Jump to content

The phone rang... and then the next car adventure starts


Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, George Cole said:

 

As do Cole cars.  But they're direct drive from the transmission, not a pto shaft drive.  Compared to everything else on Ed's 'new' White car, that pto shaft doesn't look over-engineered and sufficiently robust to drive a vintage tow truck mechanical gear drive or hydraulic pump.  But obviously looks can be deceiving as apparently it was.

My 13 Cole has The tire pump in the engine compartment.  It was a Taylor Noil automatic tire pump.  You engage the big gear and it moves the flapper to create air.  It’s all the way to the right in the pictures.  

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The air pump on the White is unusual from many that I have seen, as it was plumed into the car and the connection was made in the tool box on the drivers side. The hardware inside the box is all nickel finished.......just about the only brightwork on the car. The crankcase for the pump is cast into the engine block, and the oil for the pump is entirely separate from the engine. The engineers at White, along with their pattern makers were very talented.............the most interesting thing about the car was it’s design to be very simple, rugged, and need very little service except for lubrication. This thing has more grease fittings on it than you can shake a stick at........it’s impressive and intimidating. The logic in design is very good, lending it to be very simple to service. They used many over sized fasteners I think to keep the number of different tools to a minimum. You simply can’t break anything on it, as every part is three times over engineered. It’s got to tip the scales at 1000 pounds more than most cars in its class.........they just kept adding steel and aluminum. Several speedster guys have eyed it very hard........wanting to toss the body, chop the frame, and have a lightning fast speedster. I’m glad I got ahold of it........because if the speedster guys wound up with it......it would be gone. At 72 horsepower for a big four.........and the oil bath clutch with the overdrive......this thing would easily push any Mercer or Stutz from the day.......and yes, I have driven both of them. The steering on the White is surprisingly light from just pushing it in and out of the shop. I find it easier to get in and out on the front passenger side.............but I keep forgetting with the walk through seating, any door but the drivers door is fine. It’s easy for me to stand up in the rear and walk to the front seat just by bending at the waist............it’s easy to forget how tall this thing is. My only complaint about it so far..........the running board is very, very high up of the ground........and at 6’1” and long legs, I have to be careful stepping down and not falling over.  UPDATE- just measured the running board height from the ground 18 1/2 inches.
 

Overall, I’m stunned at the quality of this machine. There is a reason it cost as much as a Pierce, Packard 12, or a Loco. I have zero doubt this thing will run with ANY pre WW1 car...........it’s been nothing but a joy working on and discovering what a truly amazing machine this is. I can see already it’s going to need self restraint when driving it.......I like speed, and this thing is definitely a gigantic hot rod...........so temperance with the throttle is called for at all times. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, edinmass said:

The air pump on the White is unusual from many that I have seen, as it was plumed into the car and the connection was made in the tool box on the drivers side. The hardware inside the box is all nickel finished.......just about the only brightwork on the car. The crankcase for the pump is cast into the engine block, and the oil for the pump is entirely separate from the engine. The engineers at White, along with their pattern makers were very talented.............the most interesting thing about the car was it’s design to be very simple, rugged, and need very little service except for lubrication. This thing has more grease fittings on it than you can shake a stick at........it’s impressive and intimidating. The logic in design is very good, lending it to be very simple to service. They used many over sized fasteners I think to keep the number of different tools to a minimum. You simply can’t break anything on it, as every part is three times over engineered. It’s got to tip the scales at 1000 pounds more than most cars in its class.........they just kept adding steel and aluminum. Several speedster guys have eyed it very hard........wanting to toss the body, chop the frame, and have a lightning fast speedster. I’m glad I got ahold of it........because if the speedster guys wound up with it......it would be gone. At 72 horsepower for a big four.........and the oil bath clutch with the overdrive......this thing would easily push any Mercer or Stutz from the day.......and yes, I have driven both of them. The steering on the White is surprisingly light from just pushing it in and out of the shop. I find it easier to get in and out on the front passenger side.............but I keep forgetting with the walk through seating, any door but the drivers door is fine. It’s easy for me to stand up in the rear and walk to the front seat just by bending at the waist............it’s easy to forget how tall this thing is. My only complaint about it so far..........the running board is very, very high up of the ground........and at 6’1” and long legs, I have to be careful stepping down and not falling over. 
 

