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British Columbia pre-war cars that have survived


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On 9/6/2020 at 11:40 AM, PFindlay said:

... all three cars still exist and two are still driven.  The event is the 1949 Pacific National Exhibition parade ...

By coincidence, today a friend sent me a link to film footage of several P.N.E. parades because he saw "some old cars in there."  Buried within the 40 minutes of video was this short clip of the same 1949 parade showing the three cars referred to above as well as a couple more.  Following the Stanley, Cadillac, and Oldsmobile are a 1910 Russell and, a few cars later, a 1911 Hupmobile.  Both of these were owned by Phil Foster - I'll post more about them at a later date.

 

Here's the video:

 

The full video is available on the City of Vancouver Archives website, Item : 2012-010.14

 

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We bought this 1920 Ford in Ashcroft B.C. last year from the estate of long time VCCC member Stallard McConnell. According to his son, the car had been in the area since new and he bought it from that family.

4.jpg

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from another thread:

_ _On 9/4/2020 at 8:13 AM, 1912Staver said:
 

"As far as I can tell virtually none of those cars survived.  Unless they have been sealed up in some sort of Aladin's cave the local vintage car scene has relatively few rare and exclusive cars from the 1908 - 1925 era. And quite a few of those that do exist came here from somewhere else.

I agree that there are photo's of many very interesting gars from this area. Packard's, Winton's, Napier ,a number of the more sporting teens British cars . And even the Roamer you mention. But if they do still exist I sure am unaware of them. Nor do they show up in the local club roster.

Similarly , the Horseless Carriage club roster only shows a relative handful of  local , upper middle class and better cars.  

 I think the scrappage from the mid 1920's onward must have been brutal. Particularly the depression and the WW2 era.

 

Greg"

 

 

Expand  

Greg, have you heard of the collection of 5 cars that came out of the Silver family in 1971? Apparently Wm. Silver of Burnaby, British Columbia was a property developer and when his sons Will and Hugh had passed away, these cars were bequeathed to friends & neighbors:

  1. 1913 Peerless 48-Six Torpedo
  2. 1915 Pierce-Arrow Roadster w/ cast aluminum top
  3. 1917 Pierce-Arrow Touring Car
  4. 1924 Stutz Speedway Six
  5. 1930 Stutz Blackhawk

 

source: https://www.pressreader.com/canada/vancouver-sun/20121005/282488590952153

Edited Friday at 10:48 PM by jeff_a

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1912Staver's reply:

 

"Yes , I definitely  have heard of them. The Silver  stash is the stuff of legends around here. I have seen the Peerless a few times over the years, quite a car !   The others  I have not seen with the possible exception of the Speedway Six. The last significant long term storage find locally that I am aware of

was a Speedway Six 5 or 6 years ago. They may be the same car.

None of the Pierce Arrow's are in the current local club roster. Someone like Peter Findlay ;who is far more active in the hobby  than I am ,most likely knows the current status of them.

Greg"

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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I think my original point { over in Ed's White thread } in regard to his observation that he is still finding hidden gem's on a regular basis , was that very few cars of merit have been found locally over the last 2 or 3 decades.

There are some marvelous cars in B.C. But most have been owned within and known to the vintage car community for a significant length of time.

For the newer people looking to join the hobby ; other than paying market value for a nice car , many of which rarely or ever appear for sale  on the non insider market, the selection is slim particularly if the pre - 1925 segment is considered.

In many cases newer people have little choice other than to look at the U.S. market { currently a near impossibility } and pay , pay , pay. { sales price, exchange on the $, transport and border charges }.

Other than Model T's and a few smaller similar Model T class cars , little has come up for sale that I am aware of at least for some time .  

It's not much different than 20 years ago when I went outside of British Columbia to find a Brass era project that I could afford. That turned out to be a bit of a problem child due to many missing parts and a underlying obscurity. 

Not surprising that it was something I could actually afford to buy, any more experienced potential buyer probably realized it was a very formidable undertaking. and kept looking for something more manageable.

