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1933 Franklin Clutch Disc.


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I'm curious it doesn't have a spring loaded centre in it - the parts listing for 45913 shows a sprung centre - it's for Series 13 through the first 1,000 or so cars of Series 16 in 1932.

Did Franklin go away from a sprung centre in the later Series 16 and/or Olympic cars?

 

Roger

 

 

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Usually, unsprung center clutch discs are used for high output heavy-duty applications, and racing, where smooth clutch engagement is not the priority.   Even the V-12 engine uses clutch discs with spring-loaded hubs.

 

That unsprung center disc, and it's segmented friction facings, looks more modern than early 1930 era Franklins.  

 

Paul

 

 

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What is the word above "CP 135" as shown in the second photo - can you make out the whole word on the actual clutch disc?

 

Roger

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2 hours ago, Hupp36 said:

So, is it  a Franklin clutch disc or  should I  just  though  it  in the  trash?

Alex, What made you think it was Franklin/ Try it on a known Franklin spline and see if it is correct.  What is the OD measure?  Don't threw it away...

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It's not trash to someone and your price is  very reasonable for what re-faced clutch disc go for. Just to put new facings on it would be at least $50.00 or more today. Thanks to Covid screwing up the manufactures my clutch friction facing whole sale prices recently went up. I suggest advertise it in the general parts for sale section along with the measurements. Someone may recognize it by sizes and buy it.

 

Or place it in the, "What Is It" forum with the measurements. A lot of guys have the old parts books and might be able to look up by size or that CP 135 number.  

 

Paul

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I've seen several similar clutch disc's on tractors. Do like Paul says and put it on "What is it" forum or advertise it on eBay as "vintage clutch disc" with all its dimensions. Don't throw it away, it may be someones absolute need!

 

Bill

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Ok,  I  found the  books  my  friend  gave  me  after  he  sold  his  Franklin. There is  a parts  book  and  2 operations  manual. The  parts  book and  operation  manual  describe  the  clutch  with  friction disc  and  no  springs. I  feel  sure this  is  an extra clutch  disc he  had  new  facings  put on.With  these  books  I  would  say  it  fits  a  series  11 or  12 Airman Model. See pics

DSC04157.JPG

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1 hour ago, Hupp36 said:

Gee, this is  a scan put  of the  Airman Series  12.If  you  can  read  what it  says  about  the  clutch, you  will  see it  has  friction  disc.

DSC04158.JPG

A bit of clarity for clutch terms. The "friction discs" are the outer rings originally made of asbestos. When you let up the clutch pedal the friction rings (friction facings in the clutch industry)  are the part that gets clamped between the pressure plate and flywheel to transfer engine power to the transmission.  They have nothing to do with the hub design. 

 

Early clutches used solid mounted discs except the dry clutch of Series 9. It had 2 floating friction discs sandwiching  a cast iron disc on the transmission input shaft. In 1922 Franklin started riveting the friction discs to the cast iron and it was a very "grabby clutch". That's why they went to flexible rubberized cloth discs to attach the hub to the outer plate. It absorbed the shocks common with the solid disc type and gave a smoother  clutch engagement like the later design sprung hubs. 

 

The center flexible discs (2) that connect the hub to the outer plate were 7 rubberized layers of linen and used from series late 10A up to Series 130. I have some experience with this because I'm the guy who makes the flexible discs for clutches and cooling fans  and installs them. I've rebuilt a few hundred of them in the past 40 years. 

 

Starting with the 135/137 Franklin went to a larger diameter clutch disc and used an all metal spring loaded hub, that by the late 20's was becoming the standard design for automotive use, right up to the present. 

 

Paul 

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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