Overall, I’m stunned at the quality of this machine. There is a reason it cost as much as a Pierce, Packard 12, or a Loco. I have zero doubt this thing will run with ANY pre WW1 car...........it’s been nothing but a joy working on and discovering what a truly amazing machine this is. I can see already it’s going to need self restraint when driving it.......I like speed, and this thing is definitely a gigantic hot rod...........so temperance with the throttle is called for at all times. 

 

First of all,  where are the pictures of the air pump?  Second aren't you supposed to be working on my car and not surfing on your iPad?

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Your car is all apart......will start looking for all the misplaced parts in the next few weeks. What ever happened to that parts car you had.........hope you didn’t sell it, we may need it for a few things.........you would think we couldn’t misplace the cylinder head on a big straight eight...........and a few spare pistons and rods would be nice also.

 

Besides........why are you complaining........I’m still working on a Cleveland car.......just a more interesting one than yours!😝
 

By the way, last night a 8 I was working on the factory carburetor.............what were you doing?

6FD05286-D865-4E95-96E4-D674CEE4BBFA.jpeg

0443F627-B49D-4E32-BE2D-2C8EDD2ACC96.jpeg

732AB857-2F3A-4DEF-B8D8-6643EFD4229C.jpeg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, edinmass said:


 

If only a dollar per view went to the restoration cost! 
 

Im glad people are enjoying it. It’s keeping me motivated.......just left the shop again, went through the factory White carburetor. It’s a barrel valve......not sure what Carbking thinks of them..........I expect not too much. We shall see......we will run them both. First I will run the factory unit. It looks brand new.......just like the rest of the car.

 

Carbking is awaiting your driving impressions when comparing a rotary carburetor to a plain tube carburetor!

 

This is only the third original application of a rotary throttle carburetor of which I am aware, and I have not heard of any driving impressions of the other two. The other two were 1915 Austin, and 1915-16 Owen-Magnetic, both which used Master carbs. Owen-Magnetic switched to Zenith in 1917. Austin switched to Stromberg in 1916. Both the Stromberg and the Zenith were plain tube carburetors.

 

The big name in rotary carbs has always been Winfield; but those that I know who have tried them have been disappointed in all conditions except wide open throttle (i.e. racing). Really interested to see a comparison by someone knowledgeable in carburetors.

 

Preconceived ideas of things that occurred before our fathers were born, based on literature available, is far less useful than actual testing.

 

Jon.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

We run Winfields on a 1933 ice racer my friend has........the car was built pre war, and the ice race still takes place on the same lake today............weed tire chains and motorcycle chains wrapped around the tire........the car is always running flat out...........and the Stutz Special also had them......AJ's car......... 

RestorationHeader1.jpg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed. It’s funny but I bet you have said “The most interesting thing about this car is .....” ten or twelve times. Each time you work on another part. Just admit it “This whole car is one of the top three or four you have ever had the pleasure of working on and is absolutely one of the most amazing. And you own it! “

The fact you can save it is also very cool

dave s 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s not cool because I own it.......but from the early White gas cars I have ridden in and played with......this is a total different animal. I don’t see many new things on cars I work on today, this car has a bunch of them. 
 

Two tires done......first took 27 minutes to get apart.....and it kicked my ass. It’s been about thirty years since I have done this style two piece snap ring and collar wheel. I have done hundreds of regular snap ring tires over the years, and countless drop center’s all by hand. The second tire took 11 minutes ............   I think the rest will take less than that now that I have a plan/system to do them. Tomorrow is hot pressure wash the oil pan and wind age tray, clean the splash pans......a terrible job.....I rather change tires.........remove the gas tank guage and drop it off to have it boiled out at the radiator and tank shop, remove two more tires, finishing the rebuild on the generator, finish rebuilding the factory carb, start on the Zenith carb, figure out correct linkage for both of them, flush the transmission and rear end, finish the evapo rust pump set up, and another dozen things I can’t remember right now. Also have to finish the Stearns Knight oil bypass valve, and install a carburetor on a 68 Ford. And that’s all before and after my regular work day......I wonder why I am so tired? 
 