I still keep an eye out for something that is along the lines of a " barn find ".  Not a shiny , near restored car  with a price tag to match. And not a complete disaster that needs 2 or 3 times its good condition form price tag to be a car again.

Something in the middle, however I still think I am 2 or 3 decades { at least } too late.

Greg

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This car is a 1911 Russell-Knight.  Little known in the U.S.A., Russell cars were built in Toronto by the Canada Cycle and Motor Co.  (CCM).  In 1910 Russell began producing the luxurious Russell-Knight, using Daimler built Knight sleeve valve engines for the first three years.  This car is a Model 38, with a 127" wheelbase and a 383 cu. in. 4 cylinder engine that puts out about 60 hp.  The base price for this model was $5000 but this one has several optional items including the wire wheels.  Its Vancouver price would have been closer to $6000.

 

The car was purchased in Vancouver by A. R. Fremlin who was a lawyer and later became a judge.  He kept the car licenced until 1922 before putting it into storage in his garage on the west side of Vancouver.  In 1948 a local collector managed to buy the car from him, but only after upping his offer to something like $325 because Fremlin wanted to get enough out of the car to buy an electric refrigerator.  Since then the car has been a regular participant in all kinds of club and community events and is still in the family of the second owner.   It is the only Model 38 Russell-Knight known to still exist.

 

Here is a link to the story of the Russell-Knight:

https://www.pressreader.com/canada/vancouver-sun/20110819/283845800087284

 

Below are pictures from 1948, the 1950s, and a recent picture.

 

1912830184_1911Russell-Knight1.thumb.jpg.c9e0d5f671160209f85ea1385380cb83.jpg

 

1344750201_1911Russell-Knight2.thumb.jpg.a6b97d0a519bad46c76a672420cb7d65.jpg

 

1532188786_1911Russell-Knight3.thumb.jpg.5a68019d4e456259be859915c154272d.jpg

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Greg,

You have a wonderful province with mountains rivaling the Alps in beauty, a good seaport, forests, and a nice, well-educated population. Too bad the available affordable vintage car scene isn't a little better. Hidden gems, as you say. Maybe you'll be the one to find them. For most of the last 15 years, I've had the income of an Eastern European bottle-washer, and that reduces opportunity as well. My income ramped up this year, but then some medical issues appeared & I'm on medical leave AUG, SEP and OCT, so I'm buying very few Duesenbergs the third quarter of the year.

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image.thumb.jpeg.e30ebda1da965be2dece3cafa324d2ad.jpeg

Unrestored 1913 Lafrance originally bought new by the city of Nanaimo BC, they bought two of them and both survive though the other one has been restored.

This truck still runs on the original tires and fabric radiator hoses.  Formerly of the Phil Foster collection which I believe was purchased in its entirety by Gerry and Vern Wellburn around 1962.  It remains in a private collection on the island.

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39 minutes ago, PFindlay said:

This car is a 1911 Russell-Knight.  Little known in the U.S.A., Russell cars were built in Toronto by the Canada Cycle and Motor Co.  (CCM).  In 1910 Russell began producing the luxurious Russell-Knight, using Daimler built Knight sleeve valve engines for the first three years.  This car is a Model 38, with a 127" wheelbase and a 383 cu. in. 4 cylinder engine that puts out about 60 hp.  The base price for this model was $5000 but this one has several optional items including the wire wheels.  Its Vancouver price would have been closer to $6000.

 

The car was purchased in Vancouver by A. R. Fremlin who was a lawyer and later became a judge.  He kept the car licenced until 1922 before putting it into storage in his garage on the west side of Vancouver.  In 1948 a local collector managed to buy the car from him, but only after upping his offer to something like $325 because Fremlin wanted to get enough out of the car to buy an electric refrigerator.  Since then the car has been a regular participant in all kinds of club and community events and is still in the family of the second owner.   It is the only Model 38 Russell-Knight known to still exist.

