Jump to content

1934 Plymouth Free Wheeling cable


Bruce Winters
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi, I am hoping to find a good free wheeling cable for my 1934 Plymouth PE. Mine has a crushed section and is nearly impossible to pull. I am also looking for the shorter cable that leads from the transmission to the vacuum clutch mechanism. If you have one or both that would be great. Thank you.

Edited by Bruce Winters
none (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Bruce Winters said:

Hi, I am hoping to find a good free wheeling cable for my 1934 Plymouth PE. Mine has a crushed section and is nearly impossible to pull. I am also looking for the shorter cable that leads from the transmission to the vacuum clutch mechanism. If you have one or both that would be great. Thank you.

I thought it was a rod that activated the auto clutch, connected to the gas pedal, ? If I remember, my 33 PD had it..it’s been awhile,,,,

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, knobless said:

I thought it was a rod that activated the auto clutch, connected to the gas pedal, ? If I remember, my 33 PD had it..it’s been awhile,,,,

 

 

On the '33, which I think is the same as '34, there is a cable from the dash to the transmission that has three positions: Locked out, freewheeling, and freewheeling plus automatic clutch. It attaches to a lever on the side of the transmission which moves a shifter fork that moves a collar that locks or unlocks the freewheeling.

 

Attached to that lever on the side of the transmission is a second shorter cable in a tube that goes to the spool valve on the top of the automatic clutch and basically enables/disables that the automatic clutch.

 

Also attached to the automatic clutch spool valve is a rod from the gas pedal cross shaft. If the automatic clutch is enabled via the cable from the transmission, then that rod controls the clutch engagement/disengagement.

 

All that said, I don't know of a source for replacement cables or cable assemblies. The one from the transmission to the automatic clutch is probably easier as it is a piece of thin wall tubing and the wire is pretty standard solid core, so you could make that up from commonly available materials. The one from the dash to the transmission would be much harder to fabricate using tools and techniques available in a typical home shop or garage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Handleman - Next time you are in the abyss I would really appreciate your having a look for that dash knob button cable.

 

Ply-33 - You describe exactly what I have. I am a little confused about the mention of a cable in a tube. I was thinking the shorter cable would be another boden cable like the longer cable from the dash. Because My shorter cable was gone I wasn't sure what it looked like. I like the idea of a cable in tube. The bend from the transmission arm to the spool valve is an "S" shape. The tube may hold its shape better and smoother cable action than the flexing boden cable. Are you able to take a picture of your installed 33 cables near the automatic clutch assembly?

 

Thank you both for you replies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Bruce Winters said:

. . . Are you able to take a picture of your installed 33 cables near the automatic clutch assembly?

 

My automatic clutch assembly does not work so I had it on for appearance only. However on the '33 the ignition timing mark is on the flywheel which makes it impossible to see when the automatic clutch is installed. I believe that they moved the timing mark to the crankshaft pully/vibration damper in 1934. Anyway, the result is that I don't have the unit on the car. Which in your case is a bonus because it allows a good photo of the cable and tube.

 

The tube O.D. is pretty close to 0.190" on my calipers. The raised portions of the tube help anchor it in the clamp on the automatic clutch. Not sure if it is really needed. If so you could probably solder some wire on your tube to make an equivalent.

 

 