One additional note.......all new tires on the car......but all the tubes were old used ones......both of them so far had patches..........old time car collectors.

133DBDAE-E5B0-4593-847D-D2A452D088DA.jpeg

09B965D5-661A-4E0D-A31D-F79C0C2D3781.jpeg

5958E4A4-0617-456B-86A3-83A36AF65FA6.jpeg

6756757F-D080-49FD-AD53-96793A5594A7.jpeg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Received an interesting report this morning, that the 1915 Dual Valve White.........which I believe is a prototype or pre production car was out and about yesterday. They finally got it on an open stretch of road and tried the overdrive gear. The speed limit on the road was 45 mph......they got the car up to 55 mph easily and backed off at that point for safety and speed limit reasons......and the car had more to go. The car is a closed car, and the owner is cautious as it is top heavy. Looking forward to setting  the touring car free in overdrive and run it up to maximum speed to see what that is.........and I promise a video when it happens!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, edinmass said:

It’s not cool because I own it.......but from the early White gas cars I have ridden in and played with......this is a total different animal. I don’t see many new things on cars I work on today, this car has a bunch of them. 
 

Two tires done......first took 27 minutes to get apart.....and it kicked my ass. It’s been about thirty years since I have done this style two piece snap ring and collar wheel. I have done hundreds of regular snap ring tires over the years, and countless drop center’s all by hand. The second tire took 11 minute............I think the rest will take less than that now that I have a plan/system to do them. Tomorrow is hot pressure wash the oil pan and wind age tray, clean the splash pans......a terrible job.....I rather change tires.........remove the gas tank guage and drop it off to have it boiled out at the radiator and tank shop, remove two more tires, finishing the rebuild on the generator, finish rebuilding the factory carb, start on the Zenith carb, figure out correct linkage for both of them, flush the transmission and rear end, finish the evapo rust pump set up, and another dozen things I can’t remember right now. Also have to finish the Stearns Knight oil bypass valve, and install a carburetor on a 68 Ford. And that’s all before and after my regular work day......I wonder why I am so tired? 
 

One additional note.......all new tires on the car......but all the tubes were old used ones......both of them so far had patches..........old time car collectors.

133DBDAE-E5B0-4593-847D-D2A452D088DA.jpeg

09B965D5-661A-4E0D-A31D-F79C0C2D3781.jpeg

5958E4A4-0617-456B-86A3-83A36AF65FA6.jpeg

6756757F-D080-49FD-AD53-96793A5594A7.jpeg

 

You are making me very envious Ed ! The one I have to deal with will  take more than 27 Minutes guaranteed.  Tire is truly rock hard, I suspect it is close to 100 years old.

Any makers stamps on the inside of the rim ?  I almost always find some although on the rims I usually end up with rust sometimes makes them un- readable.

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine are Firestone 27’s. When your ready, pm me for my number, and I will give you some pointers.  They pop right off..........😜

 

 

And, they jump back on with no effort!   All it takes is a little bit of effort.......sweat, blood, and cursing!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The biggest problem is that the tires are literally rock hard.  Squeezing the bead area together to allow the side ring to move inward enough to pry out the

lock ring is for practical purposes impossible. I can't see anything working except cutting the tire into 3 pieces like I did with the Model AA wheel. Then the outer

sidewall can be driven inwards enough to release the lock ring.

Destroying a 100 year old tire is something I have regrets about, but I will photograph it before I ruin it.

I consider those Firestones to be the best from the teens. Expensive and hard to find these days. All the really great Brass cars seem to use them.

I have a couple but they are the slightly later " E " style. a 1 piece , split band style rim. They interchange directly with the 3 piece ones like yours.

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

The biggest problem is that the tires are literally rock hard.  Squeezing the bead area together to allow the side ring to move inward enough to pry out the

lock ring is for practical purposes impossible. I can't see anything working except cutting the tire into 3 pieces like I did with the Model AA wheel. Then the outer

sidewall can be driven inwards enough to release the lock ring.

