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i realize that this car is a rare car, and that it is quite possibly the best all around car that i have ever driven, but what is the chance of this car becoming a true collecter? im not trying to say it wont,or that i dont think it will, because i believe it has a good chance at it, but i am just wondering if anybody has any guesses as to how much this car will go up in value 10 or 20 years from now? the reason i ask is because my reatta is giving me all kinds of problems, and there are many things i would like to fix because i am obsessed with making it the best it can be. If the car wont go up in value, i might just save some money and leave it alone, and buy something else to be obsessed with.

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As one of the generators of the OCW 1-6 rating scale, the time to buy a collector car is when it becomes a collection item and not to be a daily driver until then.

Why ? For one reason that six months of driving is usually enough to drop a car one grade & acouple of years with no maintenance, two.

Keep in mind that while restoration of a grade is relatively simple, the increase in cost (time and money) is exponential. This is why it is so important to fix things as they occur. Additionally if you plan to keep a car that is over 10 years old, it is best to buy two of everything that breaks - one to be a spare for the next time.

My rule of thumb is that most drivers are #4 cars and some with care ane expenditure will be #3. #3s make up the great bulk of cars seen at shows and to anyone but a fanatic they look good.

The next stage is class 2. These are cars that appear new even though they have a few miles on them. The owner has probably spent the value of the purchase over again in restoration using NOS parts. Everything works and is shiny and new appearing, even the catalytic converter. The will win the class in most regional shows and are quite pampered.

Even an owner will not be able to tell a class 2 from a class 1 on the street except that you won't see a class 1 on the street, they come out only for shows and TV spots and are trailered to those. These not only look new, they are new and every component and sticker is in the right place and as it left the factory, even (and especially) the factory defects.

Every component was made in the right plant and on the correct day (or within a narrow range). The air in the tires may not be original but the markings will be correct for the time of manufacture (and the gov keeps changing them).

Years ago I messed with a lot of avid collectors by saying that no '60s GM muscle car ever came with a R-59 Delco battery even though every book showed that number. The reason was that the Delco battery plants shipped the batteries to the car plants pre-filled with acid while the service batteries were shipped dry. Guess what: R-59 was the designation for a dry battery grin.gif This is they type of thing that collectors and judges get into fist fights over since the rating in a Platinum Class at a national show can make many k$$$ difference in the value of a "collector car".

Is part of the reason I stopped judging - at one major event at car that scored very high was one I had taken a close look at. In discussion with the owner I pointed out about 50 points worth of errors - things like silkscreened logos on plug wires when that during that period they were embossed. The owner agreed completely but pointed out that fortunately for him the judging team hadn't noticed.

Am certain that someday points will be deducted for an '88 that has the wrong oil pressure sensor or wrong headlights and the difference will be measured in dollars. I just lost interest years ago.

Major point here is that while a #2 could be made a number one through massive cash and labor infusion, you can't transform a #3 into a number 1 for any same effort and a number 4 just can't without jacking up the radiator cap and sliding a new car under it (has been done but usually to maintain a special vin or history).

For example, I consider that with about a weekend's effort & complete detailing mine could be a mid-3, to be any more would require a complete repaint.

Just for those who must know, my opinion is that the most valuable 20 years from now will be a 91 Convert followed by an early 88 (first 1700ish- mine is late - lower the serial number the better) coupe followed by the 90 convert, followed by 91, 89, & 90 coupes. Today the 88 Coupe is probably the cheapest to buy. My opinion.

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just some thoughts on the subject...traditionally, cars that become collectible were never very desirable when they were new, and the Reatta would be in this group. most people did not go to a Buick dealer to look for a two-seat sports/luxury car, and Reattas usually sat around for a while before they were sold. this same thing also happened with other cars, like the Shelby Mustangs, which many times sat for so long, they were re-titled as the next year's model. I can still remember when the Shelbys were new (I'm that old), and can still hear people saying "its just a Mustang!" a lot more people now are bowing at the Shelby altar than when these cars were new!

cars that will take much longer to become collectible would include all the cars that everyone told you "would be really collectible", like the Grand National, the '76 Eldorado convertible, or any Trans AM. it becomes very difficult for any car to increase in value when the are 2,000 others available that are "still in wrapper", and no miles.

