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Engineering vs Esthetics in a first purchase of a CCCA Classic


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My old neighbor was a Pontiac guy,  he would buy and sell stuff all of the time. He found a ratty 69 Firebird on local CL. Pulled it home, got the motor running drove it around then listed it for sale. It was solid and all there but still ratty. He had a guy in Arizona that bought it, we are in Maryland!  Said the guy was going to fly in and drive the car home!  I expressed how crazy I thought they both were, the guy for wanting to do so and him for letting the guy do it. He told me he that he completely discouraged the buyer from doing so with full disclosure of the car. But he insisted. Charlie did a once over of the brakes and fuel system and lights at an extra cost.  I came home from work one day, the car was gone. No idea how the guy did. Charlie said once it left his drive he didnt want to hear from the guy.

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Had a '67 Grand Prix convertible for a few years. Saw at a show, got cash, picked up in Wichita Kansas and headed for Florida, was still 100F out so left at 6pm and headed for the cool coast. Alone. First time I drove the car. Worst part was at first gas stop I got some on my contact lens. And spent the next  1500 miles wearing two pairs of glasses. Mostly at night. With T-3 headlights. Never missed a beat.

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A "big" Packard is always an excellent choice and that one is beautiful. Is it original or has it been restored in the past? After you get it running and driving I would vote for cosmetic preservation, especially if it is an original car. Looking forward to your project thread!

 

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Interesting fact, I had two people contact me about buying an early 30’s pre war big car from this site in the last year. John was one of them. In the last two weeks, both bought a club sedan.....John and his Packard, and the other friend a 1932 Pierce club sedan. Fun and strange coincidence. I’m certain both gentlemen will be happy with their purchase. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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image.png.dc093894b69bd372c845ad39c4c68e53.pngimage.png.ab8466c72d9eb846adbad1c4e3f92a12.png

 

 

1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Interesting fact, I had two people contact me about buying an early 30’s pre war big car from this site in the last year. John was one of them. In the last two weeks, both bought a club sedan.....John and his Packard, and the other friend a 1932 Pierce club sedan. Fun and strange coincidence. I’m certain both gentlemen will be happy with their purchase. 

 Ed, I am happy with my choice and hope your other friend with the Pierce is as well.  Any pics of it?  Interesting to me that the above beautiful 733 Club Sedan (rear spare like mine) and the Regal 740 Club Sedan have both been very recently listed the HCCA for sale forum.  Packard Club sedans.......as common as Toyota Camry's lately...........

 

IMG_3504.jpg.2cba019a374f09604d8a3c6816f665fe.jpg

 

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Some people looking at these photos may surmise - nice looking but I bet they don't stop well and steer like a truck. Well I can't make the call on the P-A but the Packard steers really well while in motion, even slightly. Both can cruise along comfortable at 50mph+ all day long.  Any larger classic car may be a bit heavy steering if it isn't moving at all and you are trying to fit it into a space only large enough for a squirrels nest. All cars have power steering - the power is in your arms and attitude, you have to accept the fact of size, proportions, weight etc.( and plan ahead where you want to go and want to do)  just the way you accommodate or accept the conditions living in a house of the same era. Vinyl siding vs brick and stucco, solid oak doors vs hollow core doors, etc.

Walt

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Cars of this era steer and stop very well, IF they are in tip top condition.  As I've stated before, a lot of cars that are restored aren't really 100% restored, when it comes to front end and brakes and some mechanicals, they're thought to be "good enough" so they aren't restored to original specifications.

 

I've had the pleasure to drive cars that were done correctly, and they're fabulous.  No, not like a new car in which you feel nothing and steer with your fingertips, but fabulous in the sense that they're NOT like trucks.

 

Unfortunately, many people have only driven partly or entirely worn out cars, thus "they drive like a truck" becomes as misused as "barn find" and "all original low mileage car fully restored"  and "easy restoration".  Oh, and "frame off restoration".....how about body off, makes more sense....and I'm sure there are more...

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@John Bloom

 

I’m learning a lot about cars like your Packard. I’m shedding some of my muscle car interest in favor of cars like you just acquired. Truly a tasteful car that you don’t see everyday and definitely an All American product to be proud of. I can’t wait to see you driving and enjoying the Packard! 
 

 

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25 minutes ago, BobinVirginia said:

@John Bloom

 

I’m learning a lot about cars like your Packard. I’m shedding some of my muscle car interest in favor of cars like you just acquired. Truly a tasteful car that you don’t see everyday and definitely an All American product to be proud of. I can’t wait to see you driving and enjoying the Packard! 
 

