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The phone rang... and then the next car adventure starts


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Don’t we all have a hobby that cost as much as a mistress?  Is  fun (of a different kind of course) to do, can be a problem at times, and our wife’s usually don’t understand why!  I’ve been married 50 years and still love both my wife and this mistress called old cars!  

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1 hour ago, Robert G. Smits said:

What are we going to do in our spare time IF this ever ends. When I wake up in the am I grab my phone and check for updates. My wife thinks I have a mistress. 

 

Bob....no worries.......my other new car is in safe storage until we start the next thread.

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"hobby that cost as much as a mistress" nowhere near unless she shops at the mart at the wall.

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1 minute ago, padgett said:

"hobby that cost as much as a mistress" nowhere near unless she shops at the mart at the wall.


You’re buying the wrong cars! A good car costs as much as a third wife, a girlfriend, and a mistress all at the same time...........not conjecture.........that’s experience! At least a good car is lower maintenance!

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8 minutes ago, alsancle said:

When I visit Ed next month I will take some decent videos for him.


Never fear.......AJ has learned all his film making skills from Harvey Weinstein..........🤔

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8 minutes ago, padgett said:

Looks like the headlamp bar is in the way of the crank. How do you start it ?


Only Godzilla could crank this thing......it has a compression release, and it works great. I haven’t tried to crank it by hand to start it yet.......once I have it dialed in, I will certainly try it. It’s a 12 volt system, and the car spins over like a new car.........so I don’t think I will ever really have to crank it.

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I would love too but with braces on both legs I would hesitate for fear of not being quick enough on the brakes. I’ll be more than happy for a short ride and just to be able to walk around it. What a treasure. 

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1 hour ago, SC38DLS said:

I would love too but with braces on both legs I would hesitate for fear of not being quick enough on the brakes. I’ll be more than happy for a short ride and just to be able to walk around it. What a treasure. 


It’s an easy driver.........come on down and try......it’s just a car. And surprisingly easy to handle for 1917. We have some easy roads down here that shouldn’t be a problem.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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O-o-o-oh Yeah! Twenty-six seconds of the best ride I have had in over a year! That thing sounds so perfect!

Wow, IF you do get out here for Modoc next year? I don't know if I will be able to get away, but I will WANT to get out and see that fantastic car!

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This is an ariel photo taken of the White factory in 1936.   It appears the main office was in the tall building in the center with the power plant right behind it.   The outline around it shows it was quite a large operation by the mid 30s when their production concentrated solely on trucks.  That's Lake Erie to the North of it.    It's all gone now.    

 

 

White Motor Company Factory 1936 CP02774

Edited by K8096 (see edit history)
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That’s the third and big factory. The first two were later sold. I am not sure if their location. The Rubay body building also,was purchased by white, along with the Kundtz woodworking plant.

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3 hours ago, K8096 said:

You said you have an owners manual for your car, right?   What address does it give for contacting the factory?    


It only gives cities and states with a retail dealership.......it doesn’t give addresses. I think there were more dealers......the listing is probably factory owned showrooms. 

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25 minutes ago, Robert G. Smits said:

Great Video's and worth the wait.  How common were OD transmissions in Pre War cars.  My 12 Garford has a similar transmission and I know some Winton's had them.  Were they all made by the same company?


White made their own transmissions, as well as carburetors, and many other items. The only outsourced parts I can identify are starter, generator, and magneto. Lights are all White only........which is very unusual in 1917. 

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Ed,  I’ve shown the videos to a couple non car guys, you’ll love this response from two different guys totally independent of hearing the other “Is that a Duesenberg? It must be worth a   ton of money! “. I kid you not two non car guys saying the same thing. When I said it is probably rarer than a Duesenberg in survival rate they were amazed. Just thought you would enjoy that. 
dave s 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
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To all non-car guys they're all rare and worth a fortune, owned and driven by only the rich people.

Anything prior to 1930 is a Model T Ford and anything thing big is Rolls Royce or a Duesenberg.

Anybody with gray hair and a old car is probably the original owner or if the paint is faded, it's a barn

find and worth millions.

It's our job to politely educate them without being condescending.  When I want to say, "If I was the

original owner, I would be 128+ years old and I think  I look pretty good for being that old.  I guess this

hobby keeps people forever young."

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I think the most important lessons someone can learn from this car are the following:

 

Always buy the best car you can afford in regards to condition.

 

Always get help from the experts before you spend your money.

 

Don't buy the first car you see.........or the next ten.
 

When you find a good car....like this one, things are much easier to resolve than a car that has been

             through the hands of twenty people and shops.

 

Take your time in your search.........give yourself six months minimum to look for a car.

 

Unmolested cars are very difficult to find......but worth the wait and extra expense.

 

Fix you car right, the first time. Don’t try and take a short cut or do temporary repairs.

 

Don’t try and drive a car until you understand it, it’s problems, and don’t be in a hurry to take it on long trips. 

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9 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I think the most important lessons someone can learn from this car are the following:

 

Always buy the best car you can afford in regards to condition.

 

Always get help from the experts before you spend your money.

 

Don't buy the first car you see.........or the next ten.
 

When you find a good car....like this one, things are much easier to resolve than a car that has been

             through the hands of twenty people and shops.

 

Take your time in your search.........give yourself six months minimum to look for a car.

 

Unmolested cars are very difficult to find......but worth the wait and extra expense.

 

Fix you car right, the first time. Don’t try and take a short cut or do temporary repairs.

 

Don’t try and drive a car until you understand it, it’s problems, and don’t be in a hurry to take it on long trips. 

Ed, I read slowly through your list of important lessons. Then I read it through a second time.......  then I thought to myself “has Ed been secretly following me around the last 30 years and used me as his example of foolish behavior?”  I have made every one of those mistakes, and sadly, am frequently tempted to repeat them again and again. 
 

The White is fantastic. I am about a three hour drive from Gilmore and look forward to seeing it up there in the future.   
 

john

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Ed

Your last three sentences of advice are well stated and completely true, anyone reading them - DO NOT STRAY  from this advice.

Both Ed and I and some others on this forum have been around some time ( I bought my first old car in 1963, first attended Hershey in 1965, did frame up, nut and bolt restorations on at least 2 cars that were orphan makes ( from mechanical to paint) and have researched and studied some period material to be able to pen stories to recognize what happened 80 + years ago )

Stay enthused and even excited but be realistic that you need to "do your homework"  join the club that focus on the cars you like and if you are reading this and do not belong to AACA - JOIN!!!!!

I will only add that if you can get a ride in a car of the era you are interested in , that will give you some insight into what you will have to encounter and endure as an owner.

Walt

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Well done, Ed and AJ!  Excellent videos!  Looking forward to more through-the-windshield video when you get plates, especially when you catch 4th (OD) gear.

 

Did somebody send you some Modoc County dirt to apply to those new tires?  (I'm still working on removing that dirt from my 1918's tires.)  I'm laughing at the juxtaposition of dirtying up new tires to fit in with an all-original car vs. picking blades of grass out of tires on high-end showfields.....

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As one who resembles Ed's remarks about car buying advice, I am so glad he has the White on the road as a sorted out vehicle. It has only taken me 8 years to sort out my 1925 Buick to where I can jump in and take off to points unknown without major tribulation. There is always something to upgrade once the process is underway. Performance, safety etc. But it is a true joy to have a vehicle you have confidence in. I hope to see you and the White at Hershey someday.

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