 

Below are pictures from 1948, the 1950s, and a recent picture.

 

1912830184_1911Russell-Knight1.thumb.jpg.c9e0d5f671160209f85ea1385380cb83.jpg

 

1344750201_1911Russell-Knight2.thumb.jpg.a6b97d0a519bad46c76a672420cb7d65.jpg

 

1532188786_1911Russell-Knight3.thumb.jpg.5a68019d4e456259be859915c154272d.jpg

 

Hi Peter ! That's one of the cars that first sparked my interest as a school boy, back in the early 1970's .  I got to know the owner through  his x wife who was re - married to the father of a good friend.  {Mother of the current care giver }

I was very impressed by it as a 13 or 14 year old , and it  has always  remained one of the cars I picture when I close my eyes and dream of  " Brass Cars ".

 

Greg

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Here is a local pre 1925 car  that is actually for sale. Does this look like a decent deal to anyone ?

That works out to  $27,800 U.S.D for a Black era Model T roadster. A nice enough car , but it strikes me as a wildly optimistic price.

 

Greg

 

https://abbotsford.craigslist.org/cto/d/langley-township-north-1923-can-ford/7183848003.html

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49 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

I was very impressed by it as a 13 or 14 year old , and it  has always  remained one of the cars I picture when I close my eyes and dream of  " Brass Cars ".

Me too.  With those tall fenders it was like our growth chart as we'd stand beside it as kids.   It's a dream car for me, too, but I never thought I'd own one. 

Peter

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5 hours ago, PFindlay said:

Me too.  With those tall fenders it was like our growth chart as we'd stand beside it as kids.   It's a dream car for me, too, but I never thought I'd own one. 

Peter

Some passenger cars fenders will always be tall!!   🙂

 

Craig

10hm068.jpg

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Thank you for posting the incredible film of the Silvers brothers cars. As a B.C. boy I was aware of the collection but I was too young to have been able to see them at that time. 
I have a B.C. car as well, though it’s not really a survivor like the cars you have shown. 
The White was pretty far gone but had never left BC. It received a genuine “1960s” restoration in 1966-67 and remains essentially the same to this day. Interestingly enough it has survived longer since it was restored than it did as an original car 

 

 

7FB30651-D64A-4495-8FD9-6B845E524F4C.jpeg

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43A9A378-793E-4076-8557-A2C57331E73F.jpeg

DA58E49B-3351-499B-A50E-4400E24E16C4.jpeg

Edited by 13White (see edit history)
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My 1912 Oakland 40 was discovered in Atlin BC in the mid 50's. It had been used to power a saw in the mine up there. The back of the body was gone. It was brought down to the Vancouver area and kicked around for a few years. All the drive train was there but completely worn out. In the late 1970's it was for sale again for $1200. I badly wanted a brass car. Not realizing what I was getting into I bought it. With help I rebuilt all the mechanical pieces while at the same time advertising for 12 Oakland parts in the HCCA Gazette and in Hemmings. I got very lucky. Ray Grayber in California had the same car. His had the complete body but was quite rough. He decided to make a new body for his car and sold me his. He also supplied new fenders as I didn't have any. I met with Ray at the last Harrah's Reno swap meet to pick up the parts, the year Bill Harrah died. Harry and Jimmy Blackstaff on Vancouver Island did the wood, restored the body and painted the car. It was finished in 1987 and I've been touring it ever since. I estimate that I've got over 25000 miles on it now. It's been a very good car.

Ken

 

 

Oakland 1962.jpg

oakland as found.jpg

1912 Oakland Touring.JPG

2015-08-29 19.02.40.jpg

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Beautiful Oakland!  Thanks for sharing, it’s nice to see some of Jimmy Blackstaff’s talents on display.  He was a friend and mentor and was an absolute master at turning what most would consider absolute junk back into flawless art.  A very skilled man who had a quiet demeanour and let his work speak for him.  He restored literally hundreds of items in his short 57 years from steam tractors, engines, full size and model locomotives, cars, fire trucks, the guy never stopped.  Hard to say just how many cars he did for members of the VCC, they never really kept track. He left an amazing legacy behind for many future generations to enjoy what he saved from the scrap pile.

