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GARAGE ADDITION IN NORTHEAST PA


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We have been planning the garage addition for the past year and last week was the ground breaking for the actual construction. We needed to have other work done near the site in preparation for the addition, which started a few months ago and has been on going.  The existing garage is 26 ft wide  and  28 ft deep.  The addition will be 40 ft wide and the same 28 ft depth. It will be a reverse gable to the current garage with two 10 ft x 7 1/2 ft doors.  The plan is for a 4 post lift in the future and to accommodate the extra needed height the addition floor will be 7 inches lower and scissor trusses will be used over one of the bays.  Between lowering the floor and special trusses this will pick up  about 46/47" in overall height at the center over the normal 8 ft height that the existing garage is.  The garage door track in that bay will also be a special order and will follow the contour of the scissor trusses. Here are some pictures from the initial phase of construction.  Will update as the addition starts to take shape.020.thumb.JPG.f466e790917366fa19e3bbb8c89bf75b.JPG

Existing garage.  Addition will be to the right side.

 

 

Starting to clear land.

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Looks like easier digging than we had even with the boulders. I wonder if I ever got a full bucket of just dirt.   Back filling was interesting,  digging through all the rocks to find some clean dirt to put against the wall.  I told the wife this summer that loves swimming if we ever put a pool in we will pout it out front and just build up as going down is too hard.

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Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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Sounds like a lot of creative thought went into the plans to achieve the needed height measurements etc. Look forward to following, thanks for sharing here.

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We had our share of rocks and boulders,  but you have us beat.   

Yes, between mine, a friend,  and the contractor's ideas, I think we came up with a good way to be able to fit a lift.

Here are some more pics.

 

Photo 1....... Rebar set in the footing trench.

 

Photo 2.......Pouring the footers.

 

 

 

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It's always nice to see that concrete finally in the ground.  Makes you feel like it's really going to happen.  PA is far enough south you should get atleast an extra month of workable weather this fall over where we are in upstate NY.  That's a nice bonus as well.  I finished mine up and put the lift away in a snow storm last year.  That was in the beginning of November. The bottom fell out after that.  I think it was below freezing or very low 30's for most of the rest of the month.

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Estimating completion in about 4 weeks. Siding material is on order and is due in on 10/9. We shall see.  But here are few more pics of the progress.

 

Block delivery

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Three courses of 10" block set.

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Two courses of 8" block plus another course on the back wall for about 20'.  This extra course on the back wall was needed to keep the back

fill away from the siding.

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More progress being made.

 

 

Shale for the new driveway.  The stone and cement trucks will help with compacting. 

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Stone truck with conveyor.  Very cool, have never seen this type of truck, but it has been around for awhile.

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Business end of the truck.

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The other end of the conveyor dropping the stone for under the cement.  6 1/2 trucks were needed to bring the floor up to grade.

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Stone is compacted and expansion joints laid in.  Vapor barrier will be put down when the floor is poured.

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Pressure treated sill plate and cement form at the doors have been added.

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Back fill is just about complete.  Will need another load or two of fill to give a nice slope all around the building.

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The floor pour is scheduled for Monday 9/21. 

 

 

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You are making good progress.

I have never seen stone done that way,  but boy it sure is quicker than dropping it in a pile and spreading it around with a machine. I spent atleast a day with my laser and tractor and excavator spreading mine.

Wish I had been able to do it that way. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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Yes it was interesting to watch.  The cement for the floor will be done the same way. That is why we have to wait till Monday for the pour, the truck will not be available till then.  There was very little hand grading done.

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Some places don't allow floor drains unless you put in a full septic system for them.  That's the case here.  They are afraid I'm going to pollute the lake.  I'm about 5 miles from the lake on the other side of a granite mountain and I'm on the bottom back side of that mountain. 

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There are drains in the original garage and we were planning on doing the same in the addition. Connect the 2 building and make just one outlet.  If we kept the addition under 1000 sq ft it would have required only a permit. But it is 1120 sq ft and requires multiple inspection, and the inspector saw the outlet in the original garage and made us close it up.  We did not inquire about what would be needed  to make it legal. I am guessing it would be along the lines of what AUBURNSEEKER needed to do. So no drains in either building.

 

I am planning on a movable 4 post lift which does not get bolted down. Therefore the concrete will not be thicker under the lift legs.  The concrete will be 4 1/2" which according to the lift manufacturers I contacted will be ok to support up 8000 lbs, because it will be distributed over 4 posts.  A stationary 2 post would have been a completely different scenario.

