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Anyone have a picture of their car at dusk with their headlights on here is a 1930's and it looks great showing the sculpturing of the radiator and fenders


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  • 1 month later...

"FIORELLO", named for his primary passenger, Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, and assigned as the Mayor of New York City's personal Parade Car. Our 1937 Buick Roadmaster Phaeton served the city from 1937 through at least the mid-1950s. Now he is available for Glidden, Founders, Chrome Glidden, Heritage, CCCA, and Sentimental Tours, as well as for local club functions, friends' weddings, etc., or just going for ice cream and a Cruise Night in and around New Orleans.

1937 Buick Front night in New Orleans.jpg

1937 Buick Right Front on Esplanade.jpg

1937 Buick 2018-12-17 Front.jpg

1937 Buick 2018-12-18 Rear.jpg

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Spent today cleaning our main garage and moved a big steel bench into this shed, stuffing away among other things my Cars & Parts magazines from 1977 to late 90s.  It was dusk once things got all back together, and my wife snapped these pics as I thought of this thread when it was closing time. 🙂

20200926_190033.jpg

20200926_185842.jpg

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On 9/18/2020 at 11:14 PM, Marty Roth said:

"FIORELLO", named for his primary passenger, Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, and assigned as the Mayor of New York City's personal Parade Car. Our 1937 Buick Roadmaster Phaeton served the city from 1937 through at least the mid-1950s. Now he is available for Glidden, Founders, Chrome Glidden, Heritage, CCCA, and Sentimental Tours, as well as for local club functions, friends' weddings, etc., or just going for ice cream and a Cruise Night in and around New Orleans.

1937 Buick Front night in New Orleans.jpg

1937 Buick Right Front on Esplanade.jpg

1937 Buick 2018-12-17 Front.jpg

1937 Buick 2018-12-18 Rear.jpg

It is amazing how much your car looks like mine, especially from the rear, and also a Full Classic '37.

00E0E_3l3UL8wxIET_0iu0kE_600x450.jpg

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10 minutes ago, ericmac said:

It is amazing how much your car looks like mine, especially from the rear, and also a Full Classic '37.

00E0E_3l3UL8wxIET_0iu0kE_600x450.jpg

 

 Eric, that is a beautiful car, and yes, it surely appears that they share the primary portion of the body, right down to the way that all four door are hinged at the leading edge. I like the look of your car's chromed taillight stanchions, as well as the full wheel covers, and the extra large rear window, which while dramatically different from my narrow, and spplit original, is certainly a nice safety factor, providing  improved rearward vision. My 1941 Cadillac cabriolet has a full-sized modern plastic rear window, installed prior to my 2006 purchase, in place of the original narrow glass window. Maybe some day we can get them together on an AACA, VMCCA, or CCCA tour.

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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10 minutes ago, Marty Roth said:

 

 Eric, that is a beautiful car, and yes, it surely appears that they share the primary portion of the body, right down to the way that all four door are hinged at the leading edge. I like the look of your car's chromed taillight stanchions, as well as the full wheel covers, and the extra large rear window, which while dramatically different from my narrow, and spplit original, is certainly a nice safety factor, providing  improved rearward vision. My 1941 Cadillac cabriolet has a full-sized modern plastic rear window, installed prior to my 2006 purchase, in place of the original narrow glass window. Maybe some day we can get them together on an AACA, VMCCA, or CCCA tour.

I would certainly be up for that. I find it interesting to look for both the similarities and differences.  My car is Fleetwood bodied but I suspect GM is GM and the country was just pulling out of the depression so it was important to keep costs in line. My hunch is they were essentially the same body from the cowl back.

In my humble opinion,  the 37 Buick had the prettiest grill ever put on a car. Yours is magnificent!

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11 hours ago, ericmac said:

I would certainly be up for that. I find it interesting to look for both the similarities and differences.  My car is Fleetwood bodied but I suspect GM is GM and the country was just pulling out of the depression so it was important to keep costs in line. My hunch is they were essentially the same body from the cowl back.

In my humble opinion,  the 37 Buick had the prettiest grill ever put on a car. Yours is magnificent!

Thank you,

 

Now, if we could also get Walt Gosden to tour with us in his 1937 Roadmaster Phaeton (identical to mine), wouldn't that be something?

 

Stay well,

Stay safe,

See You Down The Road

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On 9/29/2020 at 10:47 PM, ericmac said:

I would certainly be up for that. I find it interesting to look for both the similarities and differences.  My car is Fleetwood bodied but I suspect GM is GM and the country was just pulling out of the depression so it was important to keep costs in line. My hunch is they were essentially the same body from the cowl back.

In my humble opinion,  the 37 Buick had the prettiest grill ever put on a car. Yours is magnificent!

If you guys do get to do this I’d like to see a thread on it.

Didn’t Fleetwood still have it’s very own plant in 1937?

I don’t know, a few years later Fleetwood would just be a name on a plaque with some upholstery options and a different body style coming out of the Fisher plant.

On the other hand, many think GM went to great lengths making the 1932 and ‘39 Chevy look like miniature Cadillacs (and I doubt there’s any actual proof of that — just long repeated suggestion).

Very interesting question

Edited by Ben P.
Clarity, typo (see edit history)
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On 9/26/2020 at 8:56 PM, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Spent today cleaning our main garage and moved a big steel bench into this shed, stuffing away among other things my Cars & Parts magazines from 1977 to late 90s.  It was dusk once things got all back together, and my wife snapped these pics as I thought of this thread when it was closing time. 🙂

20200926_190033.jpg

20200926_185842.jpg

 

Church 

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Marty,

Our identical cars are the Packard 733 touring cars, but we do both own Buick Roadmasters as well mine being a 1940!.

Re the Fleetwood bodies and Fisher, bodies in the late 1930s and especially in the early 1940s - the 1940 Buick Roadmaster and 1940 Cadillac model 62 conv sedans shared many body panels, top irons etc. the seat handle to allow the front seat to adjust is the exact same casting number for both cars. Since the front clip ( hood, fenders, grille, headlamps etc )are totally different , it did give each car /make its own distinctive look despite the close relationship. Packard did this as well so far as body panels and fitments in that era . Today all the modern cars ( to me) look the same - a friend in England when I was there over a decade ago told me modern cars "look like a half sucked sweet" the sweet term means a piece of hard candy. And indeed they do.

Walt

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  • 3 weeks later...

In a story on historic car company mergers, Nov 12 2020 issue of Old Cars Weekly has some 1928 Dodge factory ad photos of the cars in low light with head/cowl lights on. Along with very stylish late-20s ladies.

 

Text suggests Chrysler was going for upscale ladies' magazines with these ads. House and Garden and The House Beautiful were mentioned.

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November is the gloomiest month of the year in Seattle, measured scientifically by photometric techniques. However, we are having a very brief almost Summer-like respite. Took advantage to go visiting along slow traffic free back roads. Leaving forever young Margie to continue her eternal peaceful rest, I was presented with this Autumn scene. By the time I continued my drive, PDT to PST conversion got me again. Late, in the darkness, lining up the never more young machine to continue its temporary rest, the cowl lights presented an unusual opportunity I had never noticed before. This is the best I could do under the circumstances, but it gave me an idea for further photographic improvement on the theme.      -     Carl 

 

 

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7C55C6CE-6B7C-4519-AE71-5C4CF0DA7C0B.jpeg

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