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British Columbia pre-war cars that have survived


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Back in the late 50s Don Hoskins was on the lookout for an old car to work on.  One day he spotted a fellow working his fields with an old Model TT truck so he went up and asked if it was for sale. $100 later it was his.   The truck was a 1924 Ford Model TT one ton.  It had last been licensed in 1937 to a fellow named John Craig, but on close examination Don found the remains of some signage: The Vancouver Milling and Grain Company. Don was able to determine that The Vancouver Milling and Grain Company was a subsidiary of Spillers, the Empire Millers and it likely ended up evolving into Wild Rose Flour.

 

It was quite a few years before Don could get going on the TT truck.  Serious work began after he retired as he and his son tackled a full restoration.  It was finally completed in 2003 and ready for the VCCC's annual May Tour, where it won a first place ribbon.  Don has left us now but the truck is still in the family.

 

The pictures below show the Model TT as found in 1959, still sitting in 1978, restored in 2003, and on the set of the TV show "When Calls the Heart" in 2015.


There is a good article on this truck in the October/November 2003 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.


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This is 1912 Mann Overtype Steam Wagon #811, one of five that were shipped from Leeds, England, to Vancouver in 1912.  The city used them in various departments - this one was for the Street Department and was in use until after WWI.  In the early '20s the city replaced the Mann tractors with Mack model C trucks.

 

The city sold this Mann to the Telkwa Colliery in northern B.C.  In 1925 it again sold, this time at a bankruptcy auction to Tom Oakley of McBride who converted it for use as a farm tractor.  In 1955 Harold Lamming bought it for use as a soil fertilizer but in 1957 it was cut up and the boiler preserved as a greenhouse heater. 

 

In 1968 the story began to circulate of a British steam truck in the area and a fellow named Roger got on the trail.  He bought the boiler first and then set about locating whatever else remained.  It was before highway 16 was completed and the story includes fording rivers, driving along dry riverbeds, and lots of mechanical wizardry to extricate heavy parts and get them loaded for shipping.

 

Eventually it was determined that this was 1912 Mann steam wagon 3811, one of only five remaining.  (#761 is at the forestry Museum in Duncan.)  From 1969 to 2004 Roger worked at the restoration, restoring and fabricating as necessary.  The Mann made its debut at the Crater Valley Steam Show near Kamloops in 2004.

 

Specifications:
Length
- 24 ft. Width - 7.5 ft.  Height - 7.5 ft. Weight - 12000 lbs
2
Cylinder Cross Compound Engine with flat slide valves
Overtype Mounted
with 4.5" Bore by 8" Stroke & 7" Bore by 8" Stroke
One low pressure cylinder and one 
high pressure cylinder
Boiler operates on
 200 lbs of steam; Fuel - Coke or Welsh Coal
3 speed transmission with differential lock; Roller chain drive to rear axle
Wagon type steering - Direct worm quadrant; Top speed - 28 mph

Brakes - Footpedal, Reverse engine, or Pull a long lever bar moving wooden blocks against rear wheels like - brake shoes
Manufacturer - Mann's Patent Steam Cart & Wagon Co. Ltd.


This information is a summary of a good article in the August/September 2004 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.


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                                                                   1925, in McBride, B.C.

 

 

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                                                                     After restoration in 2004.

 

 

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On 9/7/2020 at 9:41 AM, PFindlay said:

This 1913 Peerless 6-48 Torpedo was one of the Silver Brothers' cars which were retrieved from their dilapidated garage in 1965.  Their father William was a wealthy developer and politician in Burnaby, B.C.   He had a large property on Kingsway and his two sons, Will and Hugh, operated a garage nearby.  Willliam never drove but he loved luxury cars.  By 1936 the two sons were living in the home along with some of William's cars.  The cars remained there until 1965 when a snowstorm damaged the garage.  Members of the Vintage Car Club of Canada helped rescue them and by the early 70s both brothers had died and the cars were left to friends.  They are all still in B.C.

 

Here is a Vancouver Sun article by Alyn Edwards about the Silver Brothers:

https://www.pressreader.com/canada/vancouver-sun/20121005/282488590952153

 

Here is a digitized version of the 16mm film that was made in 1965:

 

 

Below are pictures of the home, along with one of the Wintons, which was not among the preserved cars, and the inside of the Silver Brothers' shop circa 1918.  (Pictures from the Burnaby Archives)  Also a recent picture of the Peerless.  

 

 

Silver Home.jpg

Silver Garage.jpg

1913 Peerless.jpg

 

 

Going back to the Silver Brothers' cars ... Here are two pictures that Peter Trant has contributed.  They were taken by Ed Aveling and give a good idea of what the Pierce Arrow touring looked like when the cars were retrieved.

 

Image14b.thumb.jpg.41989feb2530f62e39424bbfb842bea2.jpg

 

 

Image15a.thumb.jpg.cf4f085e18b00abe36a2a9d3ee002b52.jpg

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It may be hard to find a more well-documented car than this one ...

 

This 1929 Roosevelt (made by Marmon) was sold in Vancouver on October 1, 1929.  The price was $1595 and it was just 4 weeks before the big market crash of 1929.  The buyer was Alexander Wilson and the car has since been passed down in the family.  Reportedly, the car has had only four drivers in its 90 year history.  I found the story of this car in the June/July 2007 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.  Here are some excerpts, as told by the granddaughter of Alexander Wilson.

 

... My granddad drove it until 1945 and in June 1948 he transferred the car to my dad, Jim Wilson. At the time of the transfer the mileage was 29,360 miles. ...  My only recollections of the car while my granddad owned it were a few Sunday drives down to the grain elevators by the old Second Narrows Bridge and a stop at the Glenburn Dairy for a cone on the way home.

 

... Dad drove it to work every day, going from the twenty seven hundred block of First Avenue to Easthope Bros., which at that time was located on Coal Harbour just outside of Stanley Park.  Dad, being an avid duck hunter drove out to Pitt Meadows every weekend during duck hunting season until Pitt Meadows was reclaimed for farming. 

 

... Every repair, replacement. oil change and mileage has been written down ... in 1949 he put in a new clutch plate. new compression rings ... The major engine overhaul was done in October 1953 when the mileage was 51,270 miles.

 

... Weekends were great because dad liked to take us on Sunday drives ... We felt pretty lucky as we were able to explore the Fraser Valley up to Hope, Richmond, Delta, the airport,
White Rock and Crescent Beach.  

 

... ln 1959 when dad finally took it off the road the mileage reading was 70,174. Still it continued to have its place in the garage. 

 

... It was April 26th, 1984 that dad felt it was time to make the transfer.  By this time we had a garage to keep the car in and that was very important to dad. We thought that maybe we could drive it to our house in Coquitlam, but one look at the tires made him change his mind. 


Restoration was begun in 1999 and finished in 2005.  ... Now our son David has taken the Roosevelt out for a couple of spins and he thinks it is great.  Hence driver number four
and seeing as he is the registered owner of the car it only seems only right that he should learn how to drive and enjoy the car. 

 

Pictures below are from 1934, 1998, and 2006.


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On 9/26/2020 at 12:17 AM, KLF said:

I found a picture of Paul Bolam's 12 Napier T48.

Ken

By the way I took this picture when I was 13 years old. The hobby never lets go!

 

Bolam's first Napier.jpg

Here's another picture of Paul's bigger Napier, around 1970.  Quite a car.

