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What am I going to do with all this stuff!


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Last year I started sorting out and setting up thousands of pieces and parts that Roy and Jeff Harper had saved up for years. It's an overwhelming task! And the plan was to have an open house sale sometime early this spring. But you all know what happened this year! Nobody's going anywhere or doing anything! So I thought I just share a few of the pictures. There's early teens and twenties parts from many makes. There's a few interesting tools and lots of other goodies. Is anybody still casting their own Pistons? There's a Van Norman piston grinder in here as well. A few early Chevy 4-cylinder engines pre-1929. There are model T and A engines there's a Durant and a Studebaker. All four cylinder engines. At this point I'm not sure how to do this. I'd like to get as much as I can for the family. I did have one guy come in and make an offer. I had a long discussion with him about how long it would take to remove it and what his total plan was and I didn't feel that it was going to be acceptable. Yes I have many more pictures!

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Wow.....lots of stuff. With the hobby evolving things that were of value and in demand are now falling out of favor. We bought a Van Norman boring bar that was in good used condition for less than the local machine shop charges us to punch out a V-8 Chevy. We now do our own work with our own machines the same day we want the work done, and can control the process and quality. There are tons of machines and equipment being sold for scrap that it’s almost a sin. Large hoards of parts and supplies are almost impossible to move today.......at any number. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Pictures with less stuff in it posted on this forum might move some of it. In the picture with the top of the doors in the foreground, under the doors is what appears to an engine. Can you get a better picture of that piece? The carbs might sell well, 4 to 5 in a picture. I would scrap the electric motors or post 4 to 5 in a craigslist ad. The thing is, you don't know if they work or not. Hand tools in general are down to $1.00 ea. but will sell in box lots. Box lots will be your best option to move most of this stuff. I've seen the chevy 4 motors sell for $25 ea. though the heads can be sold for $100. I would organize the stuff into piles, motors in one pile, carbs in another, tools, motor parts, etc. Then deal with the piles. I've dealt with a few of these estates. The problem is people want more money than its worth and what is your time worth?

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It is the age old problem.   How much time and effort do you want to put in?    If you try to maximize total return you may find that you paid yourself 2.00/hr when you are done.  Maybe.

 

An offer on the entire lot where everything is moved in a timely manner probably is the way to go assuming you can find someone that will do it.  Maybe you could cherry pick some things first that clearly have value,  but I see a lot of scrap.

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THIS is exactly why all of us should do something with our hoards BEFORE we're dead. I know, I know, you're going to get to that project someday or you're just sure that part is worth three times more than anyone has ever offered you so you're going to hold out for that one guy, but no, just sell it when you have all your faculties intact so you can correctly identify the parts. Collections that take a lifetime to amass take only an afternoon to shovel into a dumpster, which is usually what happens. 

 

Get the stuff to someone who can use it before your next-of-kin have to deal with it, because they don't want to, they don't know anything about it, and they don't care about how much money it might represent--they just don't want the headache. If you truly care about your family and "the hobby" sell ALL your crap before it's too late. Otherwise you should simply assume it will be lost forever and smelted into soup cans.

 

17 hours ago, Ovalrace25 said:

I did have one guy come in and make an offer. I had a long discussion with him about how long it would take to remove it and what his total plan was and I didn't feel that it was going to be acceptable.

 

Call him back first thing tomorrow and take his offer. There's no windfall, no extra money to be made, the family doesn't care, they just want this part of the nightmare over and done. Don't flush your life (and theirs) down this particular drain chasing a few extra pennies on the dollar.

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I've sold car parts for 58 years. I see mostly scrap. From your photos , only the carbs MIGHT have some value.

Carb cores sell for about $25 , if you can find the guy that needs the one you have.

I think you will be blessed if you find a buyer for the whole lot.

So much labor involved , and so much space needed. 

It will be tough to sell that building until it's emptied, even difficult to use the way it is.

Figure an hour of your time for EACH piece if you try to sell it piece meal , that's what I've averaged through the years. Very low wages. You've got to really enjoy the hobby to do it.

Good luck, sleep well.

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Matt has the right idea. Let it go! But I had a long talk with the guy that made an offer. Actually, I talked him out of it. Best I stay friends with him! I know how much work it would be to load it all up! If it weren't for this pandemic, I have enough to put on a substantial swap meet. These few pictures are a small poprtion of what I have to sell. AND then if I roll in a few cars I have, wow--- crazy... Almost like Hershey! ------- well almost

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Just thinking about what cars and parts I could add to the mix.. Project cars, 56 Chevy- yep, two of them, the 66 Continental convert and sedan, 48 Packard coupe, 30 Hupmobile, 60 Cad, 61 Cad Fleetwood, 58 Fleetwood where does it end!

