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1954 Lincoln Capri Sedan - $3,500 - Sugar Hill, GA - Project - Not Mine


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1954 Lincoln Capri Sedan - $3,500 - Sugar Hill, GA - Project

https://atlanta.craigslist.org/nat/cto/d/buford-1954-lincoln-capri-sedan/7177536908.html

1954 Lincoln Capri 4-door Sedan. 317 OHV V8. Original with low miles. Been sitting for a few years but was running and driving before parked. Needs to be back on the road. Serious inquires only can

Contact:  Call 770-nine-six-three-six-four-five-four

Copy and paste in your email:  ffe8885c26ce30b9ad6754b6e2fb69f0@sale.craigslist.org

 

I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1954 Lincoln Capri Sedan - Project

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Hmmmm?

I can't put my finger on the reasoning behind it, but I really like this car. 

58L-Y8, most of the cars you post are a delight to see, with many priced very well. I suppose I should consider myself lucky I'm 2-3,000 miles away from most of the cars you post or I'd quickly become one of those guys with a yard full of cars!

I think a good day's polishing and a new set of tires would easily make this former queen of the highway a real head turner again.

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GregLaR

 

You should avail yourself of one like this 1954 Lincoln if you can determine its basically good to start and simply plan on the shipping costs as part of the deal to get a car you really like for a good price.  Other than being dirty, the body shows very little deterioration and the original interior is very good.  Certainly, you would have to have the functional systems reactivated but that's true of a majority of what is for sale unless it is currently licensed, driven and maintained. 

 

I look for CL cars that are infrequently seen and seem to be a good value, i.e. priced below $10K.  Too many folks think they can't have an older car they can drive and enjoy with their family without spending the family fortune on it.   I don't know about in your area of the country, but too many car shows and cruise nights here in Western New York display only a very narrow range of popular muscle cars, overwrought street rods and dolled-up new(er) trucks  that taken altogether are frankly pretty boring.   The only car I have is a 1953 Packard Clipper Deluxe sedan, presentable enough, driver condition.  Its a kick to watch the show attendees circle the car so they can read the make and model name on the rear doors, hear them say "...never seen a Packard Clipper before".

 

Steve

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Great to see a "Mexican" Lincoln that is getting another chance. To bad I don't have any space for it. Hope it finds a good home. I wonder if it has a Hydramatic transmission? The Hydramatic plant fire caused Ford to use a different transmission on these cars part way through the model year.

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird Colonial White

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Lincoln, experts: Was the Lincoln engine of that year (317 c.i., according to the ad) a Y-Block? I ask because my '54 Ford 239 Y-Block has the same two studs and fasteners through each valve cover. I seem to remember something about the difference between Lincoln and Ford/Mercs in '54, but I can't remember what it was. Did Lincoln (like Ford/Merc) first introduce the overhead valve v8 in 1954, or was it earlier than that? Thanks.

 

Looks like a cool Lincoln with some promise. I'm also fortunate I don't live closer to some of these cars. My wife would be very unhappy. 😉

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The Lincoln was first with an OHV engine in 1952. It was the 317, but had a 2 barrel carb and was rated at 160 HP. The engine had many of the same design characteristics as the Y-Block, but was not the same engine and was not marketed as such. For example the Y-Block has mechanical valve lifters, the 317 had hydraulic. The largest displacement of the Y-Block was 312 CID while the Lincoln engine topped out at 430 CID (I believe).

 

1954 was the first year for the Y-Blocks in Fords and Mercurys. The Ford was a 239 as you mentioned and the Mercury was a 256 that sported a four barrel carburetor. From then on the displacements were 272, 292, and 312. Basically all major development on the Y-Block ceased with the 1957 version and emphasis was placed on the FE big block engines for 1958 (332 and later  352, 390, 428 displacements).