 

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My first close up exposure to brass cars was in the early 1970's. Bert Beaton was a collector that had 8-10 cars including a 1911 40hp White. The White was only a chassis but had started out as a 7 passenger touring. It had been used a a stage in the Cariboo region of BC. In the 50's Fred Louck had discovered the complete chassis and brought it down to Abbotsford where he lived. Bert and Fred worked on it for a while and eventually Bert ended up with it. Mechanically it was good but there was no body or fenders. Bert made up the speedster body. The wheels were missing. A set of 28" wheels we provided by Ken Dahl. They were off a 6 cyl Mitchell chassis that Ken had. The hubcaps to this day still say Mitchell. I was lucky enough to drive this car a number of times. In 1974 my wife and I drove it over to Victoria and took it on the 4th Malahat Challenge brass car run. It was a very fast car with 4th gear being overdrive. One poor feature was when you pulled on the hand brake for extra stopping power going down a hill, it pulled the clutch down! We went down the cut in North Van on the way home picking up speed the whole way. I couldn't hold it back! It was a terrifying experience. Not with standing I sure wanted to buy that White from Bert but it wasn't to be. Eventually he sold all his cars to the BC Transportation museum. When the museum was disbanded the White ended up back in the Cariboo in a small local museum. It's still there today looking the same and doesn't appear to have run for many, many years. The picture of it in the room is where it is today.

Ken

1911 WHITE circa 1974 Easter.jpg

1911 White 40 Bert Beaton circa 1982.jpg

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On 10/19/2020 at 6:15 AM, PFindlay said:

 

 

Going back to the Silver Brothers' cars ... Here are two pictures that Peter Trant has contributed.  They were taken by Ed Aveling and give a good idea of what the Pierce Arrow touring looked like when the cars were retrieved.

 

Image14b.thumb.jpg.41989feb2530f62e39424bbfb842bea2.jpg

 

 

Image15a.thumb.jpg.cf4f085e18b00abe36a2a9d3ee002b52.jpg

 

And here are two pictures of the 1915 Pierce Arrow Roadster in 1972 after it was restored.  This is the car that is shown in the Silver Brothers' video back on page 1 of this thread.

 

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777420431_PierceArrow2.thumb.jpg.6c4085c6059adbf8e712d6b36520abcf.jpg

 

Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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This 1926 Cadillac coupe was sold new ($4900) in Santa Barbara, California.  The purchaser was Mr. Jesse Podger.  Podger lived in Toronto in 1904, and later Winnipeg, but moved to Santa Barbara with his wife in 1919.  In 1928 the Podgers moved to Victoria and brought the Cadillac with them.  It appears that he (or a subsequent owner) may have traded it in to "Motor House Victoria Ltd." by 1950.  Records show that by 1954 it was owned by William Duncan and then sold to Eva Craycroft, both of Victoria.

 

In 1957 Newell Morrison acquired the car at his Victoria Chev-Olds dealership.  He was told that the car had belonged to a doctor and was used mostly on Saltspring Island.  He cleaned it up and got it running well and made plans to drive it on the 1958 Fernie to Victoria tour.  Unfortunately, he was unable to attend so his friend Bud Bucan drove the car for him.  

 

In 1960 the Cadillac was sold to Island Holdings Ltd, Ladysmith, and in 1969 it went to Fred Bell for a few months.  Fred passed it on to Richard McGladrey and two years later it was traded in at C and R Motors in Nanaimo.

 

In 1971, the car came over to the mainland with stops at Dick Erwin Chevrolet (the "great, great guy") in North Vancouver and then Carter Pontiac Buick in Burnaby. In 1978 it was sold to a Prince George owner named Duncan and then in 1981 Mr. James Perry bought it.  The current owners acquired it in 2005, after Perry died.

 

By 2008 the car was restored and in 2008 it was driven on its second Fernie to Victoria tour, looking and running great the whole way. 

 

There is a good article on this car in the August/September 2008 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.

 

 

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Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, PFindlay said:

This 1926 Cadillac coupe was sold new ($4900) in Santa Barbara, California.  The purchaser was Mr. Jesse Podger.  Podger lived in Toronto in 1904, and later Winnipeg, but moved to Santa Barbara with his wife in 1919.  In 1928 the Podgers moved to Victoria and brought the Cadillac with them.  It appears that he (or a subsequent owner) may have traded it in to "Motor House Victoria Ltd." by 1950.  Records show that by 1954 it was owned by William Duncan and then sold to Eva Craycroft, both of Victoria.

 

In 1957 Newell Morrison acquired the car at his Victoria Chev-Olds dealership.  He was told that the car had belonged to a doctor and was used mostly on Saltspring Island.  He cleaned it up and got it running well and made plans to drive it on the 1958 Fernie to Victoria tour.  Unfortunately, he was unable to attend so his friend Bud Bucan drove the car for him.  

 

In 1960 the Cadillac was sold to Island Holdings Ltd, Ladysmith, and in 1969 it went to Fred Bell for a few months.  Fred passed it on to Richard McGladrey and two years later it was traded in at C and R Motors in Nanaimo.

 

In 1971, the car came over to the mainland with stops at Dick Erwin Chevrolet (the "great, great guy") in North Vancouver and then Carter Pontiac Buick in Burnaby. In 1978 it was sold to a Prince George owner named Duncan and then in 1981 Mr. James Perry bought it.  The current owners acquired it in 2005, after Perry died.

 

By 2008 the car was restored and in 2008 it was driven on its second Fernie to Victoria tour, looking and running great the whole way. 

 

There is a good article on this car in the August/September 2008 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.

 

 

847039820_26Cadillac2.thumb.jpg.b6b2130f33b5a1f0db0805790c0fb998.jpg

 

 

686632027_1926cadillac3.thumb.jpg.745ac00412d4b959551cae4dccda2393.jpg

Thanks for the interesting history of this car; as you mentioned,it was owned by my father at one time. 
If I may, I can add a little from the time that Dad owned it. 
In addition to old cars, Dad had a couple of things he was very passionate about; steam, Colt revolvers, and Winchester rifles. He had a big safe in the basement full of Colts, and a pegboard wall in the den with a complete collection of Winchesters, rifles and carbines, from the model 1866 Yellow Boy all the way to the Model 1895 Flatside. Including a Model 1886 in .50-110 express but that’s another story. 
Anyway, If Dad decided that he wanted something, nothing was sacred, and all bets were off. I came home from school one day, and the pegboard wall was just empty hooks, and the safe was gone from the basement. But there was a 1926 Cadillac in the driveway. 
It wasn’t too long before Ram McGladrey had the remains of a 1905 Oldsmobile Light Tonneau. It was very rough, basically the bare engine and rusty frame. But Dad had to have it, and soon the Caddy was gone and the remains of the Olds was in the garage. The Cadillac was traded for the Olds. Dad did restore the Olds; it was Canadian built and is now in the museum in its birthplace; St. Catharine’s Ontario. 

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Edited by 13White (see edit history)
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In 1937 Val Kosiancic ordered this 1937 White 3 ton truck from Smedley's Garage in Nelson, B.C.  It had a 270 cubic inch engine, 5 speed transmission, and a 14 foot steel deck with hydraulic lift.  At the time it was one of the biggest trucks in the Kootenays and cost $3000.  Val used the truck to haul logs and lumber for the mill he owned and when that work wasn't busy enough he would haul farm goods for the family farm and just about anything else that would help pay for the truck.  Loads of 10 tons or more weren't uncommon.   In the winter he would mount a plow and clear the roads.  Val had other trucks, older and newer, but this one was his favourite.

 

Val put 96,000 miles on the White, many of them in low gear and working hard, and kept the truck until he died in 1989.  At that time a family member bought the truck and had restored it by 2003.   These days it's probably still seen at special events in the Nelson area.

 

There is a good article about this truck in the December 2002 / January 2003 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.

 

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                                              Hauling hay.  Notice the licence plate: CO-74

 

 

513454694_1937White.jpg.40eb27f6e32e637b0341c2460a4881f2.jpg

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On 10/24/2020 at 8:29 PM, PFindlay said:

In 1937 Val Kosiancic ordered this 1937 White 3 ton truck from Smedley's Garage in Nelson, B.C.  It had a 270 cubic inch engine, 5 speed transmission, and a 14 foot steel deck with hydraulic lift.  At the time it was one of the biggest trucks in the Kootenays and cost $3000.  

