Jump to content

How much has your taste in cars changed over time?


Recommended Posts

I was recently looking through a box of stuff from my childhood when I found a drawing of an antique car I had made when I was probably in 8th grade (just dreaming up a car, not based on an actual vehicle) .   I had to laugh, as the drawing looked almost exactly the same as the antique car I actually bought last year.   Same era, same look, same body style.  I now have the drawing up on the wall in my garage next to the car.   It made me realize that my taste in cars hasn't really changed since I was a kid.  

 

I wonder if that's common, or if your taste in antique cars has changed over time.  Or for that matter whether you weren't interested in antique cars before but are now.  Are we all just chasing the dreams we had as children, just with more money and a valid driver's license?  

 

 

Edited by 1935Packard (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1935Packard changed the title to How much has your taste in cars changed over time?

I still like the same things. But I like a great many more things then I used to like. Today I like some cars from every era. That wasn't the case 60+ years ago. Today I'm not chasing anything, just enjoying my cars and sharing other people's cars with them.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 1935Packard said:

I was recently looking through a box of stuff from my childhood when I found a drawing of an antique car I had made when I was probably in 8th grade (just dreaming up a car, not based on an actual vehicle) .   I had to laugh, as the drawing looked almost exactly the same as the antique car I actually bought last year.   Same era, same look, same body style.  I now have the drawing up on the wall in my garage next to the car.   It made me realize that my taste in cars hasn't really changed since I was a kid.  

 

 

 

 

Soooo, you're going to tease us with your drawing from the past that has remarkably proved to be a sign of the car you would buy later in life.............and not share a picture of that drawing with us????

 

This topic caught my eye immediately because I too have changed through the years.  I think taste in cars can be a little like taste in foods.  What have you been exposed to?  Who has come into your life with a passion for a certain type or genre of cars that you previously didn't know much about?  

 

I grew up in a pretty small, blue collar/farming town in Indiana, I'm 55 years old.  My father had no interest in cars other than as a way to get from point A to point B.  He bought what was a good value, and didn't think much about them.  My close childhood friend's dad was into collecting cars and that is where the itch started for me.  I began as a kid really liking a lot of the mass produced stuff from the 60's.  Cougars, Rivieras, Starfire, basically touring muscle.  I liked the 50's and in our town, you'd see a few 50's sedans and a few of the tri-five Chevys.  Also several Ford Model A's.

 

Many years ago, I became close friends with some British car guys.  That friendship made me look deeper into really all non American cars from England, Germany, Italy, back to the 30's.  It gave me something to study and research......two things I love. 

 

About 5 years ago, I found myself looking at and reading a lot more about the Classic era of Cars.  Mainly American makes.  I have yet to pull the trigger and buy anything from that era, but I have been doing a lot of studying and dreaming (too much my wife might say) and I know my next purchase will reflect that.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

My mind has not changed any, when I think about it.  What looked ugly when it was new still looks ugly today.  Styling touches that I hated in the 1960's and '70's when the cars were brand new have never 'grown' on me.  I hated them then, and still hate them now. 

 

I have a 1963 Studebaker G.T. Hawk I will be restoring eventually that has the single rear antenna on the trunklid.  I thought it disgraced the look of the car in 1963, and still do today.  When I restore it, and hopefully locate a rust-free trunklid for it, I'll be going to a conventional stock left front fender location for the antenna.

 

Craig 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great idea for a post (of course in socal less of a concern but this would have been ideal to keep us talkin in January... 😊 ).

 

I have always been drawn to the Classic era, including non Classics in that mix.  I also recall drawing a couple of town car style cars at 10 or 11.  56 now.  As an early teen I picked up an interest in sports cars, mostly Brit stuff.  I recall really liking early MGs due to the combination of styling and sportiness.   In HS and after I did the ponycar, muscle car thing, as well as tri five Chevies. 

 

Interest took off even more watching the restorations of friends dad's A roadster and his 39 Chevy.  A friend's mom had a signal red MB pagoda I loved also.  These cars were influential for sure.

 

My interest today is mainly Classic era stuff, inc. Non Classics, Full Classics, Fords.  Postwar sports cars with some others thrown in from each decade.  Traditional hot rods, well done. Surely I was influenced by interests as a younger fan.

