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The phone rang... and then the next car adventure starts


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2 hours ago, padgett said:

At least not like a "modern" SLK Mercedes: if the console gets wet it won't shift. A convertible you can't get wet.


 

Sold my SLK last month............😎

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Let’s see.......mine was an AMG ragtop with 44 k on the clock. 100 mph on 95 felt like you were idling. It was expensive to drive, as I went through tires quite a bit. I only sold it because of the assxxle protesters down here making it a target while driving through downtown. Four problems in less than 90 days. Two looked down the wrong end of my SIG to get them to back up. Which they did. Yesterday I had an issue with them coming up to my White while parked at a long stop light. They were bitching at me, and as they started to head over they got the same treatment. You can work hard all your life, save and plan ahead, and try and enjoy the benefits of your labor when the “new breed if imbeciles” come looking for trouble. They almost messed themselves when you fight back..........I refuse to become a victim to these “human mental wasteland retards.”

Notice there is NO POLITICAL comments.....just me being assaulted and not taking the BS.  The shame is it’s been going on too long without repercussions.......until a federal installation is attacked.  I feel bad for all the small business people who lost everything in the riots. Anyway......back to cars! 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Back to the 1917 White. 
 

I could have taken the easy road and used JB weld or some such modern, half assed super glue to try and hold my car together....(impeller and shaft).......but I don’t do hack work. I’m very fortunate that we have such a great bunch of guys here helping out on a difficult project. I made the extras to give to two museums who have cars that will probably never run again in the next fifty years. Why? A debt of honor.........its selfish to make difficult and expensive parts and not think of the future and for a chance for the cars to get back on the road. I plan on visiting both museums, to look over the cars and take photos. I don’t want to knock on the door empty handed. Giving them a casting for a future opportunity to have their car on the road is better than a cash donation that is quickly spent on non car related things........So one will go to the town car in the Cleveland Car Museum, and the other to the Peterson Museum. I hope to hell they don’t lose or toss the impellers away. I will probably place them in the car or wire them under hood.........I’ll figure it out when I get there. 
 

A project worth doing, is worth doing right. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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LOL, I'd like to see someone steal that White. Instead of fighting them off, let them try to take it, make it run, and record the fun!

 

It's like every Derpstein at a car show who says, "Hey, you left your keys in the car, ain't you askeered someone's gonna steal it?"

 

I tell them, "If you can figure out how to start it, it's yours."

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26 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I don’t want to knock on the door empty handed.

 

Ed, that is a great attitude! A number of years ago I needed some info from a museum. Since I was making a set for myself, I etched a patent plate and engine tag for them.  They were thrilled and so appreciative. Fostering new friends and contacts is always good!

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I've made donations to museums before. Bettwer than just sitting on them. Agree its partly the learning process how to make things. One you make one particularly via casting, it is easy to make more. I guess that 1/8" you mentioned would remove the sprues ?

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36 minutes ago, padgett said:

 I guess that 1/8" you mentioned would remove the sprues ?

Its whats known as machining allowance. When designing the pattern you take into account that some surfaces of the casting will be machined so you adjust the size of the pattern in those areas to provide extra material to be machined away. For instance if I have a casting that will be faced on one side, on the pattern I will add 1/8" to the side that will be milled away. That way I can ensure I have enough material to remove to provide a nice machined face without casting defects or irregularities. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

I tell them, "If you can figure out how to start it, it's yours."

 

 

Better be careful with things like that. Can't remember where it was, some family thing years ago, I was going somewhere a distance from home, by myself, and spotted a local car show. Not in any hurry to get there, I swung into the parking lot. Walking around, looking like any dummy off the street, looking at a 1934ish Chevrolet. The owner says to me "I bet you a hundred bucks you can't start this car?" I tell him "I won't take that bet, although I am pretty sure I know how." He says "Show me!" So I did. 

Of course what he didn't know, was that a couple years before, a very good friend of mine did almost the same thing to me when he had just gotten his 1934 Chevrolet master back onto the road. And what my friend didn't know, was that when I was little, there was a similar year Chevy in the family, and I had seen how it was started and remembered it.

For those not familiar with them. Chevrolet and a number of other marques (both GM and not) used what was called the 'starterator'. One turned on the key, then had to press the clutch and gas pedals, in a somewhat certain way.

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When in doubt, I just used a quarter on the solenoid. Remember being in Detroit at a show and the marketcritter was extolling the antitheft features of a Vega. Hood was open and solenoid an easy reach...

Also back in the daze had a standing bet i could walk up to a car with nothing in my hands and have it open in a few seconds. Dipstick worked very well.

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Many years ago I would occasionally have to leave my 1910 REO parked...it always attracted attention, most of it admirable but I was always concerned some nitwit would try to start it. It was a crank starting car ... I would leave it with the spark advanced.