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As noted by Lamar..... make the concrete thicker where you intend to install a lift. 

you can probably get by with normal thickness on a 4 post but I would want about 6 inch if going with a 2 post. 

Around here,  they form walks and driveways with 2 x 4 and say you are getting 4 inches ....we all know a 2 x 4 is only 

3 1/2 inches and if they leave any humps in the base you have less than that in thickness.

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On the drain . They would probable want just a grease trap if you bring it out to surface and not dump in storm sewer with you probable do not have .

  And the floor thickness is not for the weight of lift and load . It is for holding the  anchors . I would do minimum 6 "  pad in those areas . The drilling and driving anchors will be much easier and allow for opp's .

 I know this because ,I help a friend cut holes next to his leg where driving anchors broke bottom out. We then hand tunneled over to nut /bolt a plate . And patch floor . Next time he would do nothing less then 8" . Of coarse he did mumble something about never again  LOL!

Edited by ArticiferTom
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Hi all,   If I were putting in a 2 post lift there is no question a minimum of 8" of concrete would be under the posts.  However I am planning on a 4 post that has removable casters so it can be moved.  This will be helpful if I am using it for storage for a small car or plan on working on one of the sedans, the lift can be pulled forward closer to the center of the building to give more overhead room.

As for the drain, the garage does not have running water so closing up the drain is not a big issue. And pulling a hose about 200 ft is not my idea of fun.  LOL

 

 

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The concrete pour went as scheduled.  The conveyor truck brought in 11 yds  and   the front end dumper brought in the rest , 5 yds.  The pour started at about 8 AM and they were done with the power float at about 3 PM.  Three guys did it all.

 

Good shot of cement on the conveyor belt.

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A few more pics

 

 

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They will be back today to cut the joints.   Lumber delivery is scheduled for today  and  framing will start tomorrow.    I have to remove the siding on the existing garage, on the wall that the two buildings will share.  It is still in good condition, just a little faded from the sun.  I plan to use it on the shed.  The original thought was to replace the        T1-11 siding with the same,  but I think this might be a better choice. Plus there is leftover from the house  and  the existing garage just sitting in the garage rafters.

 

 

Shed that needs repair.

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I hear a truck,  got to go.

 

Thanks for all your interest.    Jim

Edited by ILIKECARS53 (see edit history)
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Some progress made on Tuesday  9/22.

 

Expansion joints cut005.thumb.JPG.ebb969ae431ced8590ebe465814986af.JPG

 

 

 

 

Siding, fascia, gutters, etc removed from the common wall

 

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Lumber delivery

 

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Had a few issues......

We have a spring feed well.  Since the summer has been so dry we have to watch our water consumption.  Cleaning the slurry off the concrete from cutting the joints used a lot more water than I thought.  Ran the well almost dry.  Just started to get some water out of the faucets this morning, but with more air than water. Going to have to wait another day or two to really be able to use the water.  Bought some gallon jugs of bottles water yesterday, we needed our coffee this morning.

 

When the lumber truck emptied the LVL's, they hit right on the edge of the concrete and put a nice size chip.  Needless to say the contractor was not happy  and  neither was I.  He ripped into the company and I am not sure of the outcome.

 

Framing will start today.  Will keep you all posted.   Thanks   Jim

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Lumber company delivered the wrong roof sheathing.  Was supposed to be 5/8"  CDX plywood, instead received 5/8" OSB.  Packing slip was for the plywood.  Supposed to be here tomorrow to exchange.

 

Trusses are being delivered tomorrow.

 

 

 

Here is a picture of the damage caused by the LVL's.  Just a chip about 4" long, but annoying. 

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Front wall framing with some of the sheathing nailed  in place. Two  7 ft 6" X 10 ft garage doors.

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Side wall framed and completely sheathed.

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Outside view of side wall.

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Back wall framing with window framed out.  Window is about 30" X 42".   Some sheathing nailed up.

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Tomorrow's plan is to finish the sheathing,  set the top plate, and do the truss layout.  Although the trusses will be delivered tomorrow, I am not sure when hey will be set.  

The water situation has improved a little, but will need to wait another day or two, before we have some pressure.

Thanks for the interest.   Jim

 

 

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Good day yesterday.  All wall sheathing is done.  Wrap applied.  Top plate is in place.  Getting ready for trusses today.

 

Front wall.

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Side wall

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Back wall.

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30 trusses delivered.

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Correct roof sheathing delivered.    They picked up the 5/8" OSB at the same time.