 

I personally think the stretch from 29 to 34 yielded the most attractive cars but all decades hold some interesting vehicles.

 

As Seeker listed his cars over the years I will do same for fun:

 

1941 Plymouth (age 14, fun fun!)

Camaro, Chevelle, Corvette, more or less used cars at the time, but still toys.

1956 Chevy 210

1948 Chevy coupe project

1973 Triumph TR6

1939 Chevy sedan

Long dry spell, 15 years typical family, career focus.

1930 Model A tudor

1968 Olds Cutlass S vert

1939 Packard 120

1914 T speedster project

1989 MB 560 SL current

1930 Model A roadster current

 

Never drove the two projects, the T ran well but not roadworthy.

 

Cars I might like:

 

MG T series

Any of several Full Classics

Model A pick up 30 - 31

Model A slant sedan 31

Traditional hot rod 28 - 32, ideally 28, 29 roadster

 

We'll see..

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT
More stuff! (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine has expanded.  I’ve liked the 1920s and 1930s early on and now I enjoy more cars in the time frame up in to the early 1960s.  Even a few select 1970s cars are creeping in.   As to what I would want to own and drive that gets difficult as looking at and driving are two different things altogether.  I can see driving a 1940-1963 car in today’s traffic over an earlier era car.  I have a lot of interest in 1950s cars as that's the era I grew up in.  My early drawings were dirt track race cars as that was my main interest back then.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was really young,  I would say between 5 and 10 I liked anything that was 10 years older or more than me,  so anything from about the mid 60's back was interesting as they were quite a bit different than current models and living in the Northeast,  few 20 year old cars were on the roads so you weren't exposed to them.  I really liked all the chrome on 50's cars,  and with Dad getting a bunch of car mags, with one being a classic car mag that I can't remember the name of, I was exposed to Duesenbergs Auburns and such.  I really liked those,  especially since I never saw them in the flesh even at shows we went to,  which were few and far between. 

I would say I hit my teens and really liked hot rods,  but not conventional hot rods,  I liked traditional hot rods with the 40's -early 60's (pre all out crazy show rods) It merged the older cars with the 50's vibe I liked. I still have stacks and stacks(pretty much a pretty complete collection) of all the early rodding and customizing magazines.  Maybe part of the alure is all those guys were trying to turn their cars into what the full classics were.  Take a Model A or 32 Ford and streamline it,  make it look racy,  add a little power and when you are done you have a 3/4 Auburn on a budget.  Think about some of the most desirable early coachwork and alot of early hot rods emulate the look with lower roof lines streamlined fenders etc.

When I hit mid teens and time for a license,  i picked up my 56 Olds.  That would be 1991.

Mostly stock,  I added a (completely reversible ) custom grille and that was about it. (still have it in the garage)  I've had bone stock originals right along with hot rods.  Drove an all stock 35 Chrysler Coupe while I was building my 32 Hiboy cabriolet. 

Finished that and as much as I like it,  find myself in the last 15 years,  really gravitating away from anything modified. (maybe the rat rod craze and years of sifting through what looked like good cars all torn apart and hacked up but never finished on craigslist caused it)  I also picked up a greater appreciation for 40's and stock 30's cars.   Of course lately chatting with my friend that fixes all the hot rods people build and problems they create for themselves has helped cement that modifying is not a good option on many cars.

The last few years I find myself dipping back into the teens and 20's and drooling a bit over some older iron.  Of course I'm still a sporty roaster open car man and not crazy about most sedans,  so maybe it's still that spirit of youth from my early days hanging in there. 

Here is a little list and a sampling from my computer. Lots of others in the mix but these are a nice cross section. 

1956 Olds Circa 1992

1932 Ford Hiboy that I built Circa 2003, car finished in 1999

1957 Tbird Circa 2005? Of course the Olds is in there as well.  It was a husband wife trip up to store the Olds for the winter.