 

1202259270_1937White1.jpg.4e4a208649c49c9777d68dcf93cb8df0.jpg

                                              Hauling hay.  Notice the licence plate: CO-74

 

 

 

Does anyone know whatever became of the collection of vintage trucks that were at the Michel Hotel near Sparwood, before it closed and was mindlessly vandalized?   After five years of sitting derelict, it was finally razed, and the truck collection disappeared.

 

There were a couple of White 'Superpower' trucks like above in the collection:  http://www.crowsnest-highway.ca/cgi-bin/citypage.pl?city=SPARWOOD

 

Craig

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On 10/23/2020 at 2:14 PM, 13White said:

It wasn’t too long before Ram McGladrey had the remains of a 1905 Oldsmobile Light Tonneau. It was very rough, basically the bare engine and rusty frame. But Dad had to have it, and soon the Caddy was gone and the remains of the Olds was in the garage. The Cadillac was traded for the Olds. Dad did restore the Olds; it was Canadian built and is now in the museum in its birthplace; St. Catharine’s Ontario.

 

Here is more of the story of the 1905 Oldsmobile that Fred Bell owned (mentioned earlier).  This information is from an article in the December 2006 / January 2007 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.

 

As Fred indicated the frame and engine had been rescued by Ram McGladery in 1968.  Apparently the engine had been used to power a boat for some time and eventually was discarded in a dump on one of the local islands.   There wasn't much to work with.  The engine had serial number P.E.CO.1, which was believed to be Packard Electric Company #1.  This would make it the first Oldsmobile built in the St. Catherines plant.  Ram sold it to Fred Bell, who made a car out the remains and used it locally.  It must have been quite challenge to do this and it's safe to assume that the car was not 100% Oldsmobile.  But it had been saved and was on the road again.

 

Fred sold the Olds to Murray Gammon and the car was on display in Murray's museum in Victoria for 20 years.  When Murray started selling off his cars the Olds went to Jim Leir, who had previously driven the car in a Malahat Challenge Run.  Jim brought it to Summerland and, along with Dave Botten, tore it apart and began to re-restore it.  Eventually Jim passed the project on to Lloyd Orsted, who got right to work on it and had the car running in Summerland parades and events by 2003.  

 

By 2007 the car had gone to Ontario and was owned by John McLaughlin.  John had come out west to look at the car and trailered it back home to display in his antique shop.  It is is now on display in the museum in St. Catherine's.   

 

It remains a mystery how Canadian Oldsmobile #1 would have ended up doing service on Vancouver Island.

 

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                              Jim Leir and daughter Brenda finishing a rainy Malahat Challenge.

 

 

454579027_1905OldsmobileOrsted.jpg.b74dc11e64807a75fe6cc1bd82ce38f9.jpg

                                                 Lloyd Orsted and Lois Dyck in an Okanagan parade.

 

1412386325_1905Oldsmobile.thumb.jpg.a8567d12bc083cb73ef0e8b7dcadc4af.jpg

  Moving into the St. Catherine's museum.                                        (photo by fatthoron on deviantart.com)

 

 

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Craig mentioned this 1942 Packard 180 Formal Sedan back on page one of this thread.  Here is its story.   Earl Tucker says that a fellow was looking at Earl's '49 Packard one day and happened to mention that he knew of another Packard that was stored in a garage.  It was a year before Earl could track it down but it turned out to be this 1942 Packard - what a great find!

 

This Packard is one of six Formal Sedans built before production shut down for the war in February of 1942.  It arrived in Vancouver at Consolidated Motors in March and was delivered on March 20.   The car had been ordered for Elizabeth Rogers who was the wife of Jonathan Rogers.  He was a Vancouver developer and politician (Alderman and Parks Commissioner).   The Rogers building still stands at the corner of Granville and Pender in downtown Vancouver.   He does not appear to be related to Benjamin Rogers of the Rogers Sugar Refinery.

 

Elizabeth and Jonathan Rogers were also philanthropists and were involved in the creation of Vancouver's first Art Gallery and other civic endeavors.  They lived at 2020 Nelson St., near Stanley Park.  In 1935 Jonathan suffered a stroke and his public life was greatly curtailed.  He died in 1945 but Elizabeth continued to live in the mansion by the park until her death in 1960.  My dad remembers seeing the Packard and chauffeur waiting outside the church on Sunday mornings while Mrs. Rogers attended church service each week.  That would be in the 1950s.

 

Mrs. Rogers kept the Packard (chauffeur driven) until 1958, at which time it was sold out of the family.  It ended up belonging to a lawyer named Ken Thompson in Surrey.  When Earl went to see it in the late 1990s, the car had been stored in the garage since 1963.  It had 60,000 miles on it and was in excellent condition inside and out.

 

Earl spent the next two years doing all the mechanical work and stripping and repainting and replating the car.  The original top and passenger interior are still intact.  The driver's compartment received new leather upholstery.  The car is truly top-of-the-line and is loaded with luxurious features.

 

A few years ago, when Earl started to downsize his collection, the Packard was sold and is now in Alberta.

 

There is an article about this Packard in the June / July 2001 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.


 

42_Packard.jpg.806de708036474ddaa111ca1db90836d.jpg

 

 

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Edited by PFindlay
typo (see edit history)
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On 10/26/2020 at 10:29 PM, PFindlay said:

 

Here is more of the story of the 1905 Oldsmobile that Fred Bell owned (mentioned earlier).  This information is from an article in the December 2006 / January 2007 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.

 

As Fred indicated the frame and engine had been rescued by Ram McGladery in 1968.  Apparently the engine had been used to power a boat for some time and eventually was discarded in a dump on one of the local islands.   There wasn't much to work with.  The engine had serial number P.E.CO.1, which was believed to be Packard Electric Company #1.  This would make it the first Oldsmobile built in the St. Catherines plant.  Ram sold it to Fred Bell, who made a car out the remains and used it locally.  It must have been quite challenge to do this and it's safe to assume that the car was not 100% Oldsmobile.  But it had been saved and was on the road again.

 

Fred sold the Olds to Murray Gammon and the car was on display in Murray's museum in Victoria for 20 years.  When Murray started selling off his cars the Olds went to Jim Leir, who had previously driven the car in a Malahat Challenge Run.  Jim brought it to Summerland and, along with Dave Botten, tore it apart and began to re-restore it.  Eventually Jim passed the project on to Lloyd Orsted, who got right to work on it and had the car running in Summerland parades and events by 2003.  

 

By 2007 the car had gone to Ontario and was owned by John McLaughlin.  John had come out west to look at the car and trailered it back home to display in his antique shop.  It is is now on display in the museum in St. Catherine's.   

 

It remains a mystery how Canadian Oldsmobile #1 would have ended up doing service on Vancouver Island.

 

1881315742_1905OldsMalahatRun.jpg.ffd7f7b5adcb20e7531c6d03cb61a4c7.jpg

                              Jim Leir and daughter Brenda finishing a rainy Malahat Challenge.

 

 

454579027_1905OldsmobileOrsted.jpg.b74dc11e64807a75fe6cc1bd82ce38f9.jpg

                                                 Lloyd Orsted and Lois Dyck in an Okanagan parade.

 

1412386325_1905Oldsmobile.thumb.jpg.a8567d12bc083cb73ef0e8b7dcadc4af.jpg

  Moving into the St. Catherine's museum.                                        (photo by fatthoron on deviantart.com)

 

 

I had a great chat with Fred Bell junior yesterday and he was able to shed a little light on the story of this Olds.

