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My 1910 Buick 10 needs a new carb to complete the total engine rebuild and get back on the road. Is there a recommended replacement for the brass Schebler Model D, as I can't seem to prevent flooding on start up, even with a new synthetic float. Any help would be much appreciated. 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

As a general rule, the Schebler model D is the most reliable of all of the Scheblers.

 

Try removing the bowl, and lapping the fuel valve seat with some valve lapping compound. Be sure to wash the residue thoroughly. It should work.

 

If this is not satisfactory to you, we need to play "20 questions" to answer your request.

 

By the way, very pretty car!

 

Jon.

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Posted (edited)

I am currently using Zenith Model A Ford carbs on my 165 cu in Buicks with good success.  They are simple and reliable, but require some creative modification for throttle control via the sector lever.  I recommend trying Carb King's suggestion before making any change.

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)
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On my model 10,  I had a very difficult time adjusting the fuel "needle". I would go from lean to ritch with just a slight turn. I sharpened the point of he valve (in a lathe). That made a world of difference. I was able to dial it in easily and the car ran great

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On 8/1/2020 at 7:06 PM, Worldwide said:

My 1910 Buick 10 needs a new carb to complete the total engine rebuild and get back on the road. Is there a recommended replacement for the brass Schebler Model D, as I can't seem to prevent flooding on start up, even with a new synthetic float. Any help would be much appreciated. 

IMG-0009.JPG

 

Yeah, that is a really cute buggy you have there! The contrasting colors of the white tires & wheels against the "Bluebird" blue body and black fenders is very eye catching.

 

Is that a picnic basket on the running board? Imagine going on a summer picnic in 1910 with that, and with your wife wearing a typical long, white cotton dress and big white hat that women wore back then.

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