JRA

Wicker door panel

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Hello Folks, 

I have always admired wicker inserts of door panels in some 1920’s cars. The picture below shows the front door of 1926 Lincoln sedan. 

What kind of makes and body types used to have such type of inserts? When were they common? Mid to late 1920’s? 
I have seen external and internal finishings using wicker inserts, so I am curious about this option.

Thanks

JRA

67D30561-8335-467E-BF7F-83AB3D9B554D.jpeg

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I saw a roadster at a show with wicker painted exterior door panels. It was one of the coolest looking paint jobs I have seen on an old car. Owner said it was replicated from the original finish. I believe it was a willys/ willys-knight?

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There is wicker or canework shown on a car in this current thread:

Although hard to see detail.

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Wicker or wicker like cane work was used primarily on cars of European manufacture or if on American made chassis cars the body most of the time was made in Europe.

What looks like cane work or wicker as shown in the photos on exterior surfaces was thick paint  not cane or wicker at all. Some European cars ( usually not the larger chassis types ) had whole bodies constructed out of wicker, this was more popular in France then anywhere else. It was a fad in the mid to late 1920s as mentioned and also at the same time was the fad to use snake skin for upholstery. Alpina water snake skin was a fad for about 2 or 3 years in select cars that appeared in the custom body salons . About 40 years ago I heard of a Duesenberg model J conv in the Pacific northwest that still had the water snake skin in the rumble seat area as flaps to lift over the sides of the body  to rest your arm on.

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I have NEVER seen cane work on the inside of a car, and will admit to having been around cars a bit. So I would say it’s very, very unusual. I have seen a custom one off Fleetwood town car, upholstered in unborn calf skin..........the owner thought it was softer.......people are very strange..............or, add your own adjatiave...............too much money and too little brains.

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The picture above of the interior wicker door panel is an original factory photography  from 1926 Dietrich custom body Lincoln Model L.

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5 minutes ago, JRA said:

The picture above of the interior wicker door panel is an original factory photography  from 1926 Dietrich custom body Lincoln Model L.


 

Sounds right........but after looking at thousands of cars for 50 years, I have never seen cane work inside. 

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11 minutes ago, edinmass said:


 

Sounds right........but after looking at thousands of cars for 50 years, I have never seen cane work inside. 

 

 

I don't think that interior feature is cane work, looks like something Aunt Helen would stitch up, I'll try to find the name for it. Bob 

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Crochet, that is what they call it. Had to type in crochet table cloth, there are pages of crochet swim suits & tops. Bob 

OIP (2).jpg

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There used to be a car in the Imperial Palace collection that had wicker on the outside of the car.

If I remember correctly it was an Isotta Fraschini from the 20's.

I would have to dig through my boxes of pictures to see if I have a picture of the car.

It would have been taken long before digital cameras were common.

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External cane work was common, especially on Brewster Coachwork in the states. Also seen of Fleetwood, and many others.

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1937 Lincoln, with nice cane work on the rear body section. Very regal and tasteful.

29F9A4EC-9283-4A13-B3B3-D9052D570B8B.png

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Posted (edited)

Thought I should post this picture of this Lincoln from "National auto Museum"-Reno. This is all that I could get, and I couldn't seem to enlarge it. Maybe someone could do something with this.

Yellow and Black Car

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)

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5 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Marlborough Town Car (1)

 

1930 Marlborough Town Car by Brewster | Rolls royce, Rolls royce ...

Same car with different drivers compartment roof and different spare tire locations?? 

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Still no references of internal door panels. The original factory picture reproduced above was taken at the 1926 New York Salon Show, of a 4-passengers Dietrich sedan. I am sure it was widely adopted in custom coach built. 
JRA

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2 hours ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

Thought I should post this picture of this Lincoln from "National auto Museum"-Reno. This is all that I could get, and I couldn't seem to enlarge it. Maybe someone could do something with this.