 

Fred told me that it was actually Ram MCGladery's twin brother, Gerald, who recovered the engine and frame.  And it wasn't in the dump, it had been pushed over the side of the road just off the ferry ramp on Gabriola Island.  It wasn't much more than engine and frame and they didn't know what sort of vehicle it had been.  There was some thought that it may not have been a car at all since there was no evidence of mounting points for spring shackles.  It wasn't until later that they were able to get a positive ID as Oldsmobile.  This happened when a fellow walked into the body shop that McGladery had and said he recognized it because he'd had an Oldsmobile just like it.

 

After acquiring the Olds, Fred Bell set about researching the car and locating or fabricating many missing pieces.  Fred's research found that the car had originally been sold in Cowichan Station on Vancouver Island, to a fellow named Robert McClay(?).  Fred junior remembers going with his dad to visit an older gentleman on Saltspring Island whose father had owned the Olds at some point.  This fellow recalled sitting in the rear seat, confirming that that car had a removable tonneau.

 

It's pretty amazing that Fred Bell was able to save this car given the limited remains that were found.  It was long before the Internet age and even now spare parts for an early "french front" Olds would be hard to find.  Fred used available parts which could be adapted or somehow made to fit and also fabricated parts based on the pictures he was able to find.  Interestingly, it turned out that Paul Bolam had found the pedals and steering box on Gabriola years before, so these were reunited with the frame for the restoration.

 

There was no transmission at all, so Fred made one from various parts he had around.  He also made the radiator from scratch.  The body was built by Alex McGladery (Ram's father) based on pictures of a car they located in Washington.  This was almost certainly the John Hendry Olds that is shown back on page one of this thread.  Once the body was finished, Fred's wife did the upholstery.  Fred Bell junior has many good memories of riding in the Olds as a child and told me what he always wanted was a chance to drive the car.  Unfortunately it was in Murray Gammon's museum before he was old enough to get that chance.

 

Thanks to Fred Bell junior for adding more to this story.  We're fortunate to be able to get a lot of these B.C. car stories from folks who remember them first-hand.

 

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Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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Sticking with Oldsmobiles here, I found an article that my dad wrote about the John Hendry Olds which was in the 1949 PNE parade photo early in this thread.  Dad was a wealth of information when it came to B.C. and transportation.  In the 1980s he worked with the B.C. Museum of Transportation as they gathered together many significant B.C. vehicles, including this Olds.  The article is a little long, but it tells the whole story very well.

 

                                        STORY OF AN AUTO -- 1905 OLDSMOBILE   ... by Lorne Findlay

 

The 1905 Oldsmobile was purchased by John Hendry of Vancouver, B.C.  Mr. Hendry was the owner of Vancouver's first industry, the Hastings Sawmill.  He was one of B.C.'s  enthusiastic early automobilists and an active member of early Automobile Clubs both at home and abroad.   The Oldsmobile was registered in B.C. on February 23rd, 1906 and was given the licence number 62, it being the sixty-second car registered in the province after the passage of the Motor Vehicle Act in 1904.  (Oddly enough Mr. Hendry had registered another car on Feb. 20th, three days earlier, receiving licence # 60.)

 

In the same year that the Oldsmobile was registered a group of Vancouver motorists started to get together for outings with their autos.  This group was to become the Vancouver Auto Club in 1907.  Their first outing as a group was a tour around Vancouver's famous Stanley Park on Labour Day, 1906.  John Hendry and family members were driven on this tour in his 1905 Oldsmobile and his other car.  He employed a chauffeur-mechanic named Harry Hooper who later formed one of Vancouver's first taxicab companies.  I think that the little Oldsmobile  runabout stayed in service only for a short while as larger, multi-cylindered cars were soon in service.   The car, however, was kept in storage by the Hendry family until the late 1920s.

 

By the mid-1920s Vancouver's first auto wrecking yard had been established.  Service Auto Wrecking, located on Main Street in downtown Vancouver, was owned and operated by a Mr. Yuklowitz.  His son Dan told me that his father had an arrangement with a scrap collector who wandered the back alleys of the city picking up bits of salvage.  It had been arranged that this chap would put Mr.  Yuklowitz on to any derelict cars that were likely candidates for the Wrecking Yard.  Often they could be had for the taking.  One day this man came into Mr.  Yuklowitz's office and told him of an old car that could be had "but," he said "you'll have to pay money for this one.  The people want $5.00 for it and I'll have to have a finder's fee -- $2.00".  So Service Auto Wreckers paid $7.00 in 1927 for the Hendry Oldsmobile and hauled it to the scrap yard.

 

Once there Mr. Yuklowitz looked the car over and came to the conclusion that there was no point to scrapping the car as nobody would be looking for parts for a car that old any longer (no old car collectors yet).  He pushed the car to the back of the lot and there it sat through the next three decades.

 

By the mid-30s Mr.  Yuklowitz's two sons, Charlie and Dan, were working with him in the salvage yard.  Dan says he never had any interest the Oldsmobile but his brother Charlie thought it was great and got it running on occasion to use in various parades.  The B.C. Transportation Heritage Centre has three trophies won by the car in various Pacific National Exhibition events in the late thirties and early forties.  A photograph shows Charlie and a fellow employee dressed up as females driving the little car in a parade.  Another shows Charlie as a clown at the wheel.  

 

1395701723_1905OldsAutoWreckers.thumb.jpg.293052b652d126f2e8e915440fa5c288.jpg

 

 

During these pre-war times two significant opportunities were presented to Mr.  Yuklowitz regarding the runabout.  James Melton, the famous American singer / car collector, visited Vancouver and attempted to purchase the car for a reputed $5,000.  For some reason that remains a mystery his offer was turned down.  Later, son Charlie had a proposed deal with General Motors.  A friend of Charlie’s told me that G.M. was going to give them $10,000 and a new G.M. car .  In the deal Charlie and this friend were to put the car on the friend's Federal truck, travel through the U.S.  showing the car at Oldsmobile Dealers en route, delivering it finally to the factory in Lansing.  Apparently Mr.  Yuklowitz turned this deal down also and told Charlie that he didn't like him even running the vehicle.


So it sat, finally put into better storage at a nearby house.  It was pressed into service for one more P.N.E.  parade in the late 1940s.  By then there was a handful of Vancouver and Victoria men collecting old cars in an informal way.  No car clubs had been established but a parade like the P.N.E.  would bring out a few of them.

In the 1950s an interest grew in old cars and the first vintage car club was formed in the Vancouver area.  Those of us who were in the club in the early years remember the stories of the 1905 Oldsmobile that was owned by Service Auto Wrecking but that was not available under any circumstance and had only been seen by a few in the last decade.  I never got to see it but was well aware of it.
 
By the 1960s Charlie and Dan Yuklowitz operated the salvage yard and Charlie took control of the Oldsmobile as Dan still wasn't interested in it.  Charlie also collected some other cars and had a property some miles from Vancouver on B.C.'s  Sunshine Coast.  He would take his collector cars there for storage.  One foggy, rainy day he was carrying one old car on the deck of a truck and towing another behind it to his property.  He had pulled to the side of the road and was checking some problem at the rear of the towed car when an oncoming car failed to see him in the rain and drove into him.  Charlie was killed.

 

Subsequently the family sold the 1905 Oldsmobile to Mr.  Ed Shaw of Kamloops, B.C.   Ed had known Charlie and had tried earlier to buy the car.  So the Olds moved to Kamloops.  Ed Shaw made some improvements to the car - mostly cosmetic I believe.  I think he had little success running it but showed the car at various events in the early 1970s.  In 1975 there was a giant gathering of old cars in Calgary, Alberta, when a cross Canada tour and an International meet coincided.  I attended this event driving my 1926 Auburn to Calgary and back.  At this car gathering I laid eyes on the 1905 Oldsmobile for the first time.  I photographed the car but did not see it run and was told later that it wasn't off the trailer that it came on.  I was impressed with it nonetheless and it was one of the oldest autos there.  I was happy to see it put on display at last.

