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California Fires are causing people to buy their own Fire Trucks to protect their property Craigslist has seen a huge demand


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DIY firefighting: Californians are spending up to $69K buying their own firetrucks on Craigslist to protect themselves against the annual blazes that scorch the state

  • People are buying their own fire trucks on Craigslist following devastating lightning-sparked wildfires in California 
  • Craiglist sellers are advertising fire trucks ranging between $5,000 to $69,000
  • Sacramento company Vans From Japan, which buys trucks from Japan and sells them in California, is now cashing in on the demand by selling fire trucks 
  • Wildfires have caused insurance premiums to rise, the wealthy to hire private firefighters and fire trucks to protect their land 
  • Today more than 14,200 firefighters are battling over 20 major fires and lightning complexes across the state as 18,200 people remain evacuated 

 

People are buying their own fire trucks on Craigslist following devastating lightning-sparked wildfires in California. This seller is advertising a 53-year-old Ford fire truck saying: 'With these lightning complex fires going on, mabe you could use it'

 

 

This fire truck with a 1985 Pierce Dash Fire engine from Skywalker Ranch is on the market for $5,000

 

 

 

 

This 2013 Peterbilt water truck that 'meets all Cal Fire specs' is on sale for $69,999 in Pacifica, California

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A firetruck seems awful expensive for the utility you'd get out of it. There probably are much cheaper ways of preparing.

I have a friend who lives in the mountains in an area that could have a significant fire. First line of defense: He has a "defensible space" around all the buildings on his property. Second line of defense: He has his own well, which he needs for his house anyway. He put in a relatively large water storage tank, got some used fire hose from the local fire department (usable but not quite up to their standards) and he has a pump, etc. to use the hose and tank to fight fires.

 

But so far, what has worked very well for him is to invite the fire agencies to use his property for their incident command site or staging area as they see fit. Plenty of space for people and equipment. And they do a very good job of defending their command post and staging areas.

 

But lacking all that, from what little I have learned from talking to the wild land fire people where I volunteer in the mountains, a D8 seems like a more useful tool than a fire truck for that type of thing.

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1 hour ago, ply33 said:

 

 

But lacking all that, from what little I have learned from talking to the wild land fire people where I volunteer in the mountains, a D8 seems like a more useful tool than a fire truck for that type of thing.

 

So what happens to this guy if he destroys the kangaroo rat habitat during the fire, I'm sure that is sacred land before things start burning. 

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2 hours ago, ply33 said:

 

But so far, what has worked very well for him is to invite the fire agencies to use his property for their incident command site or staging area as they see fit. Plenty of space for people and equipment. And they do a very good job of defending their command post and staging areas.

 

 

One of my uncles did this when there was a wildfire in his area.

He let the firetrucks park anywhere they wanted, invited them to sleep inside his house wherever they could find space, instead of sleeping in their trucks or on the ground, and he let them drop hoses into his pond that is fed by a natural spring.

He had already cleared a large area with his tractor and they helped him move some of his pre-war cars there and told him their trucks would burn before his cars did.

 

Luckily they stopped the fire before it burned too much of his acreage and kept it from running down into the valley.

 

 

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Interesting discussion.   Several (6 or 7, maybe more) years ago, an elder in SPAMFAA explained that Calf was trying to limit sales of used fire apparatus.  I forget the reasons but with that state, no common sense reason is usually necessary for what they do.

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2020/09/01/907054422/diy-firefighting-in-california

Edited by CarFreak (see edit history)
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As Judge Judy says, it sounds like a lot of who shot john!  A fire truck will pump out its water tank in a few minutes. Plus the vehicle needs maintenance. A large cistern or storage tank with a pump and hose would be just as efficient. Also, rebuilding with more fire resistant materials would be helpful as well.

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How about fireproofing your buildings for a start? Clear the trees, brush, and combustibles far from the housing. Use metal roofing and siding and eliminate eaves that hold burnable leaves, etc. A fire truck would be additional insurance for sure as long as a  water supply is available. I watched a video somewhere showing a person who did survive a few wildfires by changing his housing and it also showed his neighbours houses all burnt out.

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A D8 cat would be a big help in a no to mild wind situation.  The sparks and burning combustables from a wind driven fire can carry a long long ways. Maybe an old dump truck with a big V-plow on the front for moving cars out the way when getting out Dodge. 

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Had wondered how big a water tank could be mounted on a D8. For "go anywhere" there is nothing like a track.

