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Autolite 1100 rebuild


metalmoto
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Hi again,

 

Trying to get my 65 Ford Falcon Futura running again.

Garaged for 35 years, and Thanks to everyone, I've finally spark.

 

First off, trying to get her running on a tight budget. And like to keep it as original as possible.

 

OK, this is what I have, and figured out so far, with the help of the net.

 

Original carburetor on the car, at least I assume it is.

No ID tag,  Stamp near throttle shows a "0". I measured the venturi with a caliper, measures 1 inch exactly.

The car has a 170 ci engine. Seems like it's a carb from a 144 ci engine. But it was running fine, before it was parked, 35 years ago.

 

It's disassembled, and I got it pretty clean using Simple Green and a ultrasonic cleaner.

Only problem is the throttle shaft is seized. I tried soaking it for a few days in PB blaster, but it barely moves.

 

Secondly, I found an identical carburetor in the trunk. The throttle shaft moves freely, but has some side to side slop.

This carb is a little beat up on the upper half. And don't think it's going to be any good.

Although the bottom part is fine, and in better condition.

 

However, stamp near throttle linkage is stamped 2, 2. One number is faint, so it looks like it was stamped twice, to identify it. 

Indeed, the venturi measures 1.2 inches, So it must be for a 200 ci engine. 

 

Not sure if using this larger venturi on my 170 ci engine will work?

 

As I was thinking of using the top half of the original carb, with the better bottom half, where the throttle shaft is not seized.

But since the venturi size is different, it probably will give me problems.

 

It appears, the venturi can be removed, and perhaps swapped with the smaller one. But it's seems risky, as the phenolic material is probably brittle, and I'm afraid to take the chance, of damaging it.

 

My only other option, at this point, is to disassemble the throttle shaft, and try to break it loose. 

This also seems risky. Don't want to break the delicate pot metal, it appears to be made out of.

 

This where I'm at right now.

 

Other than spending $$$ on another rebuilt carb, what do you think I should do?

 

The car structure is sound, still completely original, electrical all works, needs some bodywork.

Basically want to get it running first, before moving onto brakes etc.

Engine is very good, rebuilt about 1,000 miles before being parked.

Believe me, I checked it out good, or I wouldn't be this far into it.

 

I know the history of it,  it's been in my family since 1978. 

 

I would greatly appreciate any suggestions, on rebuilding the carburetor.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Dave

 

 

 

 

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The carbs are identical, from what I have learned. Except perhaps the casting molds.

The venturi is made of a phenolic resin, that was inserted for the particular engine, it was made for.

 

I'd like to keep it original, but the throttle shaft wont budge. 

I'm going to attempt to remove the expansion pin, and see if if I can get it move.

Just was trying to avoid doing that. Maybe if real gentle, I wont damage the casing.

 

Perhaps a little heat from a propane torch will loosen it. I will try that first.

 

I haven't given up on it yet. 

 

My last resort will be buying a Chinese copy of the carb for $150. Just to get it running.

Then I can get the original rebuilt later. Kind of stuck at this point😫

 

I will keep you informed of my progress.

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Larger venturi is no big. Probably has larger jets also to accommodate a smaller signal at a particular flow rate. John knows best but I used to swap around Rochester 2G and 2GCs a lot. With the right massaging can get up to 450 cfm out of a large one. (Rules said "one Rochester 2GC").

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To free frozen throttle shafts I use heat to pull WD40 into the carb body & let that soak in, it probably won't free it at that point.  Then I use the heat again to melt wax into the body around the shafts and after that you start to see movement, it'll be gradual so don't force it.  

Its a time consuming process but it'll save a valuable carb.  Bees wax works best if you can find it, I just used a few birthday candles on a set of old carters.

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4 hours ago, metalmoto said:

Perhaps a little heat from a propane torch will loosen it. I will try that first.

A heat gun would be better. Things can get out of hand pretty quickly (too hot) with a torch. 

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TAKE THE ONE OFF THE CAR AND  TAKE IT APART AS MUCH AS YOU CAN. THEN GET SOME  REAL LEMON JUICE  AND  GET A PAN TO PUT IT IN AND PUT WATER ENOUGH TO COVER IT AND ADD SOME LEMON JUICE  THEN TURN THE HEAT ON WHEN IT JUST HAS SOME LITTLE BUBBLES  ITS HOT ENOUGH LEAVE IT GO FOR SEVERAL HOURS . BEST DONE OUT SIDE. THEN YOU WILL BE TO TAKE THE REST OF THE CARB APART.

IF THE SCREWS  DON’T COME OUT EASY  COOK IT SOME MORE.

