less of what it would cost to pay someone to restore the car.  If someone is in the market for that model car then the price is a good price for the buyer. Problem is how many potential buyers are out there that desire this particular car?  

It has been noted by some members who are into the 20's and 30's or earlier, that the market is shrinking for these cars.  

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