1948 Chevy Circa 2009

1960 Fuelie Corvette and 1948 Plymouth circa 2014?

1936 Cord 810 circa 2014.  Picture is more current.

1947 Hudson Circa 2016

1931 Auburn. Circa 2020

IMG_2509.JPG

IMG_5990.JPG

IMG_6000.JPG

IMG_2515.JPG

IMG_6005.JPG

IMG_2187.JPG

IMG_0569.JPG

IMG_1447.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

1.  Ages 5-14    Classics and Exotics:  Duesenberg & Lamborghini,  1930s & 1960s.

2.  Ages 15-35  Musclecars:  GTO,  HEMI, Boss 302, Shelby Mustang.

3.  Ages 35-55  Classics Again,  30-36 big cars,   Mercedes 540k,

4.  Ages 55+   Steam Cars, Pre 1930 unique, big horsepower brass, anything I haven't been staring at for 50 years.

 

Still and always liked 41 mopar business coupes, 53 halo cars,   S3 Chevelles with the 454,  77-79 W72 Y82 TA,  1980 Z28 with the 350/4speed, 69/70 AMX.  40-42 Willys

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Before had a driver's license I used to wander in parking lots. Two struck me as being particularly beautiful: a 3/4 size 57 Caddy with suicide rear doors, and a HK-500 Facel Vega. I still think the same but not on my bucket list. Over the years have bought six new cars for myself, four to race and two tow cars. Still have one.

My first car and one I learned wrenching was an XK Jag with a Moss gearbox. Taught me how to shift non-syncho gears and a love for DOHC-6s. Always feel best with a removable roof. Still have Whitworth wrenches.

70's were muscle cars and Corvettes I could race (still have the Judge). Same with Corvairs.

'80s to 00's were the 3800 years. Sill have the 88 Reatta.

'10s was a retractable phase, still have two SLKs. Also acquired current DD and tow car, both DOHC-6s.

And this year acquired two 89 (IMNSHO the best year) Allantes - nice one to drive and not-so-nice one to learn. As usual did not plan that way.

And am out of space/license plates.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Im 56, when I was a kid I had always liked the early cars 20's-30's, still do. Early teens was into street rods as my older brothers had hot rods. I thought the late 50's were the ugliest of all eras. 60's and 70's were still contemporary and didnt mean a whole lot other than transportation, though I had always liked the early firebirds and camaros. My taste now is in restored as original, any old car. I love them all. Not too crazy about street rods now and could care less about rat rods, though I do appreciate the work that goes into some of them. Of course my favorite is a second gen T/A😁

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hrmm, interesting question.

My eyes have always preferred cars with the radiator above or behind the front axle (where it belongs), but I questioned my sanity a few years ago when I happened upon a photo of a 1973 Olds 98 like the one my mother had when I was a kid and shuddered when I thought it was kinda pretty. 

 

I recall being taken to the Henry Ford for the first time - spent the whole day drooling over all those old cars (my grandmother still claims it was a problem extracting me - I don’t remember that) and then I remember vividly returning to that 98 in the parking lot and wondering why the world went so wrong. I was probably 3 or 4.

 

As I’ve gotten older I appreciate any nicely kept ‘old’ car. Though I’m probably not in any danger of losing my mind and buying a ‘73 98 because I’m pretty sure they all rotted off the road by the mid 1980’s. Until that photo I hadn’t seen one in 35 years.

 

(Now there’re probably going to come out of the woodwork.)

35B8B885-625A-42C4-A30D-FFD238257B13.jpeg

Edited by Ben P.
typo (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. Shortly after he retired from Fisher Body about that time I remember my grandfather stopping at a railroad track on the way to church. Open freight cars loaded with steel body stampings were on their way to Fisher in Lansing and he pointed at them and said, with tears just about in his eyes, “Look at all the flash-rust on those body panels - they’re just going to paint right over that. That’s the way they’re doing it now.”

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it began with a green Mopar when I was 16. A 1976 Dodge Dart. Life carried on. While I was busy raising a family and paying the bills, I liked all sorts of cars. I knew I wanted to get into the old car hobby when the time was right. Fast forward thirty years. Today I own 2 old green Mopars.  I'm inquisitive and want to learn. I'm frugal and like to save money. I am determined to do my own repairs and maintenance. I like teaching others and passing along knowledge. I like meeting and associating with people who are into the old car hobby. My old green Mopars check off a lot of the boxes for me. The green ones seem to find me. I'd surely enjoy a different color Mopar some day.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5850.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have changed a lot, and I even know the exact minute that I changed totally. Growing up I was in to hot rods and muscle cars. I didn't give a look to anything 73 or later and I didn't even consider nonAmerican cars as real cars. (Except Volkswagen Beetles, due to the Herbie movies, which I loved as a kid)

 

Eventually, as the 70s and 80s cars I grew up with disappeared, I became nostalgic for them and now I appreciate all cars, from all eras...even some foreign cars. 