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7 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

LOL, I'd like to see someone steal that White. Instead of fighting them off, let them try to take it, make it run, and record the fun!

 

It's like every Derpstein at a car show who says, "Hey, you left your keys in the car, ain't you askeered someone's gonna steal it?"

 

I tell them, "If you can figure out how to start it, it's yours."


 

The White is surprisingly easy to start........keys work fine, but I just leave it unlocked and use the battery shut off to keep it safe.

 

At Auburn last year........SOMEONE left the keys in the ignition of JN-565 out in the hotel parking lot with the top down............at two am the manager spotted them and knocked on my door and gave them to me. Oops!😇

 

Fortunately there were only five people staying in the tourist class hotel who knew how to start a Duesenberg........and they were all with us! 👍 PS- don’t tell the boss........🤫

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Another interesting day with the “Great White”. I was supposed to get the new tires Friday so I can spend the entire weekend putting all six on the car without overdoing it on any one particular day. Since every delivery service is behind by days or weeks the tires didn't arrive until 11 AM this morning. Feeling ambitious I decided to put all six on. I’m getting too old for this. There are multiple rings, snap rings 27 inch Firestone rims. Tires are 37 x 5. I started at noon and finished at 5 o’clock. And I took two or three 30 minute brakes. I was able to remove the tire off the car, and R&R the tire, and reinstall each one in less than 30 minutes. Not too bad for an old man.  Photos below. 

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, car crazy said:

While I've not met you, pretty sure I might have seen you and your car on the road today on Olive Ave-if so, you were moving right along!

Guilty! I live in Flamingo Park.......I prefer Olive to Rt 1. Stoped and visited a few friends in El Cid. Good news.....found a car to buy! I’m not spilling the beans on it yet.

 

Did you sell your 34 Packard? 
 

 

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13 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Guilty! I live in Flamingo Park.......I prefer Olive to Rt 1. Stoped and visited a few friends in El Cid. Good news.....found a car to buy! I’m not spilling the beans on it yet.

 

Did you sell your 34 Packard? 
 

 

I'm in El Cid, so best to keep your new find a secret!..Seems when I buy another car, I think it might be a good idea to sell one-but seems I can never bring myself to actually sell a car- decided to keep the '34 Packard, along with the rest..

 

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3 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

Many years ago I would occasionally have to leave my 1910 REO parked...it always attracted attention, most of it admirable but I was always concerned some nitwit would try to start it. It was a crank starting car ... I would leave it with the spark advanced.

 

I do the same thing with my old vehicles.

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5 minutes ago, Larry Schramm said:

The tires look great.  When I wear out the tires for my '15 Buick truck, I plan on putting on the BF Goodrich tires on.  I think they look good on a large car and I have been told that they wear well.


 

I hope they last a LONG time.........four grand all in on tires, tubes, rim strips, shipping, and tax. Plus my labor. Tire prices have gone insane.

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1 hour ago, wayne sheldon said:

They do look great!

I hope you are keeping the old ones?


 

Tires are going to Joe P on this forum.......for his 1910 project. I already sent him the tubes.👍

 

Got to take care of the “family” here!

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2 hours ago, SC38DLS said:

Time for a long ride at a moderate speed (or faster!) 


Moderate? Can’t do that. Time for a final top end speed run. I can’t drive 55! Time to let the horses out of the barn and run free...........Soon, we will know “the end of the world on a 1917 Dual Valve White”.............I see 80mph in my future.............😏

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:


 

Tires are going to Joe P on this forum.......for his 1910 project. I already sent him the tubes.👍

 

Got to take care of the “family” here!

 

Good deal! Keeping them in the family counts as keeping them!

Good old tires need to be put to good use.

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"top end speed run" Where ? Used to be able to use 441. PBIR (whatever it is called now) may not have a long enough straight. On the other side of 710 Pratt has a 4 mile straight but doubt that you have access.

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1 hour ago, padgett said:

"top end speed run" Where ? Used to be able to use 441. PBIR (whatever it is called now) may not have a long enough straight. On the other side of 710 Pratt has a 4 mile straight but doubt that you have access.

 

I will run it on Southern Boulevard along the airport runway............if I time the light right, I can hit it flat out on the top of the bridge and take advantage of the slight dow hill for 1/4 mile..............early Sunday morning it should be little to no traffic. Will try for a gps screen shot....if it's safe to do so. Remember: Drive it like you stole it!

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 I'm having visions of a busy interstate highway with traffic running 75-80 mph and all of sudden here goes this 1917 White sailing past in the left lane, driver laughing maniacally like the Mailman in "Funny Farm". Crum Petree?

 

 

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2 hours ago, SC38DLS said:

Should we start a “go fund me” for bail money?  


Might need it Saturday afternoon after we run the McLaren!