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A D8 can be extremely expensive to purchase, maintain and use. The big old ones of the 60's & 70's might be attractive to buy, but may likely be the cheapest part of ownership. Unless you are a heavy duty mechanic and have a second one for spare parts! A fire barrier is not a bad idea though. Perhaps hiring a contractor who owns a D8 and have him built a fire barrier around the outer edge of your properly, could be more cost effective and less headache in the long run? I've also seen a large very green manicured lawn divert a fire. 

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2 hours ago, GregLaR said:

Is this really necessary?

 

But it is “dry heat” :)

 

I have one outdoor thermometer reading 101°F and another reading 94°F. The weather channel claims and even 100°F. And I live on the beach where it never gets this hot and nobody has air conditioning.

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I've seen over 100F on my patio frequently this year. Am good for about 10 minutes in the garage during the day, most gets done from 10 pm to 7 am.

 

Nice thing about 55" or rain and a very high water table (no basements, just indoor swimming pools) is fires rarely spread out of control.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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I fought fires for 25 years and the city replaced the engine in my company three times during my service. Every engine we had had what is known as a "booster" tank. We would only use our booster hoses on small fires such as garbage cans etc. as it only held 250 gallons. If we had a structure fire the pump operator would use the booster tank to get water on the fire while we were hooking up the engine to a hydrant. That 250 gallons would only last a few minutes before we needed to switch over to hydrant water. You need copious amounts of water to fight those fires in California and a booster tank isn't going to do it. If you really want to try to fight a fire on your own, I would put in a swimming pool and pipe it so I could attach a hose. Then you would need a generator because you won't have power. Best suggestion, clear the brush from your house, follow all the guidelines suggested by the State of CA. and let the professionals fight the fire.

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I am half way between Las Vegas and Death Valley today 113° and no rain in 4 months, none predicted for the next 10 days, winds pick up on Tuesday. 

The smoke from Cali. is still hanging around. enough to smell and taste, red sun and moon.

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I lived in an area where fire was no threat at all......and I have owned more than a dozen fire trucks..........so, living in a tinderbox, it makes sense to have one. Weather or not a truck and an adequate supply of water will save your house, or cost you your life is another question. I have been in the hills, valleys, and canyons of California while major fires are burning, and the wind is blowing 20 mph. It’s nothing you ever want to see or experience in person. Last year, north of wine country we were on tour. We had a flat in a small town at lunchtime.....we stopped, ate lunch, and then fixed the flat and went on. That afternoon, a wire fell just outside the town after we left.......the next day at noon, 1/3 of the place was gone. Here we are on the 101 in “rush hour” traffic, with no cars in sight......making a run for safety in a Model J. The smoke was burning our eyes, and we were coughing and choking. Using a satellite map, it was a very reasonable calculated risk......twenty minutes after we passed, the highway was closed. I calculated 9 minutes of danger and heavy smoke.....I was wrong.....it was twenty five minutes. At the time it was our best option. What was stunning was how fast things go from keep an eye on it, to run like hell, to the house is gone.........sometimes days, sometimes hours, and sometimes only a few minutes. The smoke is ten times worse than it appears in the photo.

21F26EA6-E1B2-4116-9502-4DFA3A968BB2.jpeg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, 28 Chrysler said:

I am half way between Las Vegas and Death Valley today 113° and no rain in 4 months, none predicted for the next 10 days, winds pick up on Tuesday. 

 

 

I feel for you guys, we had a disastrous summer here - my wife and I did a few flights between Queensland, New South Wales & Victoria and it's hard to comprehend just how destructive fires are and the amount of area destroyed

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59 minutes ago, hidden_hunter said:

 

I feel for you guys, we had a disastrous summer here - my wife and I did a few flights between Queensland, New South Wales & Victoria and it's hard to comprehend just how destructive fires are and the amount of area destroyed


 

Yes.....and the scars still plainly visible twenty years later.........

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21 hours ago, Fossil said:

A D8 cat would be a big help in a no to mild wind situation.  The sparks and burning combustables from a wind driven fire can carry a long long ways. Maybe an old dump truck with a big V-plow on the front for moving cars out the way when getting out Dodge. 

 

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Matt, great video. I'd be a little concerned about that frame flexing like it does. Now, if you had a hydrant on your property, with a 5" steamer connection you might stand a chance fighting your own fire. I don't think I've ever seen an old Ahrens Fox pumping without the hood sides open to keep the engine cool. What a beautiful rig!

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THE AMOUNT OF CHASSIS FLEX -

that is amazing to watch-

 

Gretna, Louisiana's Davy Crockett Volunteer Fire Dept. has a pair of Ahrens-Fox Engines,

a 1927 and a 1947-

absolutely incredible to observe in action

 

We had our own 1951 F-6 Ford Boardman-built pumper with a 500 gallon tank alongside our home for several years and could not get a discount on homeowner insurance

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