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1937 Cord Custom Beverly - $50,000 - Conneaut Lake, PA - Not Mine


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1937 Cord Custom Beverly - $50,000 - Conneaut Lake, PA

https://erie.craigslist.org/cto/d/conneaut-lake-1937-cord-custom-beverly/7176121738.html

Classic CORD, professionally restored. V8 Lycoming engine (perfect)front wheel drive, body and paint excellent,

Contact:  Dick  (814) 3-3-six-8-four-7-zero

Copy and paste in your email:  37875387379833dead6e66b0c5e28171@sale.craigslist.org

 

I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1937 Cord Custom Beverly.

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2 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Those more export can chime in on the details but it seems $10k to $15k light in terms of price.  Looks great in black.


I thought that same thing, but you never know how quickly the seller wants it sold. On the other side, it could also be another CL scam... 

 

I certainly would drive to see if it was real and look the paperwork over carefully before wiring cash...

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19 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Seems cheap to me, too, but that vinyl interior is the reason.

Maybe it is Leather - Leather was available/optional in the closed cars and I am not sure, but probably a Leather car has vinyl piping/minor trim (and in open Cords and Auburns it was originally a combination of Leather and Vinyl - which is good as they tend to take in water in rain and nice the door panels dry out). 

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20 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Those more export can chime in on the details but it seems $10k to $15k light in terms of price.  Looks great in black.

You may  have been looking at another post or they corrected/amended  - looks to be 50K (which is probably just about right for a "driver" quality car that most likely needs sorted - not many of these cars really run the way that they should)

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From an ACD Club Member perspective - THIS CAR IS WORTH A LOOK !!! 

 

I suspect the interior is leather (not sure if you could get a cloth headliner with a leather interior though), the trunk is actually authentically restored with what looks to be reproduction lining on the lid and sides, it's fine under hood excepting lacks insulation on exhaust pipes matched to the heater hoses being too "red" plus a little overchroming on the horns and ignition wiring in black would be a better choice , a complete car - plus such as rare factory fog lamps with correct brackets, correct tires, hard to do one of these in black,  and ...  - my guess is a bit underpriced too, but equally priced to sell verses sit on the market for 6 months. 

 

Here is another https://hymanltd.com/vehicles/6709-1937-cord-812-beverly-sedan/  - I believe we used this car last year at ACD Festival for Judging Practice - preferably should have a black ignition wiring (original was said to be maroon to match the distributor cap), has some miscellaneous hardware nuts/bolts that is not correct (but are fine substitutes), a few age related restoration issues (that I would call incredibly incredibly minor) = basically it is as nice an example as you will ever hope to find. 

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I think the car is a re-stamped 36 model from the engine. 37s had a fuel pump on the side of the engine and the cowl fillers were gone in 37. The car is nice and a driver. I think it is priced fair from the pictures.

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I called the seller and am waiting for him to call me back. So Cords had automatic transmissions in 1937? The ad on Craigslist says automatic so is that a mistake? I didn't think they were perfected until around 1950. Is there anything unique to Cords that I should know? Has anyone here ever owned one? Thanks....

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From Wikipedia:

 

The Model 810/812 are probably the best-known of the company's products. Styled by Gordon M. Buehrig, they featured front-wheel drive and independent front suspension; the front drive enabled the 810 to be so low, running boards were unnecessary. Powered by a 4,739 cc (289 cu in) Lycoming V8 of the same 125 horsepower as the L-29, the 810 had a four-speed electrically-selected semi-automatic transmission, among other innovative features.

 

Semi-automatic transmission? Is that similar to the Chrysler transmission a few years later with the clutch pedal only being used to take off from a stop?

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I see a few faults.......it’s the shortcuts one can’t see in photos that haunt you. Like many cars, it’s a roll of the dice, try your luck. Plan on spending money sorting it.........are the head’s reproduction ......if they are original that’s a big gamble right there. The price isn’t particularly attractive to me, as I have been lurking looking for a 810/812 for a while now. The old rule applies.....nothing is more expensive than a car that was a “good deal”.

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30 minutes ago, gossp said:

I believe you pre-select on a cord and then hit the clutch and wait a half a mile for the shift to take place. 

 

That might be a little problematic especially if going uphill.... :o

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32 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I see a few faults.......it’s the shortcuts one can’t see in photos that haunt you. Like many cars, it’s a roll of the dice, try your luck. Plan on spending money sorting it.........are the head’s reproduction ......if they are original that’s a big gamble right there. The price isn’t particularly attractive to me, as I have been lurking looking for a 810/812 for a while now. The old rule applies.....nothing is more expensive than a car that was a “good deal”.