 

Sometime later I heard the disappointing news that Mr. Shaw had sold the Olds to a Spokane Washington man and it had left Canada.  As I dislike seeing any cars with good Canadian history leaving our country I regretted that someone in B.C. hadn't managed to acquire it.

 

Into the 1980s the car remained in Spokane changing owners once.  As I understand it neither of the American owners were able to get the engine running enough to use the car.  The second owner told me " I should never have bought an antique car - I restore Mustangs and Thunderbirds but I don't really know what makes an antique car tick.  But that's jumping ahead a bit.

 

The Olds was displayed on occasion in Spokane always being trailered to and from those occasions.  In 1982 the owner, Mr.  Robert Smathers, advertised the car for sale in one of the car hobby magazines - Cars and Parts or Hemmings, I think.   I was working for the British Columbia Museum of Transportation (now the B.C. Transportation Heritage Centre) at that time and when I saw the ad in which Mr. Smathers described the Olds as a Canadian vehicle I recognized it as the same car that had gone to Spokane from Canada.  In discussions with the President of our museum, Hall Mackenzie, we both agreed that it was important to see this historic vehicle returned to Canada.

 

Contacting Mr. Smathers by phone we arranged to go and see the car and subsequently flew to Spokane in Mr. Mackenzie’s Cessna aircraft.  Eventually the deal was made and I took our trailer to Spokane and retrieved the 1905 oldsmobile.  It has been in the museum since that time.

 

Our antique car specialist, John Reilly, took a great interest in it and made considerable repairs to the engine and transmission and had it running around the yard eventually, much to the pleasure of all of us.  Our bodyman/painter, Bill Cooke, took the wooden body and metal fenders and hood off and restored and painted them bringing the car back to its original black and red appearance.

 

1287466931_1905Olds(1984).thumb.jpg.12c398a00a404ff66b3a003a1be90248.jpg

 

The car's first important public display came in 1984 when the Vancouver Museum asked us to join them in setting up a display called " IN GEAR " which featured cars and costumes backed with photo murals depicting early B.C.  scenes that emphasized the era of each car.  In supplying most of the cars we chose the 1905 Oldsmobile to be the oldest car in the display.  The show ran for eleven months and was a great success.  The runabout was displayed in front of a photo mural of Vancouver's famous "Hollow Tree" in Stanley Park and along with the costumed figures it was a real hit.
  
Since then it has been displayed very favorably in various other showings and on television promoting the Transportation Museum.  One notable use was in our seven month show called "TRANSPORAMA" held while EXPO 86 was on in 1986.

        LORNE FINDLAY (1987)


POSTSCRIPT (1993): Sadly, the Transportation Museum project failed a few years later with a great many important artifacts being auctioned off to disappear to wherever. I was very relieved to find out that the Olds was not included in that disposal but very wisely was turned over to the Vancouver Museum, which organization already had a display of some of the belongings and part of the old home of John Hendry where the car had originally resided.

                         

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6 hours ago, PFindlay said:

By then there was a handful of Vancouver and Victoria men collecting old cars in an informal way.  No car clubs had been established but a parade like the P.N.E.  would bring out a few of them.

In the 1950s an interest grew in old cars and the first vintage car club was formed in the Vancouver area.  Those of us who were in the club in the early years remember the stories of the 1905 Oldsmobile that was owned by Service Auto Wrecking but that was not available under any circumstance and had only been seen by a few in the last decade.  I never got to see it but was well aware of it.
 

Subsequently the family sold the 1905 Oldsmobile to Mr.  Ed Shaw of Kamloops, B.C.   Ed had known Charlie and had tried earlier to buy the car.  So the Olds moved to Kamloops.  Ed Shaw made some improvements to the car - mostly cosmetic I believe.  I think he had little success running it but showed the car at various events in the early 1970s.  In 1975 there was a giant gathering of old cars in Calgary, Alberta, when a cross Canada tour and an International meet coincided.  I attended this event driving my 1926 Auburn to Calgary and back.

Thanks for the very interesting history lesson.

 

In comparison, the Alberta Pioneer Auto Club was formed by Ed Pargee in 1959, and the Edmonton Antique Car Club was formed in 1962.  Both clubs are still going strong.  I remember attending a couple of antique car shows in Edmonton at the Kinsmen Fieldhouse; one in 1968, and again in April, 1970.

 

Craig

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George may have lots to say about this one, but here's a start.  It's the 1924 Stutz Speedway Six that came out of storage in 2011.

 

The Stutz was sold to Hector Quagliotti-Romano on April 23, 1924.  Hector lived on Granville Street in the Shaughnessy area of Vancouver.  (The Stutz and my Auburn were near neighbours)  He ran the Colonial Theatre until he died in 1968.  The Speedway Six had an aluminum body, overhead valve engine, and very early hydraulic brakes.  This one had optional wire wheels and cost nearly $5000.

 

In 1927 the Stutz was sold to George Paris of Jackson Ave., but by 1929 the car belonged to the Peerless Finance Company due to an amount owing of $500.  The finance company offered it for sale for $746.44.

 

The next purchaser was Ludvig "Louis" Ostenstad, a New Westminster millworker.  He used it for 20 years before selling it to his son, John, for $1.  For John and his new bride Barbara it became the family car as they built their new home in Coquitlam.

 

Eventually John replaced the Stutz with a 1951 Dodge and put the Stutz on blocks in the garage in Coquitlam.  It stayed there until Remembrance Day, 2011 when members of George Hoffman's family completed their purchase of the car and brought it out into the daylight for the first time in over 60 years.  A crowd of about a hundred people were on hand to push, pull, takes pictures, and cheer them on. 

 

It didn't take long for George and his family to get the Stutz running again and, with a new set of tires and some minor fixing up, it has been out to some club events in recent years.

 

Here is the link to Alyn Edwards' article about the Stutz:
https://issuu.com/saanichnews/docs/nov.25-2011-inmotion
 

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Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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I used to ride my bicycle down the street past the garage where the Stutz was hidden behind the closed door. I knew the fellow living there had to be a collector because of the oil lanterns in the window of his house. I was curious what might be lurking in the garage. One day the garage door was open and I cycled right in. What a find! I have not seen many Stutzes in my life. The side of that engine looks as tall as the face of Everest. I eventually met the old owner. He was very gentle, and he wanted a lot of money for that unrestored car. 

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This 1934 Oldsmobile F34 may deserve some sort of award for having the most owners in its 85 years of existence.  It was purchased new by Ethel McKenzie in Vancouver in June of 1934.  She drove it until 1951 when she sold it to Rose Jarabeck.

 

Rose quickly sold the Olds to Hodgson Used Cars and the the car had 6 owners during 1951, all in the Chilliwack area.  Eventually Alfred Wilson of Ashcroft bought it and drove it through 1952.  It appears that it stayed in the area for quite a few years.

 

In 1985 the Oldsmobile was moved to Sydney, on Vancouver Island, and was partially dismantled.  Many unidentified parts were put into unlabelled boxes and cans - a restorer's nightmare.  Brian Pearce bought the car like this and eventually sold it to the current owner.

 

The car was well worn and poorly maintained, so much work lay ahead to get it back together and on the road.  Fortunately the wood was still solid and the restoration was completed over a three year period.  By 2004 the Oldsmobile was being toured and shown in Victoria, where it can still be seen.

 

There is an article about this car in the April / May 2004 issue of the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car.

 

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In what was undoubtedly referred to as "The race of the century" we see the Wellburn Holley, the Bell Olds, and the McGladrey Curved Dash Olds throwing caution to the wind.  It was the 1971 VCCC May Tour in Nanaimo and the location was the Grandview Bowl.

 

The first picture below was a warmup run, and it appears that Fred Bell was having a little trouble with the Olds.  (I guess he didn't quite make it around to the pits.)  I'm told this was the very first time out for this car and he was still working the bugs out.  The second picture shows the race underway and the third shows the outcome.