 

I switched from hot rodding to factory stock when I saw a Terraplane that had the usual 2000s trope of being chopped, no windows and painted flat black. It was nauseating. I have preferred factory stock cars since that day in 2009. I'm not as purist as some...I don't mind a set of Cragars on any 50s through 70s car, and for the most part I don't know what the factory colors were so I don't know if it's correct or not. As long as it looks right then I don't know the difference. 

 

The 50s are my favorite cars, probably always will be, but I love the concept of cars, any self propelled vehicle really.  The more exposure I'm getting to 20s cars the more they are taking up prominent space in my mind as well. 

 

I will photograph pretty much anything and everything that shows up at a show, though, even things I don't like. I didn't photograph that Terraplane, which is the biggest insult I can give to a car show participant. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be 70 in December, the Ridgefield meet with its 1942 cut off date sealed in stone what I like in old cars. There are some choice pieces, cars and trucks up to 1956 that I now admire. Finishing what I have should be the goal now. Bob 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Ben P. said:

Yep. Shortly after he retired from Fisher Body about that time I remember my grandfather stopping at a railroad track on the way to church. Open freight cars loaded with steel body stampings were on their way to Fisher in Lansing and he pointed at them and said, with tears just about in his eyes, “Look at all the flash-rust on those body panels - they’re just going to paint right over that. That’s the way they’re doing it now.”

 

Well that might explain our 1973 Delta 88 developed holes needing to be repaired by 1975!!  Ran great though..

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Well that might explain our 1973 Delta 88 developed holes needing to be repaired by 1975!!  Ran great though..

My 1973 Chevelle SS, first new car I ever bought, had the disappearing metal issue too.  I had it repaired several times and it still kept rusting.  By 1977 it was replaced with a new Chevy Rally Nova. It too had some issues with paint and rust but nothing like the Chevelle.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was young in Minnesota the cars, mostly GM, that were just a few years old that had rust holes I thought "I would never buy one of those".  I never had a 50 - 57 Chevy, Buick, Pontiac but I did own a 57 Cadillac.

My favorites have always been late 1930s back to the high wheeler s.

The worst looking car styling wise I had was a brown 4dr 1962 Plymouth, most of the 80s cars had no styling.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Yep we put up with several rusty late model GM rides in those days.  Kept 73 monte carlo off my car list, not a collectible but, the distinction of worst car I ever owned in every way...  😨

Hopefully the Monte had swivel buckets like my Chevelle, at least they worked!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, 28 Chrysler said:

The worst looking car styling wise I had was a brown 4dr 1962 Plymouth, most of the 80s cars had no styling.

Actually the next car after my 77 Nova was a 1983 Camaro Z28, red of course!

6E16584A-CF30-4FE5-B9E0-D5D49EDC975D.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know that my tastes changed as much as they evolved based on outside forces. I was car obsessed back to my earliest memory of sitting on the fender of our 1930 Model A while my Dad changed the plugs (around 1951). Prewar cars were my first interest in toys and car models and I was seriously into models from age 10 until I started driving. These progressed from straight prewar to 50s to customized cars to race cars, some even after I was driving. My taste in real cars was based on what I was used to and what I could afford - 50s and 60s Fords, then Mopars and Oldsmobiles. I was a car flipper early on to finance my project cars so I worked on a wide variety of makes. The muscle car era bit me big but I could not afford any new ones so I bought and fixed a bunch when they were 3-6 years old and before they had much value. I had a FWD Toronado and Eldorado "period" falling in love with their styling. As I got older and had more disposable income I finally got some prewar cars with varied degrees of satisfaction and currently I am into original cars only. I still have an impossibly long list of cars I would like to own but it does not include any sports cars, pony cars, or foreign cars.  

DSCF1651.JPG

DSCF1653.JPG

DSCF1703.JPG

DSCF1706.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

My taste in cars hasn't really changed much.