 

Since I'm not much of a mechanic I guess I should probably pass on it. Thanks for the info....

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34 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I see a few faults.......it’s the shortcuts one can’t see in photos that haunt you. Like many cars, it’s a roll of the dice, try your luck. Plan on spending money sorting it.........are the head’s reproduction ......if they are original that’s a big gamble right there. The price isn’t particularly attractive to me, as I have been lurking looking for a 810/812 for a while now. The old rule applies.....nothing is more expensive than a car that was a “good deal”.

The heads are JK Howell reproductions,.

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16 minutes ago, Lebowski said:

 

Since I'm not much of a mechanic I guess I should probably pass on it. Thanks for the info....


I wouldn’t take my advice on a car from just a few photos, every car should be investigated to improve your learning curve, and establish where the market is. It is important to develop a critical eye, and understand that when one sees a handful of things that are problems or need attention, it will probably apply to many other items and parts of the car. Fact is it’s almost impossible to buy a car that needs nothing, and it’s almost impossible to buy a car that is perfect....regardless of price. If you look at ten or twenty cars before you buy, you will develop the skill necessary to buy a good car........price should not be in the top three things you are considering. There is nothing more expensive than a cheap car. Take your time and hunt them hard.....the right car at the right price will come along.......but it’s hard work.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Dad asks 3 questions when someone asks about Cords:  

 

1. Are you an Engineer  ?  If answer is no then we go to question # 2.  

2. Are you handy ? If the answer is no then we go to question # 3.

3. Do you have a lot of disposable income ?  If the answer is no then his reply is below.

Reply:  "Then you should not get a Cord as it will never be the car you want it to be or expect it to be for you." 

 

Basically, there are a few things Pre-WWII that are not for the novice (they can try one, but they have to be willing to invest the time and the money, plus they probably will not master it if they are anti-social (aka there is a lot of good advice out there, but you have to be able to talk to people and a really tough long uphill road of wheel reinvention ahead when they cannot):  Things known for very expensive engineering issues or just were very expensive when new, Rolls Royce's/Bentley's (plus about all other large horsepower European Pre-WWII things), 1929-1931 Cadillac's, and any Cord.  

 

Sidenote: Now, the flip side of the coin is that the stuff I just mentioned is incredibly "cool", so worthwhile to apply yourself toward it - just do not walk in blindly.  

 

Add'l Sidenote:  I know a lot of  "planners" who tend to never end up with the cool stuff as they talk themselves out of it - there is a place in the World for impulse buys (aka if you see something you may like then just reach out for it).  

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15 hours ago, edinmass said:

 If you look at ten or twenty cars before you buy, you will develop the skill necessary to buy a good car........price should not be in the top three things you are considering. There is nothing more expensive than a cheap car. Take your time and hunt them hard.....the right car at the right price will come along.......but it’s hard work.

Interestingly, if there are two X's sitting next to each other and one is a 1960's to 1980's restoration at 20K and the other done yesterday and looking fantastic for 18K, I know a lot of people who will buy the 18K car just because it is nice and cheaper and for that matter not even look at the older restored car.  It is a complicated formula, but you want basically such as "which has the better mechanical restoration, which was the better condition car prior to restoration, which needs what in the future, and ...".  This all boils down to homework, having a feel for it, having made a few good purchases, having made a few bad purchases, and ... - and no matter how prepared there is still the "oh s - - t that happens (like the 50K engine rebuild develops a knock and the whole thing has to come apart or ...).  And, my best advice is still - if you like it then jump into the pot and if you think you are truly over your head then best to be prepared to jump back out of the pot. 

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The 88 year old owner of the Cord just called and we had a nice chat for 25 minutes. He bought it 18 years ago from a guy in Colorado and the engine was not in good shape like the seller said it was so he sent it to a place in Cleveland 75 miles away and spent $20k on a complete rebuild. He also had the trans rebuilt by a guy in the Cord Club in Auburn, IN. He only drives it about 50 miles a year. The radio and wipers don't work but he thinks everything else does. He's firm on the $50k price. A guy from NC drove up there and is interested he said but hasn't made a commitment to buy it yet. The radials on it were there when he bought it so I would put tires on it unless you never go over 30 mph like he does. That's about all I can remember from our conversation for now....