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Here is a B.C. car with a great story involving an eccentric spinster, a parrot, and a Chinese gardener.  

 

This 1911 Hupp-Yeats electric was purchased in Victoria by James Keith Wilson, manager of the bank of British Columbia and real estate developer.  He had built a mansion on Burdett St. in Victoria and lived there with his wife Mary and daughter Victoria Jane Wilson.  Victoria Jane's closest companion was her parrot named Louis, which she had received when she was 5 years old.

 

Keith Wilson was extremely protective of his daughter and bought the Hupp-Yeats for her.  Victoria Jane was very shy and it was an attempt for her to get out and around a little, safely accompanied by Louis, of course.   Apparently it was a short lived experiment and the car was driven very little.

 

Victoria Jane lived in the mansion long after her parents died, along with Louis and an assortment of other birds.  The Hupp-Yeats remained in the garage.  Upon her passing in 1949, it was discovered that she was worth about a half million dollars and her will stated that Louis was to remain in the house under the care of her Chinese gardener, with a $200 per week stipend.  Basically, her money went to charity but her property, including the car, went to Louis.  This arrangement continued until 1965 when developers finally won out.  Louis died in 1967 at the age of 105, still in the care of Wah Wong, the gardener.

 

I'm not sure how or when the car changed hands but it is now at the Reynolds-Alberta Museum in Wetaskiwin, Alberta.  Maybe someone else knows the rest of this story.

 

Here is a link to the story of Victoria Jane and Louis:  http://evelazarus.com/wah-wong-and-the-parrot/

 

Below are pictures from the 1950s, in the garage, and current.

 

Hupp-Yeats.thumb.jpg.c4a9e2d6c8ae5fccabd4d73fbeabe3d0.jpg

 

Hupp-Yeats_Electric_Coach_1912.jpg.782240e91caff563566435ec0470206c.jpg

 

Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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On 9/8/2020 at 9:16 AM, 1912Staver said:

I think my original point { over in Ed's White thread } in regard to his observation that he is still finding hidden gem's on a regular basis , was that very few cars of merit have been found locally over the last 2 or 3 decades.

There are some marvelous cars in B.C. But most have been owned within and known to the vintage car community for a significant length of time.

For the newer people looking to join the hobby ; other than paying market value for a nice car , many of which rarely or ever appear for sale  on the non insider market, the selection is slim particularly if the pre - 1925 segment is considered.

Yes, I agree that it's not likely that you'll stumble across a previously undiscovered "whatever" in B.C. these days.  But Ed's White wasn't undiscovered either.  A collector had it and when he was ready to sell word got to Ed via the insider market, as you say.   Similarly,  we may be at a point in the years ahead where some of the long term owners of early B.C. cars decide it's time to part with them.  They probably won't end up on Craigslist though so my advice is to stay connected and keep an eye out for anything that may pop up.  And there aren't likely to be any bargain basement deals because the owners will know the value and there will be someone willing to pay it.

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1 hour ago, PFindlay said:

Yes, I agree that it's not likely that you'll stumble across a previously undiscovered "whatever" in B.C. these days.  But Ed's White wasn't undiscovered either.  A collector had it and when he was ready to sell word got to Ed via the insider market, as you say.   Similarly,  we may be at a point in the years ahead where some of the long term owners of early B.C. cars decide it's time to part with them.  They probably won't end up on Craigslist though so my advice is to stay connected and keep an eye out for anything that may pop up.  And there aren't likely to be any bargain basement deals because the owners will know the value and there will be someone willing to pay it.

I can see that with the higher end cars on the Lower Mainland and around Victoria on the Island.  To a lesser degree, there must be a few still hidden away in the Okanagan interior somewhere.

