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American in South Africa


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Hi Folks,

 

Would request your help again please. Have received photo in UK concerning Grandfather in South Afica with a number of American cars. This one has stumpped a couple of our experts as not very much to really see!  A hole centrally in the apron and quadrant on the steering wheel. No door handles. Louvres look vertical. As door is open, quite visible dashboard. RHD !
 

Any Suggestions Please?

 

Regards

 

Vintman (UK)

www.svvs.org

2 - 1920s early to mid.jpg

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I was confused by the stripe just below the top edge of the body. I thought at first it was a 'ridge' but maybe it is just a pinstripe - as found on some restored examples?

 

I see no sign of a gear shift lever so maybe it has the right side shift which was available for right hand drive cars in this era. Although I don't know for how much longer.

 

This 1917 car is in NZ. It has a locally built touring body and right side shift.

 

Yes that is frost on the ground.

 

 

 

 

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I have a 1918 Buick and before reading any of the comments on this picture I zeroed in on that line running across the top of the body and thought it eliminated Buick because it seemed to vary in width - which I presumed was caused by shadows meaning it was probably a ridge or body molding which 1917/1918 Buick’s did not have.

After reading the comments (boy you guys are good) I took another look and thought that line could be a paint stripe. THEN I zeroed in on the visible steering column and thought, “Well that’s nickel plated - that eliminates Buick.”

Well, that plated column must be a variance related to the right hand drive because every single other detail tells me it’s a D or E (1917, 1918) 45 Buick - 6 cylinder. The lone external rear door hinge, the hole (or cap) in the center of the apron - that is without doubt a Buick.

Now, whether it’s a 1917 or 1918 I cannot tell. The 1917s had perfectly vertical windshields while the ‘18s had slightly slanted. My eyes can’t pick out that detail in the blur of this photo.
 

(A couple of photos found online. The second photo -the unrestored car- is the larger 7 passenger car wich has a steel panel running behind the front seatback.)

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Edited by Ben P. (see edit history)
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The right hand drive cars are McLaughlin's ; or at least McLaughlin built, so lots of small trim differences from Buick. They were possibly badged as Buicks depending on the marketing arrangements in particular export markets. Nickle plated steering column is normal on a McLaughlin. 

And it probably has right side shift like the red NZ car above. The single , lower rear , exposed door hinge is a give away . I can't think of any other car that has this arrangement apart from 1918 - 21, 5 pas. Buicks / McLaughlin's.

 

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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The other way to tell a 1916 / 17 from a 18 or later is the shape of the rear door. 1916 / 17 had a slightly shorter wheel base and the rear door has a cut away curve for the rear fender curve.

1918 and newer have the full rounded rectangle rear doors and the single exposed hinge

 

Greg

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Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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