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Cord 810/812 are actually great drivers when sorted.  The pre-selector works fine - again, when sorted.  There is also tremendous support from the club and good parts availability.

 

Those reproduction heads are a good thing as they supposedly have improved water passages.

 

 

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Wish I was a mechanic with knowledge of the Auburn's pick for manufacture of its engine.   Sadly since I am not and I have little time to educate myself as to how to repair these engines and  any other mechanical parts I will have to pass on this vehicle.  However, the asking price of this car with the super rare correct fog light attachments is a very fair price even if the upholstery may not be leather. The cost to restore a 1937 CORD is high. Old rusty parts that need attention cost so much as to scare the average buyer. 

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1 hour ago, Lebowski said:

The radials on it were there when he bought it so I would put tires on it unless you never go over 30 mph like he does. 

It appears to have  Goodyear bias ply tires on it with the concentrically ridged whitewall - nice tires as far as ride/drive, but after 20 + years probably a new set is all or the best.  I usually get them here:  https://www.kelseytire.com/antique/military-series/650-16-deluxe-all-weather-4-0-ww/

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1 hour ago, BucketofBolts said:

 the upholstery may not be leather. 

 

I specifically asked him if it was leather or vinyl and he said leather. He also said that the tires are radials but I see that John (above) thinks they may be bias ply so who knows. Like I said he's 88 years old. If I call him back I'm going to ask him if he has receipts for the engine and trans rebuilds. He said he paid $56k for the car in 2002. He also said he took it to a classic car repair shop in his area and they totally ripped him off as far as going way over the quoted price for the work they did. He may have over $100k in the car so I can understand why he's saying that he's firm on the $50k selling price....

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3 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Interestingly, if there are two X's sitting next to each other and one is a 1960's to 1980's restoration at 20K and the other done yesterday and looking fantastic for 18K, I know a lot of people who will buy the 18K car just because it is nice and cheaper and for that matter not even look at the older restored car.  It is a complicated formula, but you want basically such as "which has the better mechanical restoration, which was the better condition car prior to restoration, which needs what in the future, and ...".  This all boils down to homework, having a feel for it, having made a few good purchases, having made a few bad purchases, and ... - and no matter how prepared there is still the "oh s - - t that happens (like the 50K engine rebuild develops a knock and the whole thing has to come apart or ...).  And, my best advice is still - if you like it then jump into the pot and if you think you are truly over your head then best to be prepared to jump back out of the pot. 

 

Nobody does that anymore. The hobby is full of bargain-hunters and cheapskates for whom quality is an abstraction at best. They just buy the cheap one. 10 times out of 10. Guaranteed.

 

Almost every single phone call I get isn't, "How nice is it?" but rather "What's the least you'll take?" Many guys start haggling and working the price before they even ask if a car is still available.

 

People won't pay more for quality. They won't do it at Wal-Mart and they won't do it when buying an old car unless it's something very unique. But if it's a commodity car like a Model A or a Camaro or even this Cord, they are most interested in the cheapest one. After that, if the cheapest one sells before they can work over the seller for a deal, they lose interest in owning that car completely.


Cheap. It's all that matters anymore.

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33 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Nobody does that anymore. The hobby is full of bargain-hunters and cheapskates for whom quality is an abstraction at best. They just buy the cheap one. 10 times out of 10. Guaranteed.

 

Almost every single phone call I get isn't, "How nice is it?" but rather "What's the least you'll take?" Many guys start haggling and working the price before they even ask if a car is still available.

 

People won't pay more for quality. They won't do it at Wal-Mart and they won't do it when buying an old car unless it's something very unique. But if it's a commodity car like a Model A or a Camaro or even this Cord, they are most interested in the cheapest one. After that, if the cheapest one sells before they can work over the seller for a deal, they lose interest in owning that car completely.


Cheap. It's all that matters anymore.

 

I think you are very correct about the commodity cars.  You see lots and lots of watchers on the ebay auctions for the cheapest of some variety of car.   GTO,  T-Bird,  Camaro, etc.   

 

You are so much better off over paying for the best car, especially the one where the seller has 3x what is worth in to it.

 

 

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45 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Nobody does that anymore. The hobby is full of bargain-hunters and cheapskates for whom quality is an abstraction at best. They just buy the cheap one. 10 times out of 10. Guaranteed.