Destroying a 100 year old tire is something I have regrets about, but I will photograph it before I ruin it.

I consider those Firestones to be the best from the teens. Expensive and hard to find these days. All the really great Brass cars seem to use them.

I have a couple but they are the slightly later " E " style. a 1 piece , split band style rim. They interchange directly with the 3 piece ones like yours.

Greg


 

Put them out in the sun for three hours........place a pry bar underneath the solid ring and pry down, the snap ring will come out. Lift the solid ring off, and then the fight starts. I’m sure I can get it off......it’s just how much blood and sweat it takes......I have only cut two tires off in my life, and it’s very difficult not to ruin the rim. You could always saws all it through the center.....then place a cutting cable underneath the bead...........it would take about an hour. A high speed Dremel would cut through it carefully.......lots of options, none of them end up with being easy.........

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is all so exciting! I can hardly wait for the driving reports.

One of my best and longest time friends (since high school over fifty years ago!), like you, most of his working life he took care of antique and collector cars for other people. He has worked on and driven hundreds of cars belonging to numerous collectors over the years. (He also has and often tours a half dozen cars of his own!) Some years back (maybe almost fifteen years?), he went to check out a Pierce 66 touring car owned and for sale by another well known collector. He was making recommendations for a potential buyer. He told me that was the only time he ever drove an antique automobile that had so much power that he was almost afraid to get it all the way up to speed! No Stutz, no Mercer, no Pope, no other Pierce, or any racing car, ever affected him that way. He said it was "scary powerful!"

I can hardly wait to hear what you have to say about this car!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, edinmass said:


 

Put them out in the sun for three hours........place a pry bar underneath the solid ring and pry down, the snap ring will come out. Lift the solid ring off, and then the fight starts. I’m sure I can get it off......it’s just how much blood and sweat it takes......I have only cut two tires off in my life, and it’s very difficult not to ruin the rim. You could always saws all it through the center.....then place a cutting cable underneath the bead...........it would take about an hour. A high speed Dremel would cut through it carefully.......lots of options, none of them end up with being easy.........

 

I will certainly give it a try !  I haven't quite got the sun power you have in Florida , I think I better leave it for at least 6 hours and see if that softens the rubber up at all.

Your rims are the best looking ones I have ever seen.  I even have a few smaller but about the same age { late teens } N.O.S. rims that due to sitting around for 100 years 

have worse plating than yours. What a time capsule !

 

Greg

DSC_0039.JPG

DSC_0040.JPG

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed I know you said the tires are new  do you mean ones made in the past few years or new when put on the car years ago but just not used? I am not very good at typing but would like to tell you my experiences about non skid tires.My son and I took the Yellowstone bus about 100 miles through the mountains yesterday and took the 24 cad. and 13 Oakland over 100 miles today. Call me if you get a chance 828 524 6702.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed I know you said the tires are new  do you mean ones made in the past few years or new when put on the car years ago but just not used? I am not very good at typing but would like to tell you my experiences about non skid tires.My son and I took the Yellowstone bus about 100 miles through the mountains yesterday and took the 24 cad. and 13 Oakland over 100 miles today. Call me if you get a chance 828 524 6702.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg.......looks like a challenge. I’m sure I could get it apart.......but it looks like an easy hours work. I take it your trying to save the tire.......even if you don’t cut it off, it will probably suffer significant damage.....even enough to make it no longer good as a wall hanger. Heavy rust inside the rim will be your biggest challenge. The snap ring and flange ring don’t look too difficult to get past, getting the tire off the rim with rust.....and the possibility of the tire shrinking could prove very difficult. You could make a video and post it while removing the tire.........entertainment for all......a real reality show! 👍

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect the tire is about 1920 at the newest. Notice it also has the metric size molded in . Not sure when that feature was dropped  by the tire makers, but probably a long time ago. It would be nice to keep it as a wall hanger but I doubt it will survive.

If we get a nice warm day this week I will give it a try. 2 weeks ago was about the peak of our summer temps. but I was too busy with other things to give it a shot.