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7 minutes ago, roysboystoys said:

I've sold car parts for 58 years. I see mostly scrap. From your photos , only the carbs MIGHT have some value.

Carb cores sell for about $25 , if you can find the guy that needs the one you have.

I think you will be blessed if you find a buyer for the whole lot.

So much labor involved , and so much space needed. 

It will be tough to sell that building until it's emptied, even difficult to use the way it is.

Figure an hour of your time for EACH piece if you try to sell it piece meal , that's what I've averaged through the years. Very low wages. You've got to really enjoy the hobby to do it.

Good luck, sleep well.

YES! I agree! But it is not easy to load up 3 Chevy pre-1930 4 cylinder engines, a couple complete model A engines and many T and A pieces and take them to scrap. And that Durrant engine and a few others. It is not about the money, really, I already have thousands pout of pocket paying a couple helpers to clean up. And it is not even my building. Just doing it because I am the neighbor...... I guess I have to reevaluate myself! HA!   

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I might ad that if you could separate the early Brass era items by make, you may interest some of us further to explore and maybe purchase something.  The hobby is faltering but some things are still moving, most of us are aware of that fact and simply can not or will not pay high prices for the mundane pieces that will be mundane even when completed.

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Several lots of 4-5 carburetors have sold quickly on this site in the recent past but they have to be boxed and shipped so again, how much time do you have. If these were your parts and you could pocket the money, or if you just want to help this family out from the goodness of your heart... but you can already see how overwhelming it can be. I can see some parts that might have real value or some effort to save them should be undertaken. The problem is there are less and less project cars being restored today and less and less people willing to take on projects. Nobody wants to see these guys prized possessions scrapped. The equipment I would post to craigslist or facebook.

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4 minutes ago, AHa said:

Several lots of 4-5 carburetors have sold quickly on this site in the recent past but they have to be boxed and shipped so again, how much time do you have. If these were your parts and you could pocket the money, or if you just want to help this family out from the goodness of your heart... but you can already see how overwhelming it can be. I can see some parts that might have real value or some effort to save them should be undertaken. The problem is there are less and less project cars being restored today and less and less people willing to take on projects. Nobody wants to see these guys prized possessions scrapped. The equipment I would post to craigslist or facebook.

Yep, Probably what I will do. After I deal with my own "stuff" in my shop. Too many people waiting for me to finish their projects!

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If your real goal is to save some of it from the scrapyard;  How about heavy advertising on F/B Marketplace, and C/L, and any website you can for a one/two weekend indoor tag sale?  You'd be smart to talk it up really good as "all of it is going dirt cheap".  People should come for that reason, but you should have 25 cents/one dollar/3 dollar tables set up for pics in your ads, that would really tempt those who don't really need or want anything, but cannot resist scrap priced bargains.

 

There is a fairly large vintage tractor/farm equipment club here that puts on 3 swaps per year and one older guy who must get his stuff free from cleaning up estates; he puts most smalls on the 25 cent tables, then very few on a 3 dollar table, and just a scant few larger items like table saws for maybe $15-20.  That guy is beyond swamped with real buyers from daybreak to Noon/1pm when it gets picked clean like a Thanksgiving Turkey.  Chaos, but he ends up with good money and brings almost nothing home.

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Well, this won’t help much with this particular situation, but I can relate what had gone on before I bought a car out of a 50 year estate:

The deceased owner had a small collection of 4 restored pre-war Buick’s and 2 buildings full of associated ‘spare’ parts — he literally had 2 and 3 of everything. We’re talking 50 years of Hershey hauls.

Unfortunately a probate court was involved since there was a will and of course it mandated that each item be appraised. An impossible task.

 

What saved the family was they invited a couple of his car buddies over and in exchange for parts they wanted they identified and sorted EVERYTHING by car. Thus, when each car was appraised and sold with it went with all its associated parts as one lot.


Luckily his buddies knew a lot and did a darn good job of correctly identifying everything and had they not done this I never would’ve bought the car. I could’ve spent 2 years in there and still not be confident I identified all the correct parts to the car. I only ended up with 1 item which did not belong to it and it tickles me to death that we identified it on this forum and it went to a home that needed it. I almost threw it away but that’s another story.


The moral of the story is — label your stuff guys. Label it, or it’s going into the trash when you’re gone. Believe me, they won’t even take the time to sort it for scrap. Think landfill. (Or at least leave the tag on it from when you bought it at Hershey.)

 

That said, I will never buy another car out of an estate again as long as I live. Why? Because I’ve spent 2 years getting to the bottom of stuff the owner could’ve told me in less than 5 minutes - “I did X at X time for X reason.” But some cars choose their owners....

 

Good luck

 

 

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Is that the Zenith 04 Carburetor that I was told would match my project?