 

And in a subsequent event, we have the green Napier taking on the yellow Hupmobile.  Anyone want to guess how that one went?

 

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Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, PFindlay said:

In what was undoubtedly referred to as "The race of the century" we see the Wellburn Holley, the Bell Olds, and the McGladrey Curved Dash Olds throwing caution to the wind.  It was the 1971 VCCC May Tour in Nanaimo and the location was the Grandview Bowl.

 

The first picture below was a warmup run, and it appears that Fred Bell was having a little trouble with the Olds.  (I guess he didn't quite make it around to the pits.)  I'm told this was the very first time out for this car and he was still working the bugs out.  The second picture shows the race underway and the third shows the outcome.

 

And in a subsequent event, we have the green Napier taking on the yellow Hupmobile.  Anyone want to guess how that one went?

 

906440215_race1.thumb.jpg.6914c6275a6c59c398cfb2f3201ded05.jpg

 

 

553912284_race3.thumb.jpg.1f442c407c9b6422da660b336c1cf7d4.jpg

 

 

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Further to the One cylinder race, there actually was a fourth entry. Mike Simmons was riding a vintage bicycle dubbed “ The Spirit of Alcohol”. He did hold the lead at one point, until the chain fell off and he was unable to continue. 

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Richard Roberts put me on to this one:  the 1909 McLaughlin from the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island.

 

This car was purchased in 1909 by Thomas Knight and had B.C. plate #2899.   The address was Point Holmes, Comox, which is where the Knight family farm was located.  Thomas was the son of John Knight who was one of the first settlers of the Comox Valley.   Knight Rd. is named for the family.

 

Thomas used the McLaughlin as a hire car or taxi and would sometimes transport visiting lumber executives.  He renewed the car's licence until 1917.  The car must have sat unused for many years, maybe on the Knight farm?, and fell into considerable disrepair.

 

Eventually, in the 1940s a local collector bought the car.  In the 1980s the McLaughlin was acquired by the B.C. Transportation Museum in New Westminster.  When that collection was dispersed it was returned to the city of Comox.  In 1999 it was restored by Crown Isle and later displayed at the Crown Isle Museum.   As of 2018, it appears to be on display at the Comox Centre Mall. 

 

Does anyone have better pictures or more information about this car?

 

Here is an article about the McLaughlin:

https://www.mycomoxvalleynow.com/38634/towns-old-buick-on-permanent-display-at-comox-mall/

 

610703851_1909McLaughlin.jpg.45219fc84d2f7737f24cc6e00011a2c5.jpg

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I'm told that John Reilly's 1913 Cadillac is another B.C. car that has survived.  It may have belonged to the Dunsmuir Family or their coal mining company Canadian Collieries.  Richard Roberts remembers seeing the car in a dilapidated garage near Royston around 1959.  At the time it belonged to Ken Ford and Richard was not able to persuade him to sell the car.  He was also not able to convince him that the garage was going to fall in on the car.  Eventually that's what happened and the car was moved to a location near Willow Point, still not for sale.

 

In the 1980s John Reilly somehow managed to buy the Cadillac and began a full restoration.  The picture below shows it on its first Antique Chapter tour in 1989.  The top hadn't been done yet.  John drove that car for the next 20 years and he drove it pretty hard, but when it broke he'd fix it and get back out there.  He and Bess were regulars at all of our events and they also took in as many HCCA tours as they could manage.  Sadly, we've lost them both now.  The Cadillac has been off the road pretty much since John died, but it's still in the family and hopefully we'll see it out again at some point.

 

 

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I don't generally have much to add to this thread. However, I do wish to thank all, especially PFindlay, for all the wonderful remembrances and photographs they have shared here. The history of our hobby is important also. We owe a debt of gratitude to those that brought the hobby forward to us, and all the wonderful cars that they saved for us. Their area in Canada is far enough removed from where I have lived my life that I never really knew these people, or their cars. But reading about them reminds me of the many people I have known and/or met in those years long ago in my life. Seeing the pictures and reading the stories of the cars they restored are so alike many people and cars I have known.

Thank you.

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The Dunsmuirs were among B.C.'s most prominent families in the 1800s and early 1900s.  According to Wikipedia, Robert Dunsmuir, the coal mine owner and railway builder, was B.C.'s richest man for a time.  He built Craigdarroch Castle in Victoria for his wife, Joan.  Robert died in 1889.

 

James Dunsmuir was Robert and Joan's eldest son.  He inherited the coal company and the E & N Railway and also served as B.C.'s premier and Lieutenant Governor.  He built Hatley Castle in Victoria and it was he who we believe purchased John Reilly's Cadillac (above).  James died in 1920 but his wife Laura lived until 1937.   They had three sons and nine daughters.

 

In 1936, the Dunsmuir family ordered McLaughlin Phaetons for three of the daughters.  They were special ordered and took almost a year to arrive in Victoria.  In 1937 the three cars were used as official cars during the visit of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt.  It is not known why these cars were chosen, although some have speculated that it happened because of the close ties between the Dunsmuirs and Eric Hamber, the Lieutenant Governor of the day.

 

Of the three cars, only one is known to be  still in B.C.  It was purchased for Elinor Dunsmuir.  Born in 1887, Elinor was the ninth child of James and Laura and she was a bit of a black sheep in the distinguished family.  She spent time in Europe and from all accounts lived a fairly free and colourful life over there.  (In recent years it has been discovered that she was a music composer and some of her music has been found and presented.)

 

The other two cars did not survive very well.   One was wrecked while still in the possession of the daughters.  Its engine was removed and used at a sawmill and the rest ended up in a wrecking yard in Kamloops.  The remains were purchased and restored in Kamloops before being sold to an American buyer.  The other was last seen at the Plimley's used car lot in Victoria and it is not known what happened to it.

 

Elinor Dunsmuir died in 1938.  She had been sick for a while and never really got to use her McLaughlin.  During the war it was sold to Mr. Allan Douglas Ford, who was a friend of the family.  He named the car Elinor in her memory.  

 

Former VCCC member Dave Botting used to see the McLaughlin in regular use in Victoria.  He knew Allen Ford because their families were friends.  Dave was always impressed with the sight and power of the big straight eight.  He made sure that Ford knew he was interested in the car.

 

According to Dave, Allen Ford called him in 1955 and said that the car was going to be sold to a car dealer who wanted to turn it into a taxi.  By this time Dave and his wife were living in Manitoba so they took the next bus to the west coast and bought the car.  It was winter, but they drove it home anyways and discovered firsthand the lack of heating as they travelled through -30 degree cold.

 

Dave and Alyce owned the car for almost 50 years.  They drove it to Prince Edward island and to the Buick 75th event at Flint Michigan.  Another trip took them to California.  It was a great car for them.  As he neared 100 years old, Dave passed the car on to his son and it is still in the family.

 

There is an article about this car in the April / May 2002 issue of the VCCC magazine the Vintage Car.

 

And here is a link to a recent article about the car:

 

https://www.timescolonist.com/life/dunsmuirs-luxury-car-ferried-fdr-during-victoria-visit-1.1974882

 

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In 1909 Alfred Edward (Ted) Watts purchased this 1903 City & Suburban Special Touring Phaeton.  Watts (with a name like that he'd have to own an electric car) was a lumber baron who lived in the Kootenays.  He lived in his namesake town of Wattsburg, about 12 miles from Cranbrook.

 

The C & S Phaeton was built in London using the Columbia Electric design.  It had a maximum speed of 26 mph and was good for 70 - 100 miles on a single charge.  I'm not sure how the car ended up in B.C.  Perhaps Watts purchased it from England.  He used it to drive into Cranbrook and back.