 

Craig

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My 1927 Dictator (sorry, no photo - it is spread all over my garage at the moment), was sold new by Jameson Motors in Victoria. The dealer tag is still on the dashboard.  There is a 1917 Studebaker SF4 touring in the Surrey Museum. It spent about 10 years as a jitney between New Westminster and the Fraser Valley community of Haney before being sold to a saw mill which used the engine to run a saw for about 40 years.  It was restored in the late 60's.  It is now a static display on the second floor of the museum.

The Vancouver Electric Vehicle Association owns a 1912 Detroit Electric which was purchased new in Victoria by Mrs. Florence French.  Unlike the Hupp Yeats above, this cart was in regular use by Mrs. French until the late 1950's.  I grew up in the Victoria area and can remember seeing this car when I was about 7 years old.  Mrs. French lived at the Empress Hotel for many years and the hotel staff maintained it for her.  It is now on permanent display at BC Hydro's Stave Lake Powerhouse Museum which also dates from 1912.

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11 hours ago, Modeleh said:

Beautiful Oakland!  Thanks for sharing, it’s nice to see some of Jimmy Blackstaff’s talents on display.  He was a friend and mentor and was an absolute master at turning what most would consider absolute junk back into flawless art.  A very skilled man who had a quiet demeanour and let his work speak for him.  He restored literally hundreds of items in his short 57 years from steam tractors, engines, full size and model locomotives, cars, fire trucks, the guy never stopped.  Hard to say just how many cars he did for members of the VCC, they never really kept track. He left an amazing legacy behind for many future generations to enjoy what he saved from the scrap pile.

Very well said; I knew Jimmy my whole life and felt the same as you. He was incredible with his talents and knowledge. And an awesome guy on top of that!!

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3 hours ago, dictator27 said:

The Vancouver Electric Vehicle Association owns a 1912 Detroit Electric which was purchased new in Victoria by Mrs. Florence French.  Unlike the Hupp Yeats above, this cart was in regular use by Mrs. French until the late 1950's.  I grew up in the Victoria area and can remember seeing this car when I was about 7 years old.  Mrs. French lived at the Empress Hotel for many years and the hotel staff maintained it for her.  It is now on permanent display at BC Hydro's Stave Lake Powerhouse Museum which also dates from 1912.

Yes, the French car is a good addition to the collection here.   Below is a recent picture of the car and here is a link to its story:

 

https://www.autotrader.ca/newsfeatures/20170804/the-105-year-old-ev-that-still-runs-today/

 

 

1912 Detroit Electric.jpg

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Mrs Frenchs Detroit Electric was another car from the Phil Foster collection later became the Wellburns. Vern told me they donated it and the Lafrance to the Cloverdale museum.  When the museum closed the original battery charger to the car went missing and the car went to the care of the electric car club.  Vern was just disgusted that the museum people lost that battery charger.

A list of the Phil Foster/Wellburn cars:

1904 Holley

1910 Russell

1911 Stanley

1912 Detroit 

1913 Lafrance 

can anyone help add to it I think there was more?

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Phil Foster was one of the early collectors in B.C.  In the 1940s and 50s he ran the Speedway Service Station in Victoria and spent many hours searching down and saving cars that would have been destined for the scrap yard, hoping to someday open a museum.  Here is a link to the Phil Foster story:  http://antique.vccc.com/pioneers/foster/fostercontents.html

 

This RHD 1912 Model T Touring, which he name Elizabeth,  was one of his favourites.  In 1958, when the Vintage Car Club of Canada had their first tour he drove the Model T through Washington State to Fernie, where the tour started, then back to Victoria as part of the tour.  It was a 1300 mile round trip.  When Phil sold his cars in the early 1960s (due to failing health)  Elizabeth was donated to the Royal Victoria Museum where it remains today.

 

Here is a series of photos depicting the removal of the 1912 Model T from a garage in Victoria circa 1950.  It's an interesting glimpse of what it was like to recover a barn find car in those days.  The last B&W picture was taken on the 1958 Fernie Tour.  The colour picture is at the museum.