I remember drawing 20's style cars as a kid and trying to draw my Dad's Rickenbacker or my Grandfather's Pierce.

Antique cars have been in the family longer than I have so I grew up in 20's and early 30's cars.

Back then 50's and 60's cars either used cars or new cars so there wasn't too much of an attraction when I was really young.

But once I started driving I really started to like the pony cars of the 60's and since my parents held onto the '64 Malibu SS hard top they bought new, I started to really like Chevelle/Malibu cars.

That is when I started to really want a '64 Malibu SS convertible.

I have always loved the look of open cars and I loved riding in my uncle's '24 Chrysler roadster, the feeling of being out in the wind as you drive along.

My Dad was the opposite, he never like open cars, he always loved sedans or coupes.

In high school I got to spend a summer driving an uncle's '74 TR6 and I loved it.

Rowing through the gears with the top down and that intoxicating exhaust note was pure heaven for me.  I didn't care that there were plenty of faster cars, the TR6 just felt like nothing else I had ever driven.

I guess the only few blind spots I have are the late 30's through early 50's cars and most of the though I am finding them more appealing as I get older and the late 70's cars.

When I was a kid I never dreamed I would one day own my Dad's Rickenbacker and my Grandfather's Pierce but I am very proud to be this generation's caretaker.

There are so many family memories wrapped up in those cars that I could never part with them, no matter the price.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I started off with a 1941 Cadillac 60 Special Fleetwood when my parents were driving 1931 Cadillac's - they quickly latched onto my car and sold theirs, and eventually ended up with a 1935 Auburn 851 Phaeton - they quickly latched onto my car too and again sold theirs.  Now, I have a 1936 Auburn 852 Phaeton.  And all the umpteen cars in between did not stay around too long as they were too big, too small, too complex, drove worse then a truck, were not interesting, had no speed, and ....  I really like 1929 to 1932 car, but most have disadvantages on the road (lots of glitz though).   There is room is in the garage for a Ford GPW, a really neat pre-WWII MG or ..., a Cord L-29 or perhaps an Auburn V-12, and perhaps something else in a Close Coupled Sedan or another Convertible Sedan, and ....

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

I started off with a 1941 Cadillac 60 Special Fleetwood when my parents were driving 1931 Cadillac's - they quickly latched onto my car and sold theirs, and eventually ended up with a 1935 Auburn 851 Phaeton - they quickly latched onto my car too and again sold theirs.  Now, I have a 1936 Auburn 852 Phaeton.  And all the umpteen cars in between did not stay around too long as they were too big, too small, too complex, drove worse then a truck, were not interesting, had no speed, and ....  I really like 1929 to 1932 car, but most have disadvantages on the road (lots of glitz though).   There is room is in the garage for a Ford GPW, a really neat pre-WWII MG or ..., a Cord L-29, and perhaps something else in a Close Coupled Sedan or another Convertible Sedan, and ....

 

John,  should we say you are an "Auburn Guy"?    There are "Packard Guys" and "Ford Guys" and definitely "Buick Guys".    I call myself a "Classic Car Guy",  but really have a wide interest if you look at my post.   Steam cars to S3 454 cars is good spread.   I think I'm just a "Car Guy".

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've  always liked fifties styling in cars. And sixties, to a lesser degree...but still a lot. My older brother (five years my senior) was a big influence in that sense. As a kid, however, I never really had much of a thing a thing for bone-stock-original cars (I preferred hot rods/street machines) until one of my teenage friends showed me the car his family had inherited from his grandmother: a '63 Impala 2 dr. HT in stunning original condition. This would've been in the late 70's when there weren't many of those left in essentially #1 condition, or close to it. My interest in original stuff with patina increased when an all original 1968 BSA Royal Star came my way about 20 years ago. That being said, I don't really like so much patina on cars that they look un-cared for, but appreciate all levels of originality regardless. I'm also, however, in awe of beautifully restored old cars. Unfortunately, I can't afford show level restorations - either as a projects or completed vehicles - so I settle for driver-level "refurbishments" on my cars that that need improvement. These are done in the spirit of originality, as cost keeps me from the "whatever-the-cost" approach to originality. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

John,  should we say you are an "Auburn Guy"?    There are "Packard Guys" and "Ford Guys" and definitely "Buick Guys".    I call myself a "Classic Car Guy",  but really have a wide interest if you look at my post.   Steam cars to S3 454 cars is good spread.   I think I'm just a "Car Guy".