IMG_7336.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very interesting. Thank you. I think the tubing will work much better than the bowden cable I was messing around with. I will check the od of some steel brake line and see if I can find something that will work. I like the idea of the soldered wire too. I can see how that might prevent the tubing from slipping around in the clamp. You are right about the timing mark being on the crankshaft/pulley on the PE. In addition to the PE I have a 34 PF. The timing mark on the PF is on the flywheel as your 33. With no mark on the pulley/vibration dampener. It is a different lighter looking pulley. Thank you again for the information and great advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The cable arrived today. Thank you Handleman for digging it out. I soaked it down with mineral spirits followed by another soaking in a light oil. It moves much easier than the cable I had on the car. I can't wait to try it all out. Attached are a couple pics of my project. Other than the color it is pretty much stock original. I am finalizing a mechanical restoration including a complete engine rebuild. The previous owner painted painted the car and reupholstered the interior. I am hoping to have it back 20200607_184455.thumb.jpg.300195e45b0d6fca0a301ab734fea5a5.jpgon the road some time this Fall.20200625_071642.thumb.jpg.1e0d84862ce31b3b950fa605b9f7fe5f.jpg20200625_071811.thumb.jpg.49badf6eb7b8dedecc840b8563ff4500.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks very nice Bruce, the only critique is the thing I could add was too bad when engine rebuilt you didnt do the block black and head silver hence silver dome that was the way they cane out of factory looks very nice, is the carb a 439s simple good running carburetor. When you try that freewheeling make sure your bot in the mountains they called those widomakers cause the guys were in rockys and they were engaged in mountains and the drum brakes cooked and they went off cliffs lol or at least thats the horror stories i was told.

my dad had 5 PE’s in his lifetime he said with 34 pe had the coil over suspension made the best riding plymouth till they brought it back in 39, I have a pe borderline save able or parts car I was wondering if you can tell me what the hell is the trick to get the surround and radiator out as one piece like all the other early plymouths do I have to remove the front fenders? With my health issues not sure I can swing this one the engine thats in it corroded out block but I have a good running spare stamped PE engine mine is a 4door but I have a 33 dodge dp6 long wheelbase rumble seat five window coupe

cheers send pics or video of the drive and the freewheeling operation and how it works

Regards

Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know about the black engine block. I painted this silver based on evidence the block was never painted black. I bought the car last Fall from an 83 year old gentleman who bought the car from the original owner in 1962. (The title I received was dated 1962 signed by him) Some time in the 1990's he did a cosmetic restoration of the car. At that time he changed the color from the original Palm Beach Gray to the Red you see in the photos. He did no mechanical restoration of the car. When I got it, naturally there were some oil leaks I wanted to fix. When I removed the tappet covers I saw what looked like 80 years of sludge so I decided to rebuild the engine. I believe the engine had never been apart. It was a standard bore. The pistons had the DCPC stamp on the top. Prior to removing the engine for rebuild I pressure washed the engine and quickly blew off the thin coating of silver paint that was applied during the cosmetic restoration. Underneath that was more silver paint. The machine shop further cleaned the block in preparation for the rebuild. Deep within the pores of the block casting were traces of silver paint. There was no evidence the block had ever been painted black. The man I bought the car from said the engine had always been silver since he owned it. The PE number on the block matches the PE number stamped on the frame behind the left rear wheel. Has anyone else seen what I am reporting?

 

On a 34 PF I did remove the radiator and shell as one piece without removing the fenders. It wasn't too bad of a job. First I drained it down (Always a mess). Then I removed the bumper and the six or eight bolts that attach the shell to the fenders. This will allow the fenders to spread apart just enough. Then removed the hoses, Then disconnected the rods that connect to the cowl. Then from below removed 2 large nuts that attach the shell frame to the body frame. Then tilt the entire assembly to the front and lift out. It is very heavy and you will surely need a helper. I may have forgotten some minor details but you get the general idea.

 

Luckily no mountains here in Wisconsin. Just few good sized hills. Thanks for the advice. 😀

 

The carb is a B&B. It might look a little different than most you see. It is my understanding the early version had no support gusset between the float bowl and the air cleaner attachment.

 

20200902_091015.thumb.jpg.2af98a68fcfd510b0a72b87243f0adf9.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bruce,

     well no matter what it is a beautiful Job and once on the road it will even look and drive nicer, Carburetor looks like what is on my spare PE stamped running engine, as for color all my dads PE’s were all original drivers back in the 60’s and 70’s he had and the two pe motors I have have the black block but probably in the assy line they might have run out of black no big deal your car is as original and correct as you can expect in 2020 and I love it 👍

Thanks for the tips on shell and rad removal now just to get my back healed up, so I can get back to work. And a Vaccine, Thanks for the Pics and let me know how that FW ing works out.

Regards

Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...