 

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I've been avoiding California like a plague.  But, it would be fun to head down there and poke around a bit.

 

The piston machine sounds interesting.  Perhaps some other machine tools.

 

I've been wondering about boring vintage engines.  For something like a Chevy 350, one simply bores and buys new pistons.

 

However, a note I saw online suggested cleaning up iron pistons, brazing a fresh layer of brass or bronze on them, then machining to size.  It sounded like an interesting way to reuse the old parts.

 

I presume there would be a need to periodically completely recast a badly damaged piston or other parts.  I have a badly damaged water jacket manifold on my Continental engine. 

 

I am hunting for some 24x4.5" lockring split rims (or something close).

 

 

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Is there any way that this could all be sold as a working business/machine shop/restoration shop?

 

I realize finding the perfect match for equipment and buyer would be tough.  And, there certainly would be benefits of modernizing during a transition, but there are some things that would work well with "old school".

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10 minutes ago, CliffordK said:

Is that the Zenith 04 Carburetor that I was told would match my project?

 

Carbs.thumb.jpg.94c48466fa7f5572d7cce4888dedb25f.jpg

 

I've been avoiding California like a plague.  But, it would be fun to head down there and poke around a bit.

 

The piston machine sounds interesting.  Perhaps some other machine tools.

 

I've been wondering about boring vintage engines.  For something like a Chevy 350, one simply bores and buys new pistons.

 

However, a note I saw online suggested cleaning up iron pistons, brazing a fresh layer of brass or bronze on them, then machining to size.  It sounded like an interesting way to reuse the old parts.

 

I presume there would be a need to periodically completely recast a badly damaged piston or other parts.  I have a badly damaged water jacket manifold on my Continental engine. 

 

I am hunting for some 24x4.5" lockring split rims (or something close).

 

 

There are a few dozen lockring split rims. I have not measured or identified any of them. I also have a few dozen in my shop. I am next door to this building, may go have a look for a few things I have been asked about.  

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Yes, this is overwhelming. And anyone that has been to MY shop knows I have tons of cars and parts here as well! Now working on several projects of my own, adding this thing has taken the word "busy" to a new level! I'm going to ask a few folks that are not working due to the covid19 if they want to start listing this stuff for sale and take the money.. Maybe share some with me--- I have had two people working on this since January. Yep, plenty out of pocket, but there are pieces I can use.

Two years ago I needed a specific horn for a project. I bought a core for $150. there are two like it on one table. I would like to have a "on-car tire spin balancer" yep, there are two of them. It goes on and on.

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4 minutes ago, JFranklin said:

Maybe move what you want to your shop and then call the auctioneer! It will disappear in a day or two.

Good suggestion. Actually the auctioneer did look before anyone touched it... He choked and ran! ---  Now I am sure he could do some final set up and go ahead. There was also an old mobile office trailer outside loaded so full it had collapsed on itself. We pulled it apart, unloaded and sorted parts, hauled out about nine tons of stuff... Got rid of two old forklifts and four cars. Dont worry, cars were Chevy Diesel Blazers and a Dodge D-50 4x4 all found homes. Amazing what was found under ivy and blackberry bushes!  

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When I had the job of cleaning out my Father's main building, probably 30'X60 with 30X40 of it two story. Much of it you could only get through by walking on top of stuff. I pulled what I wanted out. A fellow came to look at it in the hopes of buying a couple of things and I told him I really wanted to sell it all. He asked what I thought it was worth and I told him, he was about to walk away when I said that I wasn't planning on spending 10 years of my life to get that price (very poor hourly rate). He threw a number at me that was about 10 cents on a dollar from what I told him. He wanted to cherry pick and leave the rest. I told him I would take his offer but it was for everything, building was to be ready to sweep out with a broom when he finished. I sweetened the deal by telling him he could cherry pick part of another building. We then added that he had 6 months to clear it out, then the rent would start. The first year was about 1/2 the going rate for renting a building that size. At the end of that year the rent went to market value for rent. Took him 1 1/2 years to clear it out. Wasn't quit broom ready but it was close. The agreement was in writing.

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1 minute ago, Jim Bollman said:

When I had the job of cleaning out my Father's main building, probably 30'X60 with 30X40 of it two story. Much of it you could only get through by walking on top of stuff. I pulled what I wanted out. A fellow came to look at it in the hopes of buying a couple of things and I told him I really wanted to sell it all. He asked what I thought it was worth and I told him, he was about to walk away when I said that I wasn't planning on spending 10 years of my life to get that price (very poor hourly rate). He threw a number at me that was about 10 cents on a dollar from what I told him. He wanted to cherry pick and leave the rest. I told him I would take his offer but it was for everything, building was to be ready to sweep out with a broom when he finished. I sweetened the deal by telling him he could cherry pick part of another building. We then added that he had 6 months to clear it out, then the rent would start. The first year was about 1/2 the going rate for renting a building that size. At the end of that year the rent went to market value for rent. Took him 1 1/2 years to clear it out. Wasn't quit broom ready but it was close. The agreement was in writing.