Yes, an Auburn guy.  I do have other interest too - Gene Perkin's pulled me aside eons ago and said he knew I had other interests, but would I please stick with CCCA cars for as long as I was able - and for the most part I have. 

 

The list so far and probably forgetting something:

1935 Auburn 851 S/C Phaeton - my parents and a work friend of theirs owned in 1970's

1931 Auburn Phaeton - part owner in 1980's

1929 Auburn 8-90 Cabriolet - part owner in 1990's

1929 Auburn 8-90 Cabriolet - part owner in early 2000's

1935 Auburn 851 Sedan - 2005 - 2006 and now with new ACD Club President, Craig Birkhold

1935 Auburn 851 Phaeton - 2007 and now with my parents

1936 Auburn 852 Phaeton - still own and sits in a warehouse currently

1935 Auburn 851 S/C Phaeton - not mine, but a restoration for a friend

1936 Auburn 852 Phaeton - still own and now being restored 

 

Did I mention my Grandfather had a 1932 Auburn Coupe as a new car - a big deal for a Dairy Farm kid to get Bachelors, Master degree, and Doctorate to get a job with Roosevelt ? 

 

 

 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Like Bob the Ridgefield, Ct. annual pre 1942 car show brought to life all the vehicles I could ever wish to own. We heard about the show on the radio! Also the movie in 1959 'Some like it hot' had a great selection of - cars with running boards- and watching the Untouchables on TV with Robert Stack , story line was "ok" but the cars were the best part. ALl of this in the eyes of a 10 year old kid. I tend to focus on the WWI to WWII era cars to both own and collect material , toys, mascots, etc. on. But as I got older I appreciated the postwar cars more as well . My current cars date from 1930 and 1940 . In the early 1970s my daily commute car ( 80 miles round trip each day) was a 1941 Packard 120 station wagon. Hey the car was only 30 years old and even AACA didn't recognize it to count as having an old car at one of their events. Relatives you inherit, good friends you pick and they pick you and you spend generations together. Meeting and talking to and having as friends people that worked or drove  the cars when new has always been an absolute thrill. Hearing Howard Carey who was a test driver for Franklin in Syracuse tell me how he used to roll a car over once a month while testing them out and other stories was and is history first hand . I have driven pre WWII era cars a total of over 100,000 miles. Loved and still love every minute of it.

Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

John....I was impressed with the story of your grandfather until you said he went to work for FDR. 🤢

 

 

Of course......I am only joking.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My taste in cars has always been the same.......as a child of the late 60's and early 70's........things that were BIG were cool in my book. Add in that my father was a child of the depression, and passed on all his dislikes of anything Ford, I ended up interested what I saw in the garage at our house and friends.......which were all CCCA people. So I just gravitated to the big CCCA Classics. Also extensively toured with HCCA as a young boy....so they were on my list if "BIG" which means Simplex, Crane, Loco, Winton, Stephens Durye, and the like. I also owned and raced 60's stuff while in high School and college. Never fell love with them........but did enjoy them. Now, I want a car that is unusual, obscure, and if possible unique. Thats what led me to Pierce Arrow in a big way...........along the way, I have owned a BUNCH of stuff........and still try and find the unique.......like the White I am currently working on. Wait till you see what's next! Pick up is this Sunday...........🤔

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

My taste in cars has changed dramatically since I was young. You could not have given me the cars I own today back then. I started by liking late fifties cars, two doors only with V-8 engines. Then gravitated to muscle cars, mostly Dodges and Plymouth’s, again V-8s with manual transmissions four speed preferred.  Now my old cars are both four doors, both inline sixes, and only one manual transmission. My daily is a good sized SUV with a V-6(within a few cu.in. of my older car in displacement) and several bells and whistles(some of which I still don’t know how to operate).  Like food taste and everything else life changes you.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always gravitated toward the cars of the 1950s - the era of my youth and teens.