Yellow and Black Car

This Judkins bodied model L Lincoln does not have any wicker on it, the yellow you see is yellow paint . If you go to the thread "Period images to relieve some of the stress" you will see a photo of the original rendering that was done when the car first appeared at the custom Body Salons . In the small image it is hard to see if it is a wicker paint pattern or smooth paint.  I have seen the car in person in Reno.

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Have heard of the fake wicker effect on the outside of some limousines and town cars, have not seen it for interior decor but that does not mean much. Designers were always looking for novel effect in color and material especially for show cars. Exotic animal hides, fancy brocades, ultra modern color schemes, elaborate instrument panels and accessory packages were all tried. The idea of wicker door panels seems rather mild. It looks like ready made chair seat material.

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1927-1930 was the era of trying to go “over the top” with interior upholstery and appointments. Snake skin, shark skin, gold plated hardware, exotic woods used in interior cabinetry. Rhino horn spinners on window cranks, ivory inlay on smoking sets, rear instruments showing speed, time, ect. It also was when hot air and hot water heaters were coming on line, and included cross flow ventilation. Foot hassocks heated with hot coals, and yes, air conditioning was first installed in 1910. Nothing is new. When Harry Earl started the Art & Colour section making designer type cars........everything was tried.......not much stuck. Most super wealthy owners had good taste that was conservative. Having a chauffeur in “this year’s” style suit, that was also important. It was a different era, and I shall never return again.

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Back in 2007 Nethercutt had a number of cars with "canework" panels including a '28 Minerva, '20 Packard and a couple of RR's.

 

'28 Minerva.JPG

'20 Packard.JPG

'30 RR Phantom 11.JPG

RR W- Canework.JPG

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Posted (edited)

Walt,

 

I've seen the Lincoln about a dozen times. It was my was my impression that it was caned. It has been a while, maybe I was confusing it with another car.

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)

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13 hours ago, edinmass said:

1927-1930 was the era of trying to go “over the top” with interior upholstery and appointments. Snake skin, shark skin, gold plated hardware, exotic woods used in interior cabinetry. Rhino horn spinners on window cranks, ivory inlay on smoking sets, rear instruments showing speed, time, ect. It also was when hot air and hot water heaters were coming on line, and included cross flow ventilation. Foot hassocks heated with hot coals, and yes, air conditioning was first installed in 1910. Nothing is new. When Harry Earl started the Art & Colour section making designer type cars........everything was tried.......not much stuck. Most super wealthy owners had good taste that was conservative. Having a chauffeur in “this year’s” style suit, that was also important. It was a different era, and I shall never return again.

You also in the period had the theory going in certain circle regarding "plain and simple was modern" and fussy was antiquated - i think this has a lot to do with today when people run up to some town car or ... expecting an opulent interior and and then you see their reaction of "it's so plain inside."

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I have seen this caning done on car sides over the many years and wondered just HOW that was done . Today it would be a vinyl applique , but they didn't have that then . And I'm sure it wasn't striped. Perhaps some were real cane but many were a paint process . Thanks for any answers !

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Some pictures from Lincoln Photo Archive. 1923 Brunn and 1927 Judkins coach work. Sorry for bad position of pictures.E26A58F8-9EF8-4A4F-A55A-4246B9E6BFC3.jpeg.1448f633ca539d97cd1aae3adab03015.jpeg

25550EB9-DC7F-449C-AA06-0A10235BDD8F.jpeg

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I think this car possibly survives - the Esther Price Candy Collection that one of my earlier Auburn's came from had a Sedan with supposedly a paneled interior and interestingly a built in bustle trunk on the rear - it was partially restored = not sure where it was sold to. 

 

E26A58F8-9EF8-4A4F-A55A-4246B9E6BFC3.jpeg.1448f633ca539d97cd1aae3adab03015.jpeg.7c887ae288e1a71fa86c91f4e2a3a41c.jpeg

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