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1922 Buick Windshield Replacement


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Today I started working on my windshield replacement. The first thing I noticed was that the gap between top and bottom sections was not even.  I showed a 1/16" gap on the Rt side and a 3/16" gap on the left (Drivers) side. I removed both top and bottoms sections from the larger stanchions and the I noticed that the bottom piece of glass was actually some very old safety glass as the glass had begun to delaminate and get bubbles around the edge. Also at the ends of the plate glass where a portion was removed for the end caps to fit, the cut was very roughly done.  So it seems that the bottom portion of my windshield may have been replaced in the 30s/40s sometime.  The fact that the glass was not installed evenly was also my first clue that a piece may have been replaced.  The top piece was still sheet glass and was not laminated safety glass.

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Here are two pictures of the glass setting tape used to put my glass in place.  The heavier dark tape is what came out of the top original piece of glass.  It seems to be a 100% cloth tape with some very small hard rolled paper material on the edges that would be exposed.  The second photo is the thinner tape used to install the safety glass in place.  It too is thin cloth material with no rolled edge.   The third photo is a closeup of the top (original) glass setting tape.

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Top winshield close-up.jpg

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Mark,

If I am not mistaken, I think a person can get what is called 'glass setting channel' for an application like this.  I'm sure your local glass shop can help you out with this.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have removed this lower seal (what was left) and had the frames glass beaded to clean them up.  The lower seal appeared to be just a flat seal that laid up against the lip on top of the cowl.   When I looked at the replacement seal I ordered from Steele, the seal is  "V" shaped seal with one side longer then the other.  I am trying to figure out how this is supposed to be installed in this small groove on the bottom of the windshield frame?   It appears like I may have to cut the new seal down the center to try and fit that into the groove?? 

 

Does anyone have a photo about installing this new lower windshield to cowl seal?

lower seal closeup.jpg

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new lower seal.jpg

lower windhsield seal at cowl original.jpg

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Mark, 

     In cross section I have seen that upside down V shape used on windshields, but normally for a "fixed" window on a cowl and not a moveable windshield.  Do you think you are supposed to use that or just the single straight style with one end thicker to go into the groove?  

Use a tire lubricant like Ru Glide or Bullsnot to slide the rubber into the groove.     Hugh

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Hugh,

 

I don't think I can use that seal for anything.  I may just get a truck tire tube and cut it to glue in the groove.  I don'y really have any better idea than that

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Mark:

 The V seal is what goes in the 1924-1925 windshield frames. The 1921 -1922 has a T shaped seal similar to what you removed. That it because your bottom unit can pivot. The channel on the bottom of my frames are about 1/2" wide. That unit stays fixed. The V seal was quite a fight to get it into that 1/2" space.

 I typed this on Saturday evening but forgot to send it.

What is the distance from the frame to the cowl? I thought I had a piece left over from doing the upper windshield sides which I trimmed them down to fit. The left over rubber pieces came from Tom Black who had 2 1917 Buicks, a 1921 model 44 and a 1923-49. Can't find it now so I do not know how wide it was originally.

 Bob's lists 3 widths;(root) 3/4", 1" and 1 1/2"  Page 96. 1 1/2"is $4.00/ft.

Restoration Specialties shows the same sizes. 2016 Catalog is $3.50/ft.

 2020 Snyder's Model T and A catalog has # T7840 Web is .235 wide@ T X1.280 tall X43" long. $3.50 each.

Edited by dibarlaw (see edit history)
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Mark, 

    Following up on Larry's note.  WWW.restorationspecialties.com   Top of page 46.  You could get some samples and see if they match what you pulled out.    Hugh

 

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Thanks Larry and Hugh,

 

I had located the same universal rubber seals on the Steele site but I ordered the 1 1/2" size from Restoration Specialties since they are a bit cheaper. I also ordered another style from MAC's Model T parts.

 

The gap is about 3/4" on my car but by the time you slide the seal up into the frame, I'm thinking the 1 1/2" size will be a better fit.

 

So now I have a new V shaped seal if you need one.

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Mark:

 I will talk to you about the V seal as the one on my Standard was probably put in when the car was "fixed up" in the 1970s. It is starting to get a bit stiff just like my joints.....

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Tonight I decided to put the new glass in my windshield frames.  You can see in the first photo I taped the glass sealing material onto the windshield and mitered the corners.  I rubbed the rubber and cork material with kerosene and then slipped them in place.   After the glass was in place I trimmed the excess material off.

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