 

Around 1918 Watts Watts moved the car to his fox farm at South Slocan where it was stored in an outbuilding until 1947 (Watts died in 1937).  At that time Nelson Transfer knew of the car and asked if they could use it in the Nelson Jubilee Parade.  After replacing the batteries they apparently were able to drive it in the parade.

 

The driver on that day was John DeGirolamo and his passengers were his wile and children.  They won first prize in the decorated automobile section.  After the parade the car went back into its Slocan storage while the family tried to sell it.  They had a hard time finding an interested party but eventually Roy Mills (perhaps a family member?) purchased it.

 

In 1965 Rick Percy heard about the car and went to take a look at it.  He was immediately taken by its age, condition, and completeness.  Only the batteries and lights were missing.  Rick purchased the car and kept it until 2014.  He did much research and repaired some things.   It was on display at the Port Moody Museum for a few years and was also displayed at the Expo 86 show.  The current owner (that's a good term for an electric car) is now restoring it in Maple Ridge.

 

Below is a link to an article about this car, including speculation about the possibility that the original owner could have been the Prince of Wales as reported by the Cranbrook Prospector in 1909.   The pictures below show the car in the 1947 Nelson parade and under restoration in 2017.

 

https://gregnesteroff.wixsite.com/kutnereader/post/electric-cars-of-kootenay-boundary-an-electric-car-fit-for-a-king

 

 

225295501_CS1.thumb.jpg.f96733f58eb0611be0deea04ca64d057.jpg

 

1437536783_CS2.thumb.jpg.f948af838147f99e5eb4017fcf49b0b6.jpg

 

 

2084573318_CS3.jpg.4adc2b9327b9d245d8cb688fac4177ce.jpg

 

 

714130364_CS4.jpg.15e62ece1926f8cd7f8d9d7a14f9a3a9.jpg

 

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On 10/21/2020 at 9:21 PM, KLF said:

My first close up exposure to brass cars was in the early 1970's. Bert Beaton was a collector that had 8-10 cars including a 1911 40hp White.

This 1923 Franklin with California top was another of Bert Beaton's cars.  I don't know its early history, but it came from Chase, B.C.  Bert and Irene drove  it a lot in the 60s and 70s.   In the 80s it ended up as part of the B.C. Transportation Museum collection.  When that collection was dispersed, the car was returned to the town of Chase, B.C. where it is still on display in the local museum.  Ken may know more about this car.

 

As well, I'm throwing in a couple of pictures of Bert and his Model Ts and another of my brother Ken with Bert's White on the 1974 Malahat Run  

 

 

465770559_1923Franklin(1966).thumb.jpg.5026b494f4469bb8604f5b9e59fd8a8c.jpg

                                                    On the 1966 B.C. Centennial Tour

 

 

franklin2.jpg.f3e246a99286dc35fe2b3f037efd7bae.jpg

                                                                           In chase, B.C.

 

 

2045062556_ModelT-Beaton.thumb.jpg.e4f459372372a51effdf90bd4d9060e7.jpg

                                    Bert Beaton exiting his Model T truck (Easter Parade 1970) 

 

1563138619_BertandIreneBeaton.jpg.f979b1bf389abab84f3300187fccffe4.jpg

                                             Bert and Irene Beaton with their Model T.

 

white.thumb.jpg.cadd5a394ca1f9144dfc86058f948f45.jpg

                             Ken taking Bert's White on the 1974 Malahat Run.  Guess which one is his wife?

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, PFindlay said:
On 10/21/2020 at 9:21 PM, KLF said:

 

This 1923 Franklin with California top was another of Bert Beaton's cars.  I don't know its early history, but it came from Chase, B.C.  Bert and Irene drove  it a lot in the 60s and 70s.   In the 80s it ended up as part of the B.C. Transportation Museum collection.  When that collection was dispersed, the car was returned to the town of Chase, B.C. where it is still on display i

I don't know much more about the Franklin however here's a few more pictures.  I did drive it on occasion. It was all original and a good runner.  The picture taken in 1965 shows Dave P's. 15 Franklin out with Bert's Franklin. The 15 was discovered by Paul Bolam a few years earlier.  It's a 6 cyl 7 passenger.

Ken

 

23 Franklin Beaton 15 Franklin Bolam.jpg

23 Franklin Bert Beaton.jpg

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While looking through an old VCCC Vintage Car Magazine (Aug / Sept 2000) I found an article about the early history of the 1915 Pierce Arrow that belonged to the Silver Brothers (shown several times early on in this thread).  It had been written some years before by Paul Bolam and was being re-printed in this 2000 magazine.  Paul wrote:

 

In 1914-15, at the San Francisco Exposition, there was on display a Pierce-Arrow Coupe-Roadster.  At the close of the Exposition, it was presented to B.T. Rogers, of Rogers Sugar Co., Vancouver , B.C.  For the next two years it was driven regularly by Mr. Rogers who then gave it to his son, Blyth.

 

Blyth Rogers drove the car until 1927 and then placed it in storage at the Nippon garage, 298 Alexander St., Vancouver.  A master mechanic of the Pierce-Arrow Motor Co., Mr. Sid Steeves discovered the car, and purchased it in 1928 for $250; he still has the bill of sale.

 

In case anyone is wondering about a "Coupe-Roadster", this car had a removable cast aluminum coupe top, with cowl, and doors.  During the summer months, the Roadster cowl, windshield and doors were installed.

 

Due to problems with the original carburetor system, Mr. Steeves fabricated an intake manifold for a Rayfield carburetor, which was of the water jacket type.  As 27" tires became hard to obtain, wheels from a Cole were substituted.  This accounts for the 26" rear, and 25" front wheels now on the car.  

 

Due to improvements in carburetion, and other modifications, this Pierce is a very powerful car, as evidenced by its feat of conquering the Pavilion Mountain road, in high gear.

 

In 1930 Mr. Steeves sold the Pierce to Mr. Silvers, for the sum of $150.  Included in the deal was a complete spare engine, transmission and front end.  The coupe top had been disposed of some time before.  Mr. Sid Steeves, now in his 71st year, has owned many fine cars: Pierce-Arrows of 1906 - 1922, Russell-Knight, 1913 Thomas, Cole, 1928-29 Cadillacs (now owned by G. Wood), 4 cylinder Cadillacs, and was fortunate in being in the automobile business since 1908. He has many interesting stories.

 

NOTE: My research suggests that Blyth Rogers died in 1920.  The Pierce Arrow may have been put into storage at that time or perhaps someone else continued to drive the car until 1927.

 

672276590_1915PierceArrow2.thumb.jpg.d0af936a78c55ecdd9ce65be86c4ddc4.jpg

 

 

67242978_1915PierceArrow1.thumb.jpg.c530ad222b989c7ad46bc0689982ec0a.jpg

 

Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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Al Ganske's 1937 Dodge was sold new by Begg Motors in Victoria.  It's a Canadian built Dodge and it remained in the original family for  decades.  Eventually Al Scholes ended up with it and had it for sale at the 1981 Coastal Swap Meet.  Al Ganske bought it from him for $1500 and made plans for a full restoration.

 

It took a few years, as things like moving and building a new shop took precedence, but eventually the car was completely stripped and everything inside and out was done.  The car was on the road by spring 1991 and has been at many shows and tours in the years since.

 

There is an article about this car in the VCCC magazine The Vintage Car October / November 1998
 

991947260_1937Dodge1.thumb.jpg.489a6c73bf8dca524aa0413ee3dff75c.jpg

 

 

1034052552_1937Dodge2.thumb.jpg.8b37acc354fcc0017a6d44de8c001dc9.jpg

 

 

98733389_1937Dodge3.jpg.d82c76693c033b1d34363fd237e374c3.jpg

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I stumbled across this story in a 1992 HCCA Gazette last night.  There doesn't seem to be a 1909 Brush in Oregon anymore  (in the HCCA at least) so maybe this car has now moved on to another location.