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9 hours ago, padgett said:

Does AAA still have a bail bond feature ?


It should read......

 

   Does the AACA have a bail bond feature? I hope so, or your entertainment may suddenly fall off a clif!

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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  • 4 weeks later...

Update:

 

It’s been a while since I posted anything on the Great White..........It seems I have suffered a injury related to old age, and have a bad right arm that’s keeping me from doing any useful work for the next 10-12 weeks or possibly longer. It’s a rather painful injury........compare it to your third divorce in ten years with no prenuptial! I’ll live.......but it’s going to slow things down a bit. Still have my trusty side kick Phil. So we will keep picking at the car. The tour is coming up fast, and a I have sent in my registration over a week ago. Looking forward to having it out on the open road. The shaft and the impellers arrived safely, and NASA couldn’t have done a better job than Gary or Joe. Two fantastic gentlemen..........THANK YOU!

 

 

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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We decided to tackle the rear axel seal leak..........and at the same time, do the brakes, and install new wheel bearings. Another “easy” job.......NOT!

 

So, one interesting thing about the White........it’s over built, too heavy, and once you figure it out, simple to work on. It’s the learning curve of the era that tosses the curve balls. Fortunately we have a very detailed owners manual......we can blow up the diagrams and actually see what is going on, and the parts list also helps. And away we go..........

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Phil......”With the hands like George the Animal Steel” got down to work, and with some assistance from myself, we got the drivers side apart. The rear wheel bearing is over six inches in diameter, weighs over seven pounds, and can set you back up to 850 dollars each......depending on the supplier. So much for its easy to get, and off the shelf. Anyway, we have a bad bearing on the drivers side, so we ALWAYS do it right........two are on the way. Interesting brake system, it’s about as complicated as a gimbal thrust nozzle on the Space Shuttle main engine pack. Have you ever seen copper friction material on an automobile? It was a new one to me, and everyone I spoke to. The car has a copper sheet riveted to the cast iron shoes, just like it was woven material of the era. Seems this technology came from the oil fields, and after some scientific and engineering   investigations into the coefficient of friction of copper on cast steel.........it’s a slick set up. It’s made to disperse water and OIL......yes, it’s self cleaning. I admit it works. First drive we had the car out in the open road, the fire burned off all the oil......and it was clean and good as new. Like the rest of the car, the rear brakes are very well made, complicated, and have way too many parts. Good news is everything looks brand new........so we will get everything cleaned up and serviced. They should be perfect when we are done. 

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I'd certainly never heard of that. The brake bands were intact on the extremely early Panhard chassis I once owned and they had little blocks of wood riveted to them - which says something for how long the chassis had been off the road since I think those had been abandoned by 1900. Somewhere I read that they used lignum vitae. The wood brake lining worked but would burst into flames if over used and, sure enough, the little pieces on my chassis were clearly charred. Are the drums unusually thick? I'm just wondering if this is something worth copying in a different application. I just happen to have several pieces of thick sheet copper and was wondering what I'd ever do with them!

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

We decided to tackle the rear axel seal leak..........and at the same time, do the brakes, and install new wheel bearings. Another “easy” job.......NOT!

 

So, one interesting thing about the White........it’s over built, too heavy, and once you figure it out, simple to work on. It’s the learning curve of the era that tosses the curve balls. Fortunately we have a very detailed owners manual......we can blow up the diagrams and actually see what is going on, and the parts list also helps. And away we go..........

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Looks like time for new grease 

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Interestingly, of the 100's of cars most of the time I have been very fortunate to develop the problem or foresee the problem when in the neighborhood running errands or ....

 

Did I mention that time(s) of driving the 1941 Cadillac home from tours with bad universal joints or that time with a bad rear wheel bearing, the time with the bad radiator, the time with the hole that sprung in the oil pan, the bad water pumps, and .... - 80K miles of touring (July 1979 - I was age 14 to 2015) with a 1941 car was not really an adventure, but it had its moments.  Snowed in currently - tried that once with it too (we had to shovel the street to get it into the driveway = talk about sliding all over the place). 

 

Or, rebuilding carb on Franklin in like 15 minutes to leave home 10 minutes later.  Spun a rod bearing.  Burnt up a axle bearing - fire extinguisher in hand to fortunately not be used. 

 

The 31 Cadillac purring in the drive while flames shot out the hood doors. 

 

Adventures with Packard Electromatic clutch and overdrive (+ 10 quarts of oil in a day for another problem) - Packard's do not stick around too long.

 

8 gallons of antifreeze and 10 quarts of oil in Auburn via bad cylinder hear, but made it home to pull in driveway to immediately change cars and make dinner reservations.  Or, that entire afternoon of driving home from ACD Festival to home with no brakes (made dinner reservations that trip too). 

 

And the list goes on and on, on and on, and .....

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