Greg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never tried this with brick hard ancient tires. However what I have used to remove windshield glass mounted in steel frames with old rubber ('50s/'60s replacements).Both the glass and the frames were much  more fragile than tires and rims, and because the glass was still good laminated, I REALLY wanted to save it and not have to buy new (it had to be removed because the frame needed torch repair).  For a few days, I carefully dribbled small amounts of gasoline all around the edges of the rubber setting. Not only did I save the glass, and the frame, but even the setting came out in reusable condition (which really didn't matter because I was replacing it with original brass channeling).

It seems to me that gasoline might soften the rust-bound rubber enough to make the job easier. If you were nearby, I would suggest that you bring them by here. I have a nifty bead-breaker left behind by the place's previous owner! (It hooks onto one of the deck supports in front of the garage, but hasn't failed me yet!)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wayne......I would never use gasoline.....that said, brake  fluid will soften rubber easily. In windshield frame applications I have used it several times. Once apart, soak a rag in the fluid and place in the frame channels, and overnight you can easily get all the rubber out without damaging the chrome/stainless. Of course in particular applications........sometimes nothing works. The tire above is going to be difficult at best. Trying to save it will probably be impossible but one never knows till you try. Having the right tools is important, as well as the right attitude...........I have some old carpet I place on the ground about ten foot square to protect tools, the wheel, and myself. Also, in thr photos you can see the one inch thick foam rubber knee pads......also a must for us old guys. 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, edinmass said:

Received an interesting report this morning, that the 1915 Dual Valve White.........which I believe is a prototype or pre production car was out and about yesterday. They finally got it on an open stretch of road and tried the overdrive gear. The speed limit on the road was 45 mph......they got the car up to 55 mph easily and backed off at that point for safety and speed limit reasons......and the car had more to go. The car is a closed car, and the owner is cautious as it is top heavy. Looking forward to setting  the touring car free in overdrive and run it up to maximum speed to see what that is.........and I promise a video when it happens!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which is interesting, because in 1915, or 1917 for your car, there weren't many roads where you could drive 55 or faster for any length of time.

 

Someone asked about the tires, I believe I heard that the run of that size was made in the late 1940's, and the tires on this White are from that run.

 

I assume they're straight sided tires?  My 1910 Buick has three rings, one lock ring, two reversible rings so that you can run either clincher or straight side.

 

Ed, glad you're having so much fun!  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tires are from the Henry Ford batch made after the war......they are still fine.......but old. I had the same set on my 1914 Cadillac and there were no issues. That said, I have decided to run these tires with new tubes for a short time, and then I shall replace them. I don't want to drop 3 grand on tires until I have the car running down the road and fully sorted. With the dual rear spares, changing tires out is easy, just two a week with a swap and that way it isn't all done in a marathon. I will let you know what tires I choose in about two months, and the tires on the car which are still perfectly fine are going to a forum member here who needs them for his car.......as a nice thank you for his advice and friendship. ( Giving back is what the AACA is all about.) If this were a 30 mph car I would keep the ones on it now........I don't intend to drive this car at thirty very much.........so safe is always first consideration.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

If it’s not pre war, I don’t know anything about it.

 

You're going to have to change your signature line, you'll know PLENTY about this prewar car....

 

I like the Goodrich tires, and they seem to be available in the size you need....they don't give them away of course...will be interesting to see what you choose...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

I have never tried this with brick hard ancient tires. However what I have used to remove windshield glass mounted in steel frames with old rubber ('50s/'60s replacements).Both the glass and the frames were much  more fragile than tires and rims, and because the glass was still good laminated, I REALLY wanted to save it and not have to buy new (it had to be removed because the frame needed torch repair).  For a few days, I carefully dribbled small amounts of gasoline all around the edges of the rubber setting. Not only did I save the glass, and the frame, but even the setting came out in reusable condition (which really didn't matter because I was replacing it with original brass channeling).

It seems to me that gasoline might soften the rust-bound rubber enough to make the job easier. If you were nearby, I would suggest that you bring them by here. I have a nifty bead-breaker left behind by the place's previous owner! (It hooks onto one of the deck supports in front of the garage, but hasn't failed me yet!)