Lew Bachman

1957 T-Bird 312 Y-Block

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

GregLaR

 

You should avail yourself of one like this 1954 Lincoln if you can determine its basically good to start and simply plan on the shipping costs as part of the deal to get a car you really like for a good price.  Other than being dirty, the body shows very little deterioration and the original interior is very good.  Certainly, you would have to have the functional systems reactivated but that's true of a majority of what is for sale unless it is currently licensed, driven and maintained. 

 

I look for CL cars that are infrequently seen and seem to be a good value, i.e. priced below $10K.  Too many folks think they can't have an older car they can drive and enjoy with their family without spending the family fortune on it.   I don't know about in your area of the country, but too many car shows and cruise nights here in Western New York display only a very narrow range of popular muscle cars, overwrought street rods and dolled-up new(er) trucks  that taken altogether are frankly pretty boring.   The only car I have is a 1953 Packard Clipper Deluxe sedan, presentable enough, driver condition.  Its a kick to watch the show attendees circle the car so they can read the make and model name on the rear doors, hear them say "...never seen a Packard Clipper before".

 

Steve

 

I agree Steve. I have shipped cars in the past and don't mind doing that at all, except when the cars are non-runners like this one. Seems the transport people want very little to do with them in this condition. If they're within a few hundred miles, I don't mind making the transport trip myself. Always enjoy any excuse to get out on the road. As you said, this car looks good and solid, the interior looks great and reactivating the functional systems is what it's all about. I believe this would be a fun car to do with quick and satisfying results. The give-away price makes it hard to pass up.

 

And yes, car shows here tend to look about the same as what you describe in your area, with the addition of the fast and furious group, in their trash built Honda/Toyota/Kia/Mitsubishi/etc. all with the obligatory, extra loud, cantaloupe launcher protruding from under the rear bumper. 

Poser.jpg.1f8e22681900e204180e8ac1ebb76782.jpg

 

SoCal was once a Mecca for the classic, cool and custom car culture. Somewhere along the way the drugs must have changed....

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5 hours ago, 1957Birdman said:

The Lincoln was first with an OHV engine in 1952. It was the 317, but had a 2 barrel carb and was rated at 160 HP. The engine had many of the same design characteristics as the Y-Block, but was not the same engine and was not marketed as such. For example the Y-Block has mechanical valve lifters, the 317 had hydraulic. The largest displacement of the Y-Block was 312 CID while the Lincoln engine topped out at 430 CID (I believe).

 

1954 was the first year for the Y-Blocks in Fords and Mercurys. The Ford was a 239 as you mentioned and the Mercury was a 256 that sported a four barrel carburetor. From then on the displacements were 272, 292, and 312. Basically all major development on the Y-Block ceased with the 1957 version and emphasis was placed on the FE big block engines for 1958 (332 and later  352, 390, 428 displacements).

Lew Bachman

1957 T-Bird 312 Y-Block

 

Thanks Lew. I knew the Y-Block topped out at 312 displacement from the factory, so I knew the 317 displacement had to be for something else. So was the 317 one of the early "MEL" family of engines, or did MEL refer to something else?

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JamesR

 

The first generation Lincoln OHV V8 was an engine series by itself: 317, 341 and 368 cu in  The engineering architecture influenced the Ford-Mercury Y-Block engine series though wasn't really part of it.  The M-E-L 383-410-430 cu in was unique in that the block deck was angled 10 degree, creating the combustion chambers in the block rather than in the cylinder heads.  The F-E engines were another separate series with their own design and features.  Each seemed to be FoMoCo trying different approaches to engine design in an effort to discover the best overall features.   The Y-Block design had problems with upper end oil distribution.  The F-E series had problems with returning oil to the crankcase and ventilation, would sludge up terribly.

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The problem with oiling of the Y-Block was mostly due to the ash content of the oil available then, contributing to the problems with sludge and clogged up overhead oiling. With the modern oils there don't appear to be any problems as long as the service schedule is maintained. I have never had an such problem with my car in 25 years.

Thanks to 58L-Y8 for clarifying the various engine series that Ford used for the M-E-L series of engines. I am most familiar with the Y-Block series, FE series, and small block.

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird

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