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Keeping the gravel roads smooth....


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.. for your old autos. Rescued a 1947 Austin-Western 99M Road Grader from the scrap man last week. I have it back here in the yard and it is ready to keep the dirt roads in good shape for the old cars around here. It is powered by an Allis Chalmers/ Buda K428 gas engine. Drove it 8 miles to get it here and it runs like a clock.  

IMG_2796.JPG

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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That presumably aftermarket cab appears to be well constructed and is a very nice fit!  It should keep one warm in the winter while removing snow off the road with it.

 

Craig

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Check out the The Historical Construction Equipment Association (hcea.net).

 

I commend you for extending a life-line to an old work horse, well done !!

 

As a retired member of a global construction machinery manufacturer, I can say with some credibility that a grader operator is usually the senior and most skilled machine operator in a fully equipped construction machinery yard.  It takes skill and experience plus operating more controls than one has hands to operate them with.

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4 minutes ago, Uncle_Buck said:

Check out the The Historical Construction Equipment Association (hcea.net).

 

I commend you for extending a life-line to an old work horse, well done !!

 

As a retired member of a global construction machinery manufacturer, I can say with some credibility that a grader operator is usually the senior and most skilled machine operator in a fully equipped construction machinery yard.  It takes skill and experience plus operating more controls than one has hands to operate them with.

I've been a member of HCEA for years Uncle Buck. True words about a grader operator. A road needs a crown. Most common folks just view the road as flat.... 

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26 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

That presumably aftermarket cab appears to be well constructed and is a very nice fit!  It should keep one warm in the winter while removing snow off the road with it.

 

Craig

This is the second cab I've seen like this and it is a factory option. It has a heater and also came with a snow plow that I have to go pick up. 

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1 minute ago, Billy Kingsley said:

That is awesome! Any plans for showing it somewhere?

Not at the moment as everything is shut down. You can stop by if you want and take a gander at it Billy. It lives at Wards Auto Collision Center just outside of the City of Hudson, NY. Dandy Dave! 

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15 minutes ago, Billy Kingsley said:

That is awesome! Any plans for showing it somewhere?

There is an active chapter of the Roadbuilders & Heavy Construction Heritage Society of Canada in Alberta that has regular shows and demonstrations of the vintage equipment every summer:   https://www.smokstak.com/forum/threads/roadbuilders-and-heavy-construction-heritage-society-of-canada.77578/

 

Craig

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3 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

There is an active chapter of the Roadbuilders & Heavy Construction Heritage Society of Canada in Alberta that has regular shows and demonstrations of the vintage equipment every summer:   https://www.smokstak.com/forum/threads/roadbuilders-and-heavy-construction-heritage-society-of-canada.77578/

 

Craig

 

That would be a VERY LONG DRIVE from Hudson, New York with this road grader-

 

Kudos to Dandy Dave for preserving and maintaining so many varied types of heavy equipment.

 

Dave, It has been too long since we had dinner in Geneva - hope you got to use the tires

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32 minutes ago, Dandy Dave said:

I've been a member of HCEA for years Uncle Buck. True words about a grader operator. A road needs a crown. Most common folks just view the road as flat.... 

Good job saving another piece of equipment!  I see you are a fellow HCEA member- have you been to any of their shows? Lotsa big  old equipment randomly (or so it seems) running around digging, hauling, pushing and trenching the dirt. The  crowd varies from  young toddlers who can barely walk and wear diapers to old  retired operators who can barely walk and wear.... hey, wait a minute.....

 

Where was I? Oh, yeah  with all of its mechanical mayhem (and if you love the smell of  stale diesel and fresh dirt)  its a great way to spend a weekend! I'm surprised OSHA doesnt shut them down.....

 

Here's my Allis "D" maintaining our mile long dirt road last winter. I usually get the road cleared a day or two before the road commission grader finally shows up.

IM009505.JPG

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4 hours ago, Uncle_Buck said:

I can say with some credibility that a grader operator is usually the senior and most skilled machine operator in a fully equipped construction machinery yard.  It takes skill and experience plus operating more controls than one has hands to operate them with.

A small town in Manitoba where I lived was opening a new development with crescents.  The surveyors were done, everything staked out.  Then the municipal grader arrived and asked why the sewers were at the high spots.  He pulled a couple of stakes up and moved them and then four trips around the crescent and the road was graded with the low spots for the sewers in the right place.  When they did the next crescent the road was graded first and then the surveyors did the lots.  In that area the grader was called a "Maintainer".

Nice to see a "maintainer" saved.

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8 minutes ago, Tinindian said:

A small town in Manitoba where I lived . . .  In that area the grader was called a "Maintainer".

Nice to see a "maintainer" saved.

 

On summer job while in college was on a road construction site. They called a grader a "blade" on that job. I've long wondered if that was a regional thing as I've never heard them called that before or since.

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Dave, I dig it.

 

My dad learned to operate a "motor grader" in 1954 when US58 between Danville and South Boston VA was being four-laned. By all accounts he was good with it, but when VDOT offered him a full time job he turned it down and went back to farming tobacco. I often think my life would have been different had he taken that VDOT job. I sure wouldn't have had to work as hard with no guarantee of a good crop.

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Posted (edited)
20 hours ago, dustycrusty said:

Good job saving another piece of equipment!  I see you are a fellow HCEA member- have you been to any of their shows? Lotsa big  old equipment randomly (or so it seems) running around digging, hauling, pushing and trenching the dirt. The  crowd varies from  young toddlers who can barely walk and wear diapers to old  retired operators who can barely walk and wear.... hey, wait a minute.....

 

Where was I? Oh, yeah  with all of its mechanical mayhem (and if you love the smell of  stale diesel and fresh dirt)  its a great way to spend a weekend! I'm surprised OSHA doesnt shut them down.....

 

Here's my Allis "D" maintaining our mile long dirt road last winter. I usually get the road cleared a day or two before the road commission grader finally shows up.

IM009505.JPG

Love these old AC Model D's. I repaired and ran an AC Model DD about 20 years ago that had the low drive option and a loader on the rear to put rocks in and clean up around the grading sight. I also ran a 212 Cat quite a bit 30 years ago. Oh yeah, I have been to some of the HCEA shows with my small shovel. Hopefully will attend more in the future. Dandy Dave!  

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, Tinindian said:

A small town in Manitoba where I lived was opening a new development with crescents.  The surveyors were done, everything staked out.  Then the municipal grader arrived and asked why the sewers were at the high spots.  He pulled a couple of stakes up and moved them and then four trips around the crescent and the road was graded with the low spots for the sewers in the right place.  When they did the next crescent the road was graded first and then the surveyors did the lots.  In that area the grader was called a "Maintainer".

Nice to see a "maintainer" saved.

 

17 hours ago, ply33 said:

 

On summer job while in college was on a road construction site. They called a grader a "blade" on that job. I've long wondered if that was a regional thing as I've never heard them called that before or since.

Caterpillar in the early years Called them Motor Patrols. Even the parts books for my Cat model 12 say, "Number 12 Motor Patrol" on the cover. Huber called theirs a Road Maintainer. Dandy Dave!  

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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On 8/12/2020 at 11:01 PM, Akstraw said:

I don't know what for, but seeing your find makes me want one!

It is a disease that there is no cure for and it is highly contagious. Dandy Dave!

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My Dad drove a "maintainer" for the county during the depression after we lost the farm. He made $21 a month to support a family of eight but at least he HAD a job. Carried a Stephens Crackshot single shot 22 with no sights in the cab so with the rabbits, pheasants, squirrels and other small game we didn't lack for meat. The only one I can recall was a Galion.

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