 

I tried to identify the original owner who was a doctor.  There were four Vernon doctors listed for 1910 - 1912 but none registered a Brush.  McLaughlin seemed to be their choice.  The leather plate shown in the photo is not original to the car.

 

223846775_1909Brush2.thumb.jpg.76711042dc9874e7f2575ddb40c56010.jpg

 

 

804202599_1909Brush.thumb.jpg.96f26823ee967b5d8beb77814a3c31a9.jpg

 

 

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20 hours ago, PFindlay said:

I stumbled across this story in a 1992 HCCA Gazette last night.  There doesn't seem to be a 1909 Brush in Oregon anymore  (in the HCCA at least) so maybe this car has now moved on to another location.

There is a 1910 Brush runabout in the WAAAM Museum in Hood River.  

 

Craig

10_Brush.jpg

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7 hours ago, dictator27 said:

How about Neil Brady-Browns Brooks steamer?

 

I spoke to Richard Roberts about the Brooks because he and Neil worked together on a number of projects.  According to Richard the Brooks was a prairie car that somehow made it out here, perhaps during the depression years.   From there it has a good B.C. history though. 

 

Here is a picture from the 1958 Fernie to Victoria tour.  The Brooks was not a particularly fast car so it had to work hard to get over some of the hills.  (I think I can, I think I can ...)  It also has almost no brakes for its weight so getting over the top of the hill didn't offer much relief.

 

Also provided here is a link to a fuzzy clip from an 8mm movie taken on the 1958 Fernie Tour.  Some of the cars from this thread appear in it.  This clip was taken as the cars climbed one of the 7 mountain passes travelled.  The Brooks is the last car shown - the one with the tow truck on his back bumper.  I mean RIGHT ON HIS BUMPER.

 

 

 

1716647170_Brooks2.thumb.jpg.6ca41a2c76a678a6e1c8c46e424f7fcd.jpg

 

 

1511816051_Brooks1.thumb.jpg.5852f2ab539355781d986e9fe00c4c12.jpg

 

LINK TO VIDEO: https://youtu.be/yFd5G_jUOzs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

This 1929 Hupmobile Model A Rumbleseat Coupe was purchased by John Reid in 1952.  John's been gone quite a while but the car is still in the family.

 

John bought the car in 1952 from a man named George A. Mackay of Vancouver. (His wife was Jenny R. MacKay.)  George worked for McLennan, McFeeley, and Prior Ltd., a wholesale hardware dealer down on Cordova Street.  I have a picture of MacKay's 1937 transfer / registration from when he purchased the car.  Its 1937 plate number was 57188.  We don't know the original owner, but the car was initially registered on April 4, 1929.   It may have been one of those Begg Motors cars.

 

During the 1960s and 70s this car was a regular at Vintage Car Club of Canada events.  Below are some pictures from the early 60s as well as more recent ones.  Also below is an article, probably from the early 60s, written by Rick Percy.  It gives all the specifications of the 1929 Hupmobile.

 

Hupp1.thumb.jpg.8ddbe13850365f5cd86857b455ad26fc.jpg

 

 

Hupp2.thumb.jpg.3331ea5b91aa59299fe54af21b8e3b2a.jpg

 

 

P1000284.thumb.JPG.a2cd05cb35eaa851c75a80b58e2ec43b.JPG

 

 

P1010913.JPG.6df6862b284d07c738df11d051d1d11e.JPG

 

 

 

1295586725_1929Hupparticle.thumb.jpg.4b5e69e73e0540a689c602ea503ce02d.jpg

 

 

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  • 3 months later...
On 11/21/2020 at 10:33 PM, PFindlay said:

While looking through an old VCCC Vintage Car Magazine (Aug / Sept 2000) I found an article about the early history of the 1915 Pierce Arrow that belonged to the Silver Brothers (shown several times early on in this thread).  It had been written some years before by Paul Bolam and was being re-printed in this 2000 magazine.  Paul wrote:

 

In 1914-15, at the San Francisco Exposition, there was on display a Pierce-Arrow Coupe-Roadster.  At the close of the Exposition, it was presented to B.T. Rogers, of Rogers Sugar Co., Vancouver , B.C.  For the next two years it was driven regularly by Mr. Rogers who then gave it to his son, Blyth.

 

Blyth Rogers drove the car until 1927 and then placed it in storage at the Nippon garage, 298 Alexander St., Vancouver.  A master mechanic of the Pierce-Arrow Motor Co., Mr. Sid Steeves discovered the car, and purchased it in 1928 for $250; he still has the bill of sale.

 

In case anyone is wondering about a "Coupe-Roadster", this car had a removable cast aluminum coupe top, with cowl, and doors.  During the summer months, the Roadster cowl, windshield and doors were installed.

 

Due to problems with the original carburetor system, Mr. Steeves fabricated an intake manifold for a Rayfield carburetor, which was of the water jacket type.  As 27" tires became hard to obtain, wheels from a Cole were substituted.  This accounts for the 26" rear, and 25" front wheels now on the car.  

 

Due to improvements in carburetion, and other modifications, this Pierce is a very powerful car, as evidenced by its feat of conquering the Pavilion Mountain road, in high gear.

 

In 1930 Mr. Steeves sold the Pierce to Mr. Silvers, for the sum of $150.  Included in the deal was a complete spare engine, transmission and front end.  The coupe top had been disposed of some time before.  Mr. Sid Steeves, now in his 71st year, has owned many fine cars: Pierce-Arrows of 1906 - 1922, Russell-Knight, 1913 Thomas, Cole, 1928-29 Cadillacs (now owned by G. Wood), 4 cylinder Cadillacs, and was fortunate in being in the automobile business since 1908. He has many interesting stories.

 

NOTE: My research suggests that Blyth Rogers died in 1920.  The Pierce Arrow may have been put into storage at that time or perhaps someone else continued to drive the car until 1927.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Trant has supplied these early pictures of the 1915 Pierce Arrow Coupe-Roadster. The first was taken during the Rogers years and was taken in front of the under-construction "Shannon" mansion at 57th & Granville in Vancouver.  This home was begun in 1913 and was to be the largest home west of Toronto.  It wasn't completed until 1925.  B.T. Rogers had died  in 1918 and the car passed on to son Blyth.  In this picture the car still has its winter top.

 

The other pictures shown here are from the years when Sid Steeves owned the car, late 1920s - 1930s.  The woman is probably Mrs. Steeves.  The winter top is still on but notice the change in wheels.

 

120838018_1915PierceSteeves2.thumb.jpg.2ded103cce0663dbcd8684359ec18b2f.jpg

 

 

1642460654_1915PierceSteeves.thumb.jpg.951b7cc95dfc241db5d8d4806b9bf7d8.jpg

 

 

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On 9/28/2020 at 8:57 PM, KLF said:

I took these 2 B&W pictures of the Silver Brothers Pierce Arrows. The roadster is 1915 and I believe the Pierce in the trailer is the 1917. After the garage collapsed the cars were taken to Carson Trucklines warehouse where these pics were taken. George Woods eventually inherited the 15. Alex Thompson inherited the 17. Both cars were eventually restored and remain in a collection in BC today. The colour picture is the restored 17.

Ken

15 Pierce.jpg

15 Pierce-1.jpg

17 Pierce Alex Thompson.jpg

Another picture from Peter shows the Silver Brother's Garage in Burnaby with both Pierce-Arrows in front and the 1913 Peerless a little further along.   Nearby Silver Street in Burnaby is named for their father, a Burnaby developer and Alderman.

 

This was probably taken in the early 1930s, before the cars went into storage.  Notice they were selling "3 star" gasoline.  In 1936 Imperial oil became a sponsor of Hockey Night in Canada and began the tradition of the "Three Star Selection" after each game.

 

461094994_SilversGarageSM.thumb.jpg.f8e4657475778e8f7d6651e38f0bce75.jpg

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