Wayne:

 I have a different problem. The glass that was in the bottom fixed frame on my 1925 Buick Master Touring needed new setting tape. It came right out without issue. As did the crumbling setting tape. The assembly seemed to be a bit snug in the between the windshield posts. But the glass was just old plate glass. OH...I better get safety glass in there. The corners on the V shaped bottom corners were cracked from the side pressure of what I assumed to be that the glass was fit too tight. I had taken it to the local glass shop. The owner indicated that the safety glass he had was thicker and that he would set it in black silicon sealing compound as there was no room in the frame for the setting tape. I stripped, cleaned and re-soldered the corners. Using a rubber bungee strap to pull the frame closer to the original fit size. Primed and re-painted. After it was dried for several days I worried the cowl gasket into the bottom channel. With the frame finished and unmarked I took it back to the shop. On my first visit I indicated that though the plate glass was OK as a pattern the overall length had to be at least 1/8" shorter so as not to put pressure on the upright sections of the frame. Please do not try to force the glass! I got it back on Friday. Both corners are cracked again, the frame now fits tight between the posts. (To be at least 1/4" uniform spacing for the side seals.) The glass is even bowed in the frame.

 Not happy about this. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

More progress on the White today........one thousand items down, three thousand more to go. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, and I’m now certain of a good outcome. We have a short term and long term water pump solution. The water pump went from a non issue to a huge issue........all problems are resolved........just time & money and it will be fixed. While not easy, resolving the most difficult issue in less than a week felt good. We are now assembling things, and no longer taking it apart.......more good news. I have the factory carb rebuilt and ready on the shelf. The Zenith will get done tomorrow........we will test both, and run the better unit. My money is in the barrel valve White unit. Have the Stewart Warner vacuum tank apart......will service it and reassemble tomorrow, and I expect no issues with it. Was able to duplicate all the factory fuel lines.........saving some that had need removed by the tractor mechanic back in the early 50’s. Spoke to the magneto rebuilder, should have it back in seven to ten days. The magneto will govern our first start up and drive. Making an oil pressure pot to pre lube the engine, will test it with the pan down to be sure all oil galleries are open and functional, then we will install the pan and prepare for running. Will flush the block tomorrow with the evapo rust system of Matt Harwood’s design. Will make a few slight modifications to fit this car and my fabrication style. We got the gas tank  apart, and removed the fuel sender......it was dirty, nasty, and stuck like you can’t believe. Used my new Snap On Venom inductive heating tool to heat the sending unit......worked FANTASTIC! Came apart easily and without any damage.....a minor miracle. Will chemically clean the tank over the next few days, and seal it if it needs it.....which I don’t think it will. We need to flush the transmission and rear end and install new oil........but we are starting to run out of “big projects” and getting down to small but important details. The leather on the seats and doors continues to clean up remarkably well..........while there are countless hours to go, there is mostly good news in this area. Will need to figure out glass for the windshield soon........and already looking ahead to figuring out addition rear tail and stop lights for safety......they will be magnetic LED’s that have quick connect wiring. We want safety and convenience but not alter the car or it’s original aspects. Overall a positive reawakening that is going much better than one could expect. Starting to get anxious to drive this thing........👍

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 10
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Update:


 

