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I recently went on vacation to a location in an oceanside community. While there I noticed the air conditioning units (which had only been installed a few years ago) had a very heavy coating of surface rust undoubtedly caused by  a salt air environment. I wondered if there was any machine that could remove the salt from the air while old cars are in storage in such an area (since I have allways wanted to move to a beach community.

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The same AC unit that is corroding away in the salt air on the outside will remove salt from the air on the inside. The salt will stay with the water in the air and go down the condensate drain. So, the answer is the air conditioned garage you always wanted anyways. 
 

I will also add, for you guys on the coast: Rinse off the coils on your outside unit regularly (monthly). A garden hose and light pressure is all it takes. Air conditioners last less than half as long on the coast as they do inland and that little bit of missing maintenance is the only reason why. In Indiana we have to do it a lot less, just to clean dirt and cottonwood off. Actually, in Indiana don’t maintain the equipment, so I can replace yours sooner. 

Edited by gossp (see edit history)
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and never take it out of the garage (grew up on coast). BTW salt air causes more high level rust (e.g. around window sills) particularly cars that sit out in the dew (often heavy).

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Must be a east coast thing. Never had that problem in So. Cal. with cars. Living at the beach in so. Cal. you didn't need A/C and hardly used a heater in winter. 80 degrees was a heat wave and 50 degrees was the depths of a cold cold winter. 

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5 minutes ago, Pfeil said:

Must be a east coast thing. Never had that problem in So. Cal. with cars. Living at the beach in so. Cal. you didn't need A/C and hardly used a heater in winter. 80 degrees was a heat wave and 50 degrees was the depths of a cold cold winter. 

 

No, it's a physics thing. I lived in L.A. for seven years in the beach area. I owned a Vega that never left SoCal. The salt air rusted it just fine.

 

(insert "Vegas were born with rust at the factory" joke here...)

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On 9/6/2020 at 8:31 AM, joe_padavano said:

 

No, it's a physics thing. I lived in L.A. for seven years in the beach area. I owned a Vega that never left SoCal. The salt air rusted it just fine.

 

(insert "Vegas were born with rust at the factory" joke here...)

 

 

Even though I'm in AZ now for 7 years the cars below prove otherwise

Where I lived I didn't have that problem, in fact the 65 VW 1200A I've owned for 52 years I painted in my driveway in 1973 was painted two blocks from the water;

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I'm the original owner of this 69 H-O LeMans I painted this car in 1992  in my driveway also two blocks from the beach,

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I painted this 64 VW Type 113 in 1978 in my driveway in 1978 - also two blocks from the beach;

 Image preview

 

I bought this Olds new in 1976 again two blocks from the beach for over 30 years

Today it's still in it's original paint.

CC170-dR-01.jpg

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)
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I think the east vs west salt air thing has to do with humidity more than proximity to the ocean. Salt+humid air to make it stick to things equals rust.  You could cover bare metal in salt and it wouldn’t rust in a vacuum. 

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1 hour ago, Pfeil said:

Must be a east coast thing. Never had that problem in So. Cal. with cars. Living at the beach in so. Cal. you didn't need A/C and hardly used a heater in winter. 80 degrees was a heat wave and 50 degrees was the depths of a cold cold winter. 

 

Its not the salt air as much as the rock salt used on ice and snow in the winter. 

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Back in the late sixties when I was a child we moved to the Palm Beach Fl area.  We took my grandmother's '55 Studebaker President as a second car and drove it to church one Sunday as usual.  When we came out it was totally dead and of course my father had no idea what was wrong.  After a mechanic had it for a day or two he told my father it was a common thing.  The salt air air had cause corrosion in the electrical connections and all he did was clean some of them up, not sure which ones though.  Don't know why I always remembered this, interesting to a boy I guess.

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I could be wrong didn't Rolls Royce have some trouble with aluminium bodied 1930's cars that rotted out near the salt water air ?

 

I would hate to see what the salty air would do to this car.

 

1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Roadster: A pretty penny

OKGB5OGMUFFA5NLXEFSN6LHKTQ

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15 minutes ago, John348 said:

 

Its not the salt air as much as the rock salt used on ice and snow in the winter. 

 

Obviously, but my day job has to do with launch vehicles. The corrosion on launch pads and service towers at Vandenberg AFB in California is just about as bad as it is at Canaveral in Florida. Neither one of those sees salty roads...

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Michael C Wauhop, our salty cars may rust a bit faster, but the best thing to do is enjoy the thing while it's rusting, then get something else. You can own more cars in a salty area because of this, but be sure to ship each of your replacement cars from a dry area, ha !

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I have often wondered if something else is at work such as requires both salt in the air AND exposure to heavy dew/rain. OTOH the west coast of Florida (Tampa) does not rust near as bad as the east coast. (and why I live in the middle).

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California "beach cars" are notorious. From just north of LA up the coast, the hot summer, inland, weather draws in moisture, often in the form of fog, most often in the late afternoon. People who have visited SF in the summer have experienced the fog belt first hand. Uneven topography, of much of the west coast, limits the deteriorating effect of the "fog belt," and later in the year the effects of offshore weather systems, brought in by the west to east prevailing wind.

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On 9/6/2020 at 10:31 AM, joe_padavano said:

 

No, it's a physics thing. I lived in L.A. for seven years in the beach area. I owned a Vega that never left SoCal. The salt air rusted it just fine.

 

(insert "Vegas were born with rust at the factory" joke here...)

 

So were Chevy LUV trucks........don't ask how I know....... :blink:

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My trans am was sold new in Corpus Christie, Texas, then at some time someone from Tampa FLA ended up with it. I bought it from a guy in Umatilla FLA. that got it from the Tampa guy. That poor car had more rust than Carter had liver pills!  I was talking to a FLA guy one time that swore FLA cars did not rust, I respectfully disagreed! As a disclaimer, the top was rusted beyond, the frame was very solid though. Funny enough the donor car I bought for sheet metal came out of North New Jersey. The body was absolutely perfect. I think with some rubbing compound I could have gotten a show car shine. The under carriage however was non existent. My thought was that the owner washed the car religiously keeping it in great shape, they just never thought to wash the winter salt off the bottom.

 

Yes, Aluminum will corrode very badly in a salt weather environment. I had a condo in OC md and the life of the aluminum framed screen doors was about 7 yrs or so.

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Since moving to Orlando I've become accustomed to removing exhaust manifolds with out breaking a bolt/stud. Have sold cars on chassis pictures. Here, rust must be imported.

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