 

Almost every single phone call I get isn't, "How nice is it?" but rather "What's the least you'll take?" Many guys start haggling and working the price before they even ask if a car is still available.

 

People won't pay more for quality. They won't do it at Wal-Mart and they won't do it when buying an old car unless it's something very unique. But if it's a commodity car like a Model A or a Camaro or even this Cord, they are most interested in the cheapest one. After that, if the cheapest one sells before they can work over the seller for a deal, they lose interest in owning that car completely.


Cheap. It's all that matters anymore.

Sadly, for the most part I agree with you (there are the exceptions, but what you say tends to probably be 80% of what I see and at times perhaps more than 80%). 

 

Dad always was preaching about "what was the condition of it before the restoration" matched to who did what and was that a good choice in restoration and I learned to take the low mileage stuff that should never have been restored no matter what the color and ... - try to make the best of it thereafter.  I think the difference is the focus was always on touring and getting a good car for touring purposes.  You tour AACA and CCCA and my guess is you heard the same lectures - those who do not tour probably do not learn such 

 

I was asked Ed Minnie, to keep an eye out for a certain 1931 Pierce Arrow Club Sedan - the car was done 100% amateur and on a shoe string budget, but was done by die hard AACA touring couple and as the car fell flat on its face tour after tour they kept on it and eventually turned it into a pretty reliable car (and I saw it prior to restoration and it had certainly been nothing to write home about (it was a moth hotel, painted with a brush, and ... - looked like s - - t, but upon a little closer look was perhaps NOT a diamond in the rough, but was solid as a rock).  

 

Anyway, point of story is people will gravitate toward the shiner car and also to the cheaper car verses the really "good" car. 

 

 

 

 

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On 8/18/2020 at 12:22 PM, edinmass said:

It sounds like its a good car.........just the price is the question........

If the owner had taken better photos, written a better description, and put 68K in his price it probably would have been sold by now.

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28 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

If the owner had taken better photos, written a better description, and put 68K in his price it probably would have been sold by now.

 

It always amazes me how people who theoretically want to sell something fairly expensive put zero effort in to the process.   I'm thinking with elderly owners they just don't have the technology to do it?

 

How hard is it to put a really detailed description together?    The ads you see from dealers are usually just as bad as the individual one time sellers.   How he hell do these guys stay in business?

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6 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

It always amazes me how people who theoretically want to sell something fairly expensive put zero effort in to the process.   I'm thinking with elderly owners they just don't have the technology to do it?

 

How hard is it to put a really detailed description together?    The ads you see from dealers are usually just as bad as the individual one time sellers.   How he hell do these guys stay in business?

 

The answer is that they don't have to create more detailed descriptions--nobody reads them anyway. I write at least 1000 words about most cars and not the standard "Packard was founded by the Packard Brothers in 1899... blah blah blah" but actual details about the actual car. Photos don't seem to matter, either. We include 80-125 hi-res, clear, well-lit photos but according to the tracking software on our website, almost nobody looks beyond the first three or four.

 

You know how every phone call begins after I do all that? "Hey, what can you tell me about this car you have?" followed by "Do you have any other pictures you can text me?"

 

Nobody reads anything anymore. Nobody cares. Nobody pays attention or does their own homework. Nobody's patient or careful or thoughtful. It's all short-attention-span theater. They're just going to call and ask the seller to walk them through it personally so they can interrupt and get right to haggling about the price.

 

Sometimes I wonder why I even bother--it's purely my OCD and wanting to have a complete, neat, tidy, effective presentation so all the cars match, as if I'm building some kind of archive. I could easily do much less and probably sell just as many cars for just as much money. Nevertheless, I just can't quite force myself to be bad at my job.

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On 8/18/2020 at 3:27 PM, Matt Harwood said:

Cheap. It's all that matters anymore.

 

That's true for most people Matt - there are a few of us who look for quality. On my Packard, I paid a little more than I thought I could afford, because it appeared to be a mostly original, honest car. Turns out, the "rebuilt" engine was repainted, but shame on me for believing the guy with no receipts.

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Anybody wanting a Cord should go and look in person. They should go for a long ride in the car. More than just around the block. If the seller doesn't want you driving until you pay for the car that should be expected. An inexperienced throttle jockey can destroy a transmission in seconds. But if the car is good a 20-30 mile trip should be no issue. I have put thousands of miles on my Cord. I maintain it and service it. They are wonderful machines. Anybody who tells you they have problems or were bad from the factory has never owned or driven a good one. 

 

 

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