 

02.thumb.jpg.e732d3b8e05a54971cb79deaf085ecf0.jpg

 

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Elizabeth.thumb.jpg.a45529bcd23c55559c9751dd9c5c2a31.jpg

 

 

 

Image6.thumb.jpg.348b98d9132ac8567249fdee65005786.jpg

 

1020712657_Elizabethinmuseum.jpg.c55c0eb717361ed2d909e1ab54c58c97.jpg

 

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Interesting that Phil worked at the Dandridge Garage..that used to be at the end of my street...also interesting that they are the same family that produced music producer David Foster and race car driver Billy Foster.

Dandridge jpeg.jpg

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Thanks for starting this thread Peter. It is an interesting read. I will add another original BC car to the discussion. Our 24 Nash Sport touring is a long term B.C. car. I have copies of B.C. registrations back to 1924. We appear to be the fifth owners of the car. The first registration is from Arthur John Wixey who was a confectioner is Victoria. Long term Victoria car club members described Wixey as a gentleman who drove the car and worn spats long after they fell out of fashion. At one time Mr. Wixey cut out the rear of the touring body to carry his pies. The Nash was acquired from Mr. Wixey in the early 1950's by Robert (Bob) Genn a well known B.C. Artist from Victoria. I spoke with Bob Genn before he passed in 2014 about the car. When he was in Victoria he spent a lot of time chasing down and acquiring local antique cars. Bob sold the Nash in 1956 or 57 to B.C. old car connoisseurs Al and Millie Johnson.  We obtained the car from Al and  Millie in the mid 1980's.  I noted a lot of the cars in this thread started their BC life from Begg motors and I believe this car likely was sold by them as well. A Nash Car Club resource shows that Begg Motors at 1062 Georgia Street in Vancouver was the Nash dealer in Vancouver from 1922-1926. It shows the Victoria location of Begg Motors selling Nashes in 1928.

our 24.jpg

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21 minutes ago, Eldovert said:

Interesting that Phil worked at the Dandridge Garage..that used to be at the end of my street...also interesting that they are the same family that produced music producer David Foster and race car driver Billy Foster.

Dandridge jpeg.jpg

Yes, the family made their mark in B.C. for sure.  

 

That's a good picture of The Motor House and a nice bit of history.  The car on the left is a Mitchell which was registered to Dandridge himself.    Beside that is an EMF.  Do you have a better copy of the car in the building to see its plate number? 

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30 minutes ago, Eldovert said:

Hi Peter,

The number appears to be 3739 or 5739

Cheers,Pat

Thanks.  5739 would be a White so that's not it  3739 was a McLaughlin registered to W. J. Dandridge so that's the car.  Maybe a brother?

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21 hours ago, Modeleh said:

Mrs Frenchs Detroit Electric was another car from the Phil Foster collection later became the Wellburns. Vern told me they donated it and the Lafrance to the Cloverdale museum.  When the museum closed the original battery charger to the car went missing and the car went to the care of the electric car club.  Vern was just disgusted that the museum people lost that battery charger.

A list of the Phil Foster/Wellburn cars:

1904 Holley

1910 Russell

1911 Stanley

1912 Detroit 

1913 Lafrance 

can anyone help add to it I think there was more?

There was a Mitchell as well I believe around 1912; also the Model N Ford circa 1907

Edited by 13White (see edit history)
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I just purchased a 1938 P6 that was made in Windsor. I imagine the car was sold to a Canadian citizen when new. Who would l talk to about the history of the Windsor factory? Canadian cars seemed to have different options, color codes Engines etc. My email is tmtalaskanmalamutes@gmail.com 

1937 Plymouth.jpg

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27 minutes ago, 13White said:

There was a Mitchell as well I believe around 1912; also the Model N Ford circa 1907

I had forgotten about the Model N which the Nanaimo club is the caretaker of.  I never knew about the Mitchell I wonder what became of it.