Well another good day. Magneto is all set. It’s the reason the car hasn’t run since the 40’s. Bad coil and condenser. Also a fractured front casting.  When I got the car home I found a NOS American Bosch coil in the factory box from the fifties’. That explains all the “ automobile archaeology“  I have determined. Last run before WWII, after the war in 1952 someone decided to make the car run, but they were never successful. They began to install an electric fuel pump, but never ran the wires. They bought a correct replacement Zenith carburetor, but never hooked it up. They installed new tires with old tubes, several with patches.......that were no longer holding. The vacuum tank was remover in the plan to run a electric fuel pump. The car is twelve volts, and it has a nice NOS Bendix pump installed without the wiring. They probably couldn’t get past the positive ground. I will remove the pump, and install a new Carter priming pump, only because the factory lines have been cut. Had the oil pan and windage tray steam cleaned today, and the pan will go back on tomorrow. Put the fan drive cover back on. Started to look at the wiring, and think we can work with what we have in the short term. Will install a Optima 12 Volt in the car......the owners Manuel says a 75 amp battery.....we WILL exceed that. We are using the Matt Harwood modified Evapo Rust block flushing system with the EDINMASS heater ..........we got the system up to 170 degrees and climbing before we suffered a collapsed intake hose from the heat. Will fix that tomorrow. So the block is flushing at temperature with the liquid gold evapo rust. Seven gallons of it............using the identical pump and heater Matt used. I was able to zoom in on his photo on the Lincoln thread and use the identical components. He is correct, the pump is VERY loud but working fine. I flushed the block with hot water first to get as much crud out as I could, but fortunately it was surprisingly clean, So I expect very good results from the heated power flush. We will do the radiator over the weekend. From the looks of thing we will be running mid to late next week........we WILL do an actual unedited video firing it off for the first time in approximately 75 years. Should be lots of fun. Lots of things coming together and lots of things causing problems.......we will work through them to get this BAD BOY called “Big Dave” going down the road. This thing has been kicking my ass.....and I must admit I’m tired........but this thread made the top posting 14 days in a row here......which I am rather certain is a record.......by quite a bit.......so many people must find it interesting. Thanks to everyone offering help. My best to all......Ed.

365675A7-33BF-42A7-84E3-B44037DD250B.jpeg

A2D11056-0BC6-448D-87EB-5BDF3633DB9E.jpeg

D07CA630-E953-49E1-8847-042031879E35.jpeg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Update:


 

Well another good day. Magneto is all set. It’s the reason the car hasn’t run since the 40’s. Bad coil and condenser. Also a fractured front casting.  When I got the car home I found a NOS American Bosch coil in the factory box from the fifties’. That explains all the “ automobile archaeology“  I have determined. Last run before WWII, after the war in 1952 someone decided to make the car run, but they were never successful. They began to install an electric fuel pump, but never ran the wires. They bought a correct replacement Zenith carburetor, but never hooked it up. They installed new tires with old tubes, several with patches.......that were no longer holding. The vacuum tank was remover in the plan to run a electric fuel pump. The car is twelve volts, and it has a nice NOS Bendix pump installed without the wiring. They probably couldn’t get past the positive ground. I will remove the pump, and install a new Carter priming pump, only because the factory lines have been cut. Had the oil pan and windage tray steam cleaned today, and the pan will go back on tomorrow. Put the fan drive cover back on. Started to look at the wiring, and think we can work with what we have in the short term. Will install a Optima 12 Volt in the car......the owners Manuel says a 75 amp battery.....we WILL exceed that. We are using the Matt Harwood modified Evapo Rust block flushing system with the EDINMASS heater ..........we got the system up to 170 degrees and climbing before we suffered a collapsed intake hose from the heat. Will fix that tomorrow. So the block is flushing at temperature with the liquid gold evapo rust. Seven gallons of it............using the identical pump and heater Matt used. I was able to zoom in on his photo on the Lincoln thread and use the identical components. He is correct, the pump is VERY loud but working fine. I flushed the block with hot water first to get as much crud out as I could, but fortunately it was surprisingly clean, So I expect very good results from the heated power flush. We will do the radiator over the weekend. From the looks of thing we will be running mid to late next week........we WILL do an actual unedited video firing it off for the first time in approximately 75 years. Should be lots of fun. Lots of things coming together and lots of things causing problems.......we will work through them to get this BAD BOY called “Big Dave” going down the road. This thing has been kicking my ass.....and I must admit I’m tired........but this thread made the top posting 14 days in a row here......which zi am rather certain is a record.......by quite a bit.......so many people must find it interesting. Thanks to everyone offering help. My best to all......Ed.

 

 

I like your optimism.  I need to hear that when you are messing with my stuff.

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I like your optimism.  I need to hear that when you are messing with my stuff.

 


 

I can’t help it if my stuff is in better shape than your stuff. The Stearns is scheduled for more work tomorrow night, and a 100 mile drive on Saturday morning. Probably the first hundred mile drive in the last fifty years......we shall see. It will either make it, break down, or blow up........BOOM!  💥 💥 That’s the sucking sound of money going down the drain.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 2
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Neat to look at......who says no one is intrested in Nickel Era cars.......14 days in a row of being the top thread.......my guess is it’s a new first for this site.........