Pretty sure that is what will happen to all my STUFF when I go.. You that know me and have been here understand-- My wife doesn't. 

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On 9/7/2020 at 1:32 PM, George Rohrbach said:
When you look at the rims, could you check for these Studebaker rims. 
Thanks 
George Rohrbach
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There are at least 200 of them here in my shop and over at Roy and Jeff's. I already have a headache thinking about this!

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On 9/7/2020 at 11:29 AM, CliffordK said:

Is that the Zenith 04 Carburetor that I was told would match my project?

 

Carbs.thumb.jpg.94c48466fa7f5572d7cce4888dedb25f.jpg

 

I've been avoiding California like a plague.  But, it would be fun to head down there and poke around a bit.

 

The piston machine sounds interesting.  Perhaps some other machine tools.

 

I've been wondering about boring vintage engines.  For something like a Chevy 350, one simply bores and buys new pistons.

 

However, a note I saw online suggested cleaning up iron pistons, brazing a fresh layer of brass or bronze on them, then machining to size.  It sounded like an interesting way to reuse the old parts.

 

I presume there would be a need to periodically completely recast a badly damaged piston or other parts.  I have a badly damaged water jacket manifold on my Continental engine. 

 

I am hunting for some 24x4.5" lockring split rims (or something close).

 

 

Carb pics

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The key to looking, besides the size, and locking mechanism, might be the sort of raised, thin,  not quite knife edge extension on one side. This is for the clamps to lock in place. 

Thanks, really appreciated. I will provide some Aspirin for you by email! 

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Hi again,

Thanks for the additional photo of the engine behind the doors in photo #3.    

Do you have a fork lift or some other mechanical lift to get the engine into a trailer?    Give me a call at 530 863 3260 to arrange a price for the engine.

Regards,

Willard 

 

 

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I'm thinking auction is the way to go.   The auctioneer will group the stuff in to piles that he thinks somebody will pay at least 5 bucks for something in the pile with the agreement you are taking everything.    I'm sure there is a decent local auctioneer that would take it?

 

Mecum has this going on right now:

 

https://ontime.mecum.com/auction/old-standard-auto-parts-113/bidgallery

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On 9/8/2020 at 3:23 PM, Ovalrace25 said:

There are at least 200 of them here in my shop and over at Roy and Jeff's. I already have a headache thinking about this!

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Any idea what the L head engine furthest away in this shot is ? The one with what looks like  a section of frame still attached . What sort of a price ?

 

Greg

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Clifford, The term "L head" refers to the valve to cylinder configuration. In this case, the valves are all on one side of the cylinders. The term "monobloc" refers to the way the cylinders are cast. In this case, the block is cast as one assembly as opposed to being cast as single cylinders or pairs.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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That engine also has the head and block cast together as one piece.  So there is no separate head.

Pistons are installed through the bottom of the engine.  Valves are accessed through bungs around the spark plugs, and a second bung.

It is very similar to the Continental engine in the truck I'm working on, although the block casting appears to be deeper, and the upper water jacket cover is different.

 

I suppose many aircraft engines use a slightly different approach with a single cylinder/head casting and overhead valves.

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Well gang, I have missed more than 40 phone calls over the last two days from folks asking for more details. Problem is, a darned kidney stone found me early Sunday morning and I am in pain! I need to get pass this thing before I go take more pictures of anything. 

Thinking about just making a decision to bring in an auction service. 

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Hi.   I have been in touch with you about the fan assembly on the engine to the rear in the photo.    When I looked at the top of the engine it was identical to my 1912 Everitt model 4-36 roadster engine which is restored except for the fan assembly which I need.   However while pondering the flywheel I noticed the faint gear slots cut into the engine side of the flywheel.    That makes the engine a 1913 to 1915 Maxwell model 40.   You will have to talk to a Maxwell expert to find the exact year.    The reason I know it is a Maxwell is because I have done decades of research on the Everitt automobile and in 1912, Everitt and Maxwell merged and the Everitt name was dropped for 1913.    The last year of the Everitt they did not have a self starter so the engine you have is not an Everitt.  For a short time Maxwell incorporated Everitt features in their cars but I do not know when they came up with a new design.    I do not know when Maxwell adopted the self starter so that is where you need to talk to the Maxwell expert knowledgeable in those years.

If you decide to sell the fan assembly, please let me know.

Regards,   Willard 

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