 I USE A OLD CROCK POT THAT HAS  SOME  HEAT CONTROL.

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5 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Good news is that if a throttle shaft is stuck then it probably is also not worn out.  As if anyone locally in whatever car club may be able to help you rebuild it yourself (usually they just need all unstuck and new gaskets - not a complete rebuild). 

 

John, I was thinking that also. 

The "spare" carb, with the larger venturi has some side to side movement in the throttle shaft. Is that bad?

 

I already have both carbs disassembled, and have a rebuild kit.

 

I'll keep soaking it, and hopefully it will start moving.

 

Thanks

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1 hour ago, metalmoto said:

 

John, I was thinking that also. 

The "spare" carb, with the larger venturi has some side to side movement in the throttle shaft. Is that bad?

 

I already have both carbs disassembled, and have a rebuild kit.

 

I'll keep soaking it, and hopefully it will start moving.

 

Thanks

IF PENETRATING OIL DOES NOT WORK, THEN TRY EVAPO-RUST

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  • 11 months later...

Hello All,

 

It's been a long time. Between Covid and everything else...

Soaked the carb for months, and it's still seized!

 

My next option is using the top half of a spare carb, and the bottom half of the original carb.

Maybe I'll get lucky, and it will run good.

 

I will get back, when I get it back together and installed.

 

Dave

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Then a few ice cubes and you will have lemonade.

I have had this same problem. I think you mentioned that it would move a little.

I suspect that if you keep at it with the proper lube you will have good luck.

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You've been messing with this thing for nearly a year. Surely you don't have the only two 1100s in existence?

 

With hundreds of thousands of them made it's time to forget salvaging the carb that the car supposedly was born with and find a usable core to rebuild. Shouldn't be at all difficult to find a correctly coded number and application. Use vintage Ford and Autolite parts catalogs to your advantage.

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It's not like I haven't been trying to find a good rebuild-able carb. People are asking way too much for one, in unseen/unknown condition.

Others want to rebuild mine for an outrageous amount of money. I'm no fool. 

Yes, I put off working on the car for a while. I had to buy another car for me to drive to work, and gave my car to my wife to drive.

I need to keep the daily drivers going, as they are more important than my Falcon, right now...

And it's not like anyone here, can help me out, and offer to sell me a old carb for a reasonable price...

 

  

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8 hours ago, metalmoto said:

It's not like I haven't been trying to find a good rebuild-able carb. People are asking way too much for one, in unseen/unknown condition.

Others want to rebuild mine for an outrageous amount of money. I'm no fool. 

Yes, I put off working on the car for a while. I had to buy another car for me to drive to work, and gave my car to my wife to drive.

I need to keep the daily drivers going, as they are more important than my Falcon, right now...

And it's not like anyone here, can help me out, and offer to sell me a old carb for a reasonable price...

 

  

 

OK - first of all, I am sold out of the 144/170 carbs, so this is advice only, not an attempt to make a sale.

 

40 or so years ago, there was a push on demand for the 144/170 carbs to restore the small Rancheros. Add a zero to the price.

30 or so years ago, there was another push on demand for the 144/170 carbs to restore the Econoline vans. Add another zero to the price.

 

The 144/170 carbs are scarcer than those for a K series Mustang (289/271 HP), and priced accordingly. You might be able to swap a complete running 200 CID ENGINE for less than a 144/170 carb!

 

So not sure what your idea of reasonable would be; but take the above into account if someone offers you a genuine 144/170 carb.

 

Again, I am sold out, and have been for 20 years!

 

Jon.

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Glenn - unless it was stored in the bottom of a pond for 50 years, heat normally works; soaking very seldom works.

 

A carburetor is a good example of a Galvanic cell (a.k.a. battery). Two dis-similar metals in the presence of a liquid. There is ion flow, creating corrosion between the shaft and the carb body. Heat to maybe 100 degrees less than the melting point of the body will burn the oxygen out of the corrosion molecules, thus reducing the space they occupy. Then penetrating oil will sometimes work.

 

Bloo - while the original Autolite's are scarcer than a 6-fingered poker dealer, Holley made service replacements almost as soon as the Autolites hit the street. My guess would be that any FLAPS could easily obtain a rebuilt Holley. And probably one could be ordered through a Ford dealer. And since the Holley would not have been original, there would be no premium in price.

 

Jon

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Sounds like the OP could determine melting point of the carb casting and then stuff it in an oven for a while. Daresay a good-sized thrift store toaster oven could do the job?

 

This is why I love these Forums. Someone, somewhere, has often figured out a way!

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