9C24A1FA-A019-4528-9B29-A596E2B00B13.png

55586742-684C-4F4D-A1BC-C0FEF1B18B03.png

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed: any trouble getting a title in PBC ? Up here in Orange can get a tag or license renewal this week but no title appointments untli, the end of September (and nothing without an appointment & must be a local resident).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to convert a duplicate set of headlights and tail light to LED’s or Halogens, does anybody know of a set available. I want to be able to swap back to the stock factory lights for the preservation class. Does anyone have a Donald Axelrod’s email address in New Hampshire? Thanks, Ed.

3FD3E32F-12E6-4A49-88FB-3447DCD544C7.jpeg

F758F67F-A7DC-493A-A072-B0FCEFED8BA8.jpeg

A1C67C3D-A705-4BE0-8DFD-3764F3A7FEC7.jpeg

D7B9F149-44A8-43FE-BDBE-C226CE936B78.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,

 

It seems to me that part of the reason you are tired is because you have spent so much time here posting about the "twin cam"(couldn't resist).  We all appreciate reading the posts though.  I don't think that people are thinking so much about nickel era cars as they are just liking a damn good story.  Hell, you could probably make a pretty good coffee table book and charge lots of money for it.  Just be sure to save a couple of things for me to do.

 

Nickelroadster

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, padgett said:

Ed: any trouble getting a title in PBC ? Up here in Orange can get a tag or license renewal this week but no title appointments untli, the end of September (and nothing without an appointment & must be a local resident).


 

Actually just started looking into it today.......no definitive answer yet. It’s a hard sell to try and title a 1917 car when people are waiting in line for everyday cars. I will probably just insure it and drive it on a YOM plate.......the cops won’t care. As long as there is insurance.The fact the state is shut down is NOT my problem. If I wanted to protest I don’t need a mask and can trash public property......if I want to pay my sales tax and registration fees......I can’t drive my car. I call it bullsxxt. I’m too old to care.....I’ll just drive it.

  • Like 6
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Neat to look at......who says no one is intrested in Nickel Era cars.......14 days in a row of being the top thread.......my guess is it’s a new first for this site.........

 

I suspect I speak for many.......my life has a lot of stress in it......... In the last two weeks some of my more light hearted moments of relaxed stress reduction has been to log on this thread and see what has happened since I last checked.  Each time I enjoy it and learn things.  It occurs to me how busy you are to dig into the various parts of this project and still making time to post for our enjoyment.  Thanks for letting us go along for the ride.  

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, nickelroadster said:

Ed,

 

It seems to me that part of the reason you are tired is because you have spent so much time here posting about the "twin cam"(couldn't resist).  We all appreciate reading the posts though.  I don't think that people are thinking so much about nickel era cars as they are just liking a damn good story.  Hell, you could probably make a pretty good coffee table book and charge lots of money for it.  Just be sure to save a couple of things for me to do.

 

Nickelroadster


 

I figure there is three weeks full time cleaning out grease fittings and lubrication spots......and I am not looking forward to that! Today were were hand cleaning the oil pan......and it took an hour to do an area the size of a dollar bill, my trusty helper looked at me and said........16 hours to clean it right....so we took it to the local truck dealer and put it in his steam clean bay....they did it in a half hour for 40 bucks.......and it saved our sanity and made us more productive to keep pushing forward. When the time  comes to start it for the first time......I will post a day in advance, so the video will be close to real time.........the initial test drive will be from the service garage on my house street to the shop.....five blocks total. With luck, we will get a round trip out of it. The thing is just too big to put on a rollback without hitting the trees. Getting close to the finish line!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, edinmass said:

 Does anyone have a Donald Axelrod’s email address in New Hampshire? Thanks, Ed.

Ed,

 

Have this info from a few years ago, so may not be current.

Headlight headquarters

Email hdlthqtrs@aol.com  

Phone 781-598-0523 

 

EDIT - Sorry for the duplicate posts, Have asked Moderators to remove them.😪

Edited by Ozstatman (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • gwells changed the title to The phone rang... and then the next car adventure starts

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...