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Over all view of the existing garage  and  addition.

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As I said, the trusses will start to go up today.  There 30 trusses total.  9 scissor, 19 full bottom chord,  and 2 sheathing trusses ...... one at each end.  Contractor was trying to get a crane for today, if not will set by hand.  I offered my help if they will be set by hand.  An extra set of hands wouldn't hurt.  Have to cover the cars that are in the garage are covered.  Once they start to walk on the existing roof debris will fall inside.

 

We are supposed to get some rain within the next day or two.  We need it, still having a domestic water issue.

 

More photos as the work continues.  Thanks for viewing.  Jim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I'm wishing now I could have put my floor in when I built mine,  but with all the other expense and paying out of pocket as I went.  I just didn't have the extra 30G.  We were also cramped on time.  I'm not sure we could have gotten it poured in time and set enough to work on as we finished up in the snow.  They got the shell up and sheathed and it snowed that night.  We cleaned that off,  they put the roof on and it snowed a foot that night.  That didn't ,elt until Spring.   Atleast you won't have to worry about that with your project. 

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52 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

Wow, moving right along! How may are  in the crew?

The smaller the crew the fast it goes. The GC who built my garage said he used to have a crew of 5-10 on his jobs. Until he figured it out. A crew of two, father and son, did my job quickly. And I don't even think they said a word to each other.

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If you get a chance and don't mind please add some prices each phase cost with sizes and types of material.  It helps others trying to get a handle on cost to see what it really cost to put up a garage.  You can rough estimate when trying to figure out,  in the planning stage,  but as we all know seems the final total comes out alot different. 

I did it on my thread when I could.  Even rounded off numbers are helpful.  I know I scoured all over the web when I did mine and few had detailed threads with usable information like that and sizing for what you could really put in the space you were building. I ended up laying out my footage then using a scale model car i had of a real car I owned to see how it would fit in that space and be able to maneuver in it. 

 

I just found some very nice man doors at Home depot that are fiberglass and you would swear they were real mahogany even upon real close examination for not much more than the primed doors I bought that are not even in the same neighborhood of quality.  After painting and having the paint lift off my grilles,  I wish I knew of these as I would have bought them instead.  I even told hte wife if the paint gets much worse, they are coming out and I'm going to buy four of these. 

Stuff like that is helpful to others building if you run across anything you found that is superior.  

 

Good choice on the Plywood over OSB.  I did the same.

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1 hour ago, auburnseeker said:

as we all know seems the final total comes out alot different. 

I was mature enough to understand my contractor had to make a profit on the job. I had a very good idea what the going prices were and I knew I was asking for extra. So, when the contract price came out reasonable I just signed. Some are out there with the "sharp pencil" mindset and have to beat every nickle they can out of the job. Bragging rights, I guess.

My perception of a garage and the basic structure were different and it showed as we progressed. An apron at the overhead door was not standard, or a mandoor, and, when I asked for better quality windows, they were delivered the next day. I had allowed enough profit in the agreement to let him absorb those extras. He still made money and I got what I wanted. I have seen a lot of those stubborn hagglers over the years. They don't often have those smile lines in their face or a happy little twinkle in their eye.

 

I got in trouble early on doing an "in house" construction project. An equipment supplier asked if I wanted design estimate pricing, which I took and used. That was about 60% of the actual cost. When I was in the sewer up to my eyeballs from under estimating he told me that was the standard. Full pricing at 100% in the design stages could have shown the project to be too costly and dropped. I have a couple of lists. He is at the top of one.

 

Bernie

 

Oh, one other thought,  if a crocked contractor is caught overcharging by an honest customer, the contractor will use the honest customer's price estimate as an alternative price. He knows the honest person's due diligence was accurate. And he will "talk to those estimators who made the mistake back in the office".

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

I'm wishing now I could have put my floor in when I built mine,  but with all the other expense and paying out of pocket as I went.  I just didn't have the extra 30G.  We were also cramped on time.  I'm not sure we could have gotten it poured in time and set enough to work on as we finished up in the snow.  They got the shell up and sheathed and it snowed that night.  We cleaned that off,  they put the roof on and it snowed a foot that night.  That didn't ,elt until Spring.   Atleast you won't have to worry about that with your project. 

 

The weather has been great.  We have had a few chilly mornings, low 30's, but by mid day has gone into the 60's.  And no rain so far.  However they are calling for rain over the next few days which is ok.....   we need it.   I will be posting pictures of the trusses a little bite later, but you will see the last 2 trusses not in place.

