LostInTheWoods

ID mystery auto rear end

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I am trying to identify an old auto rear end I found in the woods.  It consists of an intact rear axle assembly, with both hubs (drum brakes), "differential", and one partial wheel.  The partial wheel had 12 wooden spokes.  I put the word differential in quotes because it does not appear to be a true differential, it looks like just a pinion and ring gear.  The assembly also has 2 leaf springs.

There are no clear make or model marks.  On the differential casing, there is stamped "J5112".

I have pictures.

Any help or clues would be appreciated.  This is not very important, I am just curious.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

no clue on make, but it is very early because it has clincher rims and wooden fellows. 

 

I'm sure it is a differential type as one side of the housing looks like it's big enough for the spider gears,

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Posted (edited)

Looks like it might be agricultural........using the wheels to drive a shaft to provide power to something that is horse drawn? Looks much to light to drive a car. Hubs also look pre gas era.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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When were square nuts replaced by hex ?

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Posted (edited)

How about a photo from the front where the driveshaft goes in and some more details of the brakes.  I am wondering about a real early Weston-Mott unit.  What size are the wheels?

Edited by nickelroadster
addition (see edit history)

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Just Google every light weight car made 1908-1910, it isn't a Maxwell AA. Bob 

174272.jpg

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Posibly a early light duty truck ? I think the springs have been swaped end for end during the wagon conversion. The shackles are usually at the rear of the springs.

Greg

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I do not know what it is but it looks to me like someone has removed the centre section and bolted the axle housings together to make a trailer axle.  Could even be a transaxle.  As nickelroadster suggests a photo of the front would be helpful.

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Possible that it is from a Metz or Saxon? It looks familiar and Saxon is tingling my head...

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5 hours ago, Stude17 said:

I do not know what it is but it looks to me like someone has removed the centre section and bolted the axle housings together to make a trailer axle.  Could even be a transaxle.  As nickelroadster suggests a photo of the front would be helpful.

 

Good idea George except it looks like the front of the housing has a spot for the pinion housing to bolt to.. If there was a center section that was missing I would expect both axle housings to be just plain bells.

 Still think it is a early ; 1910 or previous , light duty car or truck rear end.

 

Greg

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Here are 2 more pics.  The cover at the front of the differential is clearly a home-made sheet metal piece, held on with stacked castle nuts.

On top of one of the springs is stamped 'A-6210'.

The wheel hub shows it was originally painted dark green.

The two halves of the differential are held together with a mixture of square and hex bolts and nuts.

 

Thanks for all of the ideas.

IMG_0918.jpeg

IMG_0919.jpeg

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Found that hex started replacing square in the 1800s so not a factor.

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Posted (edited)

I believe this is a Weston Mott unit circa 1910. Possibly from a Buick. The brakes are 10", standard size for midsize cars.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)

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I made some measurements as requested.

 

Track, from outside of one brake drum to the other, is 53.5 in., to the center line of the wheels makes it 56.5 total, plus or minus.

The wheel is 24 in. diameter, and 2.75 in. width.

Brakes;  The diameter of the moving drum that gets squeezed is 12 3/8 in., and the width of the 'brake pad' band is 1 1/4 in.

The 6 lug nuts on the remaining wheel are 1/2 small hex, and the other 3 are large hex.  2 of the large ones are 'domed', and show the original green paint.

 

Let me know what other info you might need.

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Posted (edited)

LostinTheWoods I believe the rear end you have came from a 1912 Model 30 Oakland tourer.  The attached link gives a good view for comparison.

 

https://www.ruotevecchie.org/oakland-model-30-touring-20161101/

 

Here is another link for comparison.  The remains are identified as a 1913 Oakland Model 42.

 

https://www.desertclassics.com/DC9/Oak13touring.html

Edited by Stude17
More information (see edit history)

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I do not think it is the 1913, (or 1912) Oakland.  See attached pics.  The 1913 has 8 leaves in the springs, and mine has 6.  The 1913 has the springs mounted below the axle, and mine are on top, and could never be installed below.  The brake band on the 1913 also seems to be too wide to match the 1 1/4 inch width of mine.  The pics on the referenced sites also seem to always show 8 lug nuts, and my axle has 6.

 

There were also pics of the differential area for both the 1912 and 13 and they do not match mine.  The 'lump' for the spider gears seems larger on mine than is in the pics.

 

Thanks for all of the ideas, you people are great.

 

Lost...

 

 

My axle vs 1913.png

IMG_0928.jpeg

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I'm pretty sure this is a Weston Mott axle circa 1910. I know I said 10" brakes were pretty standard for midsize cars but I misspoke. Actually 12" is standard. The 1911 Buick midsize car has a rear very similar rear to what you have posted. Weston Mott supplied front and rear axles to a lot of car makers during those years. Are we to believe the body pieces were found with the rear?

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The springs being above the axle tube are another clue that this may be early small truck.  Quite a few cars used this method as well in the very early days ,so not 100% indicative of truck.

 

Greg

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The body parts would suggest a later date than 10,11. Up until 1913/14, most car bodies were made out of wood, but around 1915, manufacturers began to use metal skinned wood framed bodies, like the picture depicts. Some detailed pictures of the body parts would help identify the body. At this point, there is no way to know if the body and rear end are of the same car. It also looks like at least part of the frame is there. Pictures of the frame will help as well.

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