While my very first car (before being legal to drive) was a 1932 Chevy 5-window coupe which I hot-rodded with an Oldsmobile Rocket-88 engine and Hydra-Matic, my very first actual driver after securing a New Jersey drivers license was my red 1949 Pontiac straight-8 stick-shift convertible. Next came the 1954 Mercury convertible and a very temporary 1954 Ford convertible, followed by a long-term crocus & onyx (yellow & black) 1956 Chevy Bel-air convertible with 265 ci V-8 Powr-Pak, 4-barrel carb, higher-compression heads, high-lift cam, and dual exhausts. The '56 was sold in order to buy the white 283 ci 1958 Chevy Impala convertible, and that was eventually sold to pay for both the 1956 and 1958 Triumphs (TR-2 & TR-3). A 1958 Renault Dauphine served for a short time until the engine gave out on the Wurtzboro Hill on the NY State Quickway (Hwy-17) returning home to Linden, NJ late on a Saturday night after a weekend band gig at a Catskill Mountains (Borscht Belt) resort hotel. A pair of 1959/1960 Rambler Americans, followed by a pair of 1959 Chevys (a Del-Ray 6-cylinder and a Biscayne 283 V-8  with stick shift and Overdrive) were acceptable drivers while I restored, drove, Rallyed, and later sold my 1948 MG-TC. The 1964 Valiant V-200 with 225 slant-6 and 3-on-the-tree was solid and decent, but the more serious commuter/rallye-driver was the 1960 Valiant V-200 sedan - ultimately sold when I ordered my first brand-new car, a 1969 Pontiac Custom"S", essentially ordered and set up as a Mayfair Maize 4-door sedan version of a "GTO in-drag". 

 

Entering the more formal part of the hobby and becoming a member of multiple clubs, we did some swapping with trimacar, passing along three (3) of our many Citroens - a 1971 Estate (station wagon), a 1972 Maserati-engined SM, and a 1964 2-CV (Deux Cheveau) in exchange for a 1927 Chevrolet Capitol AA Roadster and a 1917 Franklin 9-A Touring, soon followed by a 1958 Chevy Bel-air 4-door sedan which became one of our primary Tour-Drivers from 1980 to 2000, along with the red 1963 Impala convertible, red 1976 Dodge Dart GT convertible, seafoam green 1952 Cadillac convertible, 1934 Buick sedan, and 1912 Oakland Touring.

 

Cars of the 1950s have been a primary interest, but HCCA Brass, Nickel, and CCCA-accepted classics, as well as Glidden cars surely have a place in our past, present, and future.

1915 HUDSON - Gregory Neck Plantation - SC.jpg

1930 Packard at louisville 75th Anniversary Meet 008.jpg

LOGAN,UTAH 1941 CADDY-Promentory Point 001.jpg

Taos Chrome 2010 - 1954 Cadillac 007.jpg

1937 Buick at WWII Museum-1.jpg

1965 Corvair Left Rear.jpg

1988 CORVETTE LEFT REAR AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

Edited by Marty Roth
typo, and additional note (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. Have "never met a car I didn't like" but a 60 Ford came close. But prefer "a car that is unusual, obscure, and if possible unique" with AC.

Truth is none of my cars (except the tow car) are ones I would have bought when new, am too errr Scots.

 

Do appreciate all for what they are and prefer "learning experiences". So "if it moves under it own power" I am willing to appreciate it (though a Daimler SP250 is a bit of a strain)

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ben P. said:

Hrmm, interesting question.

My eyes have always preferred cars with the radiator above or behind the front axle (where it belongs), but I questioned my sanity a few years ago when I happened upon a photo of a 1973 Olds 98 like the one my mother had when I was a kid and shuddered when I thought it was kinda pretty. 

 

I recall being taken to the Henry Ford for the first time - spent the whole day drooling over all those old cars (my grandmother still claims it was a problem extracting me - I don’t remember that) and then I remember vividly returning to that 98 in the parking lot and wondering why the world went so wrong. I was probably 3 or 4.

 

As I’ve gotten older I appreciate any nicely kept ‘old’ car. Though I’m probably not in any danger of losing my mind and buying a ‘73 98 because I’m pretty sure they all rotted off the road by the mid 1980’s. Until that photo I hadn’t seen one in 35 years.

 

(Now there’re probably going to come out of the woodwork.)

35B8B885-625A-42C4-A30D-FFD238257B13.jpeg

Beautiful Olds.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...