Did not realize we were short shipped 1 truss, which will be delivered today, and the gable end post at the existing garage side.  To set the gable end truss the existing garage overhang has to be cut, which will let rain get into the garage.  So we will wait for the rain to pass before doing this.

We should be buttoned up in about 2-3 weeks, ahead of any wintery weather.

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17 hours ago, MrEarl said:

Wow, moving right along! How may are  in the crew?

For the most part everything has been done with 2 or 3 people. 

Setting up the site, digging for the footing, and setting the rebar  .......   2 people    1 day

Pouring the footings  ..........  3 people    1 day

Setting the block  .....  3 people.     2 days

Pour the floor ........  3 people.     1 day

All wall framing, wall sheathing, and wrap  building ......  2 people   2 days

Set trusses  ........  4 people          sheath gable end and and overhang framing  .....  3 people        all in 1 day         Pics to follow.

 

It is basically a 2 person company but has third come in when needed.  Setting the block was done by a different company, that my contractor uses.

For setting the trusses.......  the fourth person was me.

 

Thanks   Jim

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The first quote was based on 28 ft x 36 ft addition.   This was  $28,000.   But this included the structure, shale for the driveway, top soil (not fill) for around the building, and the stone to raise the floor.  These three items I estimate to be about $5000.

 

Then we changed the size to 28 x 40 and this added $3000.  But again more shale, top soil, and stone for the floor.   Maybe $2500 for the building  and  $500 for shale etc.

Then we went one step further to get more head room for the 4 post lift.  About $1000 for the addition course of block, special trusses over one bay (10 trusses), 7 ft 6" garage doors (instead of 7 ft doors)  and  the special door track to follow the scissor trusses.   For a total of $32,000.

We added a window in the back wall and do not have a price for this yet.   Maybe another $200.

 

The construction details as follows......

Footings........    2 ft wide    8" thick     with 3/8" rebar  2 rows

Block........   3 courses  10" block      2 courses  8" block   plus  another course of 8" block on the back wall for 20 ft to handle the grade in the back of the building

Anchor bolts ...... every 4 ft

Sill plate ........  pressure treated 2 x 8  

Concrete floor   4000 psi mix      4 1/2" thick  with vapor barrier

All wall framing   .........  2x6    16" on center

Wall sheathing   ........    7/16"  OSB

Trusses .........  16" on center

Roof sheathing  ......... 5/8" CDX plywood

 

TO BE CONTINUED        JIM

 

 

 

 

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That's the one problem with building at every phase it's only a little more to go bigger or better.  When you look at it in the grand scope most changes are 1 to 5 percent of the overall cost so it's so easy to justify.  The problem i found is I ended up going a little bigger or better with almost everything so it probably added more like 20-30% to the total project ,  but again when finished,  I'm glad I spent it.

 Still stewing over those doors.  Boy I wish I knew about them before.  

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I am back......   to continue with the construction details.

 

Ice dam membrane at the overhangs  and  valley where the new and old buildings meet.  With synthetic underlayment everywhere else.

roofing shingle.........  architectural to match the existing garage

Siding........  vinyl to match the existing building.  Depending how well the new vinyl matches the old vinyl on the front gable and wall, they may get resided with new vinyl.  This will be an extra that was not included in the price.  it will be totally up to us when the time comes.

 

I think that just about covers everything for the construction details  and  costs.   Thanks  Jim

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8 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

That's the one problem with building at every phase it's only a little more to go bigger or better.  When you look at it in the grand scope most changes are 1 to 5 percent of the overall cost so it's so easy to justify.  The problem i found is I ended up going a little bigger or better with almost everything so it probably added more like 20-30% to the total project ,  but again when finished,  I'm glad I spent it.

 Still stewing over those doors.  Boy I wish I knew about them before.  

I know exactly what you mean.  My girlfriend, Holly, took the checkbook away from me.  LOL

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Here are the pics from the work done on Friday 9/25.

 

29 out of 31 trusses set  and  I helped.

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Scissor trusses in the first bay.  The height at the center is 12 ft 4".

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Full chord trusses over the second bay  and  work area.  Ceiling height is 8 ft 11"

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Gable end sheathed and wrapped.  And overhang framing done.

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Depending on the weather the roof sheathing is scheduled to start on Monday 9/28.  If it rains it's ok, we need the rain.

The overhang on the common wall will not get cut off until a few nice days are in the forecast, so rain does not get in the existing building.

 

Will keep you all update.  Thanks for the interest.  Jim

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