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1 hour ago, 13White said:

There was a Mitchell as well I believe around 1912; also the Model N Ford circa 1907

The Mitchell was a 1912 roadster the Vern sold to Earl Tucker. The car is now in Australia and still being actively used.

Vern also had a 1912 McLaughlin Buick roadster. That's in Dave Proctor's collection now.

Also Vern had an 11?? Hupmobile roadster. That car is still in Vancouver.

These cars may all have come from the Foster collection I'm not 100% sure. I've got pictures of them on film. I'll try to track them down and post them.

Ken

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10 hours ago, KLF said:

The Mitchell was a 1912 roadster the Vern sold to Earl Tucker. The car is now in Australia and still being actively used.

Vern also had a 1912 McLaughlin Buick roadster. That's in Dave Proctor's collection now.

Also Vern had an 11?? Hupmobile roadster. That car is still in Vancouver.

These cars may all have come from the Foster collection I'm not 100% sure. I've got pictures of them on film. I'll try to track them down and post them.

Ken

Here are pictures of the 1912 Mitchell and the 1911 Hupmobile.  I believe the occasion was a Victoria Day parade in Victoria, back in the 50s.

 

34714299_1912Mitchell.thumb.jpg.56a853c365ee79a401ef02dfde5f4fbe.jpg

 

1345154352_1911Hupmobile.thumb.jpg.2c129a40e6f9c7c5528bb12be0dcb28f.jpg

 

 

Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, KLF said:

The Mitchell was a 1912 roadster the Vern sold to Earl Tucker. The car is now in Australia and still being actively used.

Vern also had a 1912 McLaughlin Buick roadster. That's in Dave Proctor's collection now.

Also Vern had an 11?? Hupmobile roadster. That car is still in Vancouver.

These cars may all have come from the Foster collection I'm not 100% sure. I've got pictures of them on film. I'll try to track them down and post them.

Ken

Thanks Ken; I remembered the Mitchell as it used to be on display inside the big log building at the Forest Museum. This is the same building that the Stanley was stored in the basement. I remember these as we lived right on site at the museum when my Dad worked there from 1969-71. I remember a car club event being held there, my dad was operating the steam locomotive but he  took a little break and drove the little Hupmobile in some of the car games. I may have a photo of that somewhere. It sure seems like a long time ago!

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10 minutes ago, PFindlay said:

Here are pictures of the 1912 Mitchell and the 1911 Hupmobile.  I believe the occasion was a Victoria Day parade in Victoria, back in the 50s.

 

34714299_1912Mitchell.thumb.jpg.56a853c365ee79a401ef02dfde5f4fbe.jpg

 

1345154352_1911Hupmobile.thumb.jpg.2c129a40e6f9c7c5528bb12be0dcb28f.jpg

 

 

Thanks; those are definitely the cars I remember! The first picture it sure looks like the Mitchell has a rope on the back and is towing the Hup!!!

the other thing I can clearly remember is just how beautiful that Mitchell was! 

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11 hours ago, KLF said:

The Mitchell was a 1912 roadster the Vern sold to Earl Tucker. The car is now in Australia and still being actively used.

Vern also had a 1912 McLaughlin Buick roadster. That's in Dave Proctor's collection now.

Also Vern had an 11?? Hupmobile roadster. That car is still in Vancouver.

These cars may all have come from the Foster collection I'm not 100% sure. I've got pictures of them on film. I'll try to track them down and post them.

Ken

The McLaughlin has been a favourite of Dave’s for many years; and that’s saying something in a collection like his! My favourite memory of that car was on the Malahat Challenge tour about 30 years ago. The McLaughlin developed a bit of a rod knock. So Dave nonchalantly pulled over to the side of the road, dropped the pan down with the oil still in it; pulled some shims out of the offending rod, and buttoned it back up and carried on. Nobody gives Dave Proctor any hard luck trophy lol!!!

Edited by 13White (see edit history)
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