 

Good on you Bob. People’s tastes often change through the years.  It would be interesting to write down a “ten car bucket list” at the start of every decade of your life...age 20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90.....

maybe certain cars would make the list and always be in your top ten, but my list would definitely show some changes through the decades. 

 

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I have talked a few guys into overhauling their front suspension, installing new shocks and getting an alignment then pumping up the tires to 32PSI if they are radials, and in every case the car was tranformed. All talk of adding power steering or substituting a modern suspension disappeared. The cars drove and handled so nice when they were put into factory original condition. This was on forties and fifties cars with no power steering but I suspect the same would apply to earlier cars. On a beam axle car I might add a steering damper.

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I have always preferred less than three turns lock to lock. Sunbird cornered best with front tires at 50-55 psi. Discovered that psi was a function of the actual weight on the tire times the max psi divided by the rated load of the tire.

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On 4/18/2021 at 12:57 AM, John Bloom said:

Good on you Bob. People’s tastes often change through the years.  It would be interesting to write down a “ten car bucket list” at the start of every decade of your life...age 20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90.....

maybe certain cars would make the list and always be in your top ten, but my list would definitely show some changes through the decades. 

 

I have written multiple versions of such a list. That might be a good and interesting thread topic. 

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13 hours ago, ericmac said:

I have written multiple versions of such a list. That might be a good and interesting thread topic. 

Those cars that remain on the list consistently are the ones you want after all.

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5 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Those cars that remain on the list consistently are the ones you want after all.

No doubt we all have our core favorites. Two cars that will never change for me is a Black 66 Chevelle or 62 Chevy. Nothing ever fades for me on my interest for that. I do have cars that interest me and fade. Funny how as we get older and experienced, we tune our interests as much as our cars! 

Edited by BobinVirginia (see edit history)
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When I was a kid, on a family trip from Knoxville, TN. down to Chattanooga, TN., we went up a street in Red Bank, TN. and I saw a big 30s era Packard that was parked in the street. It was long, so I imagine a 4 door, had twin side-mount tires, and was painted gold.  We only seen it a couple more times, then the folks we visited moved. After I got my drivers license, of course I went straight down there as soon as I got a chance, and have to this day, never seen it again. I still want one just like it, and  I am 73 now.  I finally did get a Packard, not exactly the same thing, but it was as good a driving and riding car as any we had at the time,and with the 100 hp six ( I think 100 hp is right ), it had no problem on the two lane or 4 lane highways where my wife and I lived in Alabama at the time. ....Packards..... ask the little boy or the old man who wanted one and had one !  Here is a pic of my old 38. Not the prettiest girl at the prom, but I loved her anyway.      Great bunch of posts here guys and gals, thanks!

Packard11.JPG

Packard02.JPG

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3 hours ago, John Byrd said:

When I was a kid, on a family trip from Knoxville, TN. down to Chattanooga, TN., we went up a street in Red Bank, TN. and I saw a big 30s era Packard that was parked in the street. It was long, so I imagine a 4 door, had twin side-mount tires, and was painted gold.  We only seen it a couple more times, then the folks we visited moved. After I got my drivers license, of course I went straight down there as soon as I got a chance, and have to this day, never seen it again. I still want one just like it, and  I am 73 now.  I finally did get a Packard, not exactly the same thing, but it was as good a driving and riding car as any we had at the time,and with the 100 hp six ( I think 100 hp is right ), it had no problem on the two lane or 4 lane highways where my wife and I lived in Alabama at the time. ....Packards..... ask the little boy or the old man who wanted one and had one !  Here is a pic of my old 38. Not the prettiest girl at the prom, but I loved her anyway.      Great bunch of posts here guys and gals, thanks!

 

 

 

3 hours ago, John Byrd said:

  Here is a pic of my old 38. Not the prettiest girl at the prom, but I loved her anyway.      Great bunch of posts here guys and gals, thanks!

 

 

Your 38 needs no apologies......I would have been thrilled to take her to the Prom!

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35 minutes ago, John Bloom said:

 

Your 38 needs no apologies......I would have been thrilled to take her to the Prom!

It's not always the prettiest one's that turn out to be the most fun anyway!

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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder!  All the girls are beautiful as far as I can see and have only gotten better looking the older I’ve gotten! 

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