enter the lowly Reatta, with dirt-cheap parts prices, (an Allante hood is $4000-6000) and production of just over 21,000 units, and a bulletproof drivetrain. now that many cars some thought looked like the Reatta ( a Skyhawk with hidden headlights, Mercury Capri) are long gone to the boneyard in the sky, many more people are noticing the Reatta. not many days pass for me (and I'm sure most of you) that I don't get constant compliments on my Reatta. and these are'nt all from kids, but many times from people who are driving cars that are far more expensive that the Reatta ever was.

getting back to value: a car is worth what it brings, and this is most apparent at a stellar collector-car auction, not e-bay. there are two Reattas that are in the process of being registered at the Barrett-Jackson auction, in Scottsdale, Arizona. the auction is January 15-19, and will be simucast on SPEEDVISION. for those of you not familiar with Barrett-Jackson, it is the pre-eminent collector-car auction in the world, with sales averaging over 87%. you might want to check with their web site, barrettjackson.com, within the next week to see exactly when the Reattas will be on the block, and watch the auction from the comfort of your living room.

Mike

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> what is the chance of this car becoming a true collecter? </div></div>

Slight. Most people don't even know what a Reatta is. Obscure cars are obscure for a reason (nobody cares) and don't usually blossom into a collectable sometime down the road. Plus, they are front wheel drive - I know of no FWD car that is a collectable. Plus, they are not rare - 20,000 is not rare.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> i am just wondering if anybody has any guesses as to how much this car will go up in value 10 or 20 years from now? </div></div>

This is not a guess... way less than what that same investment would increase in almost any stock or bond mutual fund. Probably way less than any CD or even passbook savings account.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> If the car wont go up in value, i might just save some money and leave it alone, and buy something else to be obsessed with. </div></div>

That is an excellent idea if potential price appreciation is the only reason you would want to keep it.

Mike

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I seem to struggle occasionally with the same question, but then I realize that most of the cars I like are not going to appreciate that much in value. And who really knows what the market will be like many years from now. Just for kicks, ask someone in the know about what has happend to the valuelof the A Model Ford over the last twenty years.

I believe the key is in your comment about the Reatta being one of the nicest cars to drive or something to that effect. That being true, and you would rather drive your Reatta than a Toyota Camary, why not spend whatever to keep it on the road and in nice presentable condition. I'll bet no matter how hard parts might be to find, how expensive they may be, that if you do some of the work yourself, you will invest far less in your "ride" than if you bought that Camary that no one ever compliments you on.

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My two cents worth.......

Someday all cars (and other things) become collectable, from the standpoint of the demand surpasses the supply. I am probably saying the same as the rest of you in a different way. I think Mike said if they were not popular when new they would not have as great a collectability. That is kind of the same thing but some cars were did not sell a lot because they were limited and expensive when new. That does not mean they were not desireable then or now.

Also some cars were increadably ugly when new and that will never change, except some will say they are rare, hence collectable.

Of course there is a big difference between collectable and classic.

Don't buy a Reatta because you think it will make you money in the future. Buy it because you like it and if you should make a $$ or two in the future, you will kick yourself for not buying more.

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When I bought my 88, collectibility was not a concern or even entered my mind. I bought it because I fell in love with the car when it first came out. Couldn't afford it brand new and when I could afford it, it took a long time to find what I wanted. I acquired an early model with the suede trimmed seats and reasonably low mileage. If it does become a collector I will just consider that a bonus. smile.gif

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My opinion is that it is a car. it is what u make it. if u spend money on something u like than who cares what others think. for all the people out there who cart there cars around to show them off here is my opinion of you. a car is ment to drive. heck i could put a nice car on a trailer and say it has a big block in it when it only has a 4 banger. as women say "if u got it flont it". this goes for cars 2.

I would rather see thies cars on the road and see them go buy under there own POWER and not on a trailer. i have seen many nice cars and have talked to many a drivers of nice cars. (this does not include mustangs) ofcorse there are aceptions to the rules. i have also heard from spectators at car shows "i have a nicer car than that" and my only reply is "Where is it"? most reply "At home, i don't want to get it dirty." Whats the point? if you are scared to drive the car sell it to someone who will. cars are ment to drive not to sit in a garage for 11 months of the year and only leave in tow of a FORD. sorry if i steped on any toes but when people ask me why i drive a nice car all year round or make comments that arn't justifyed i get a little pissed. CARS ARE MENT TO DRIVE. So drive them. i know im newer but my opinion is as good as the rest. so if u like to tow your car thats good. i will contine to fix my car up and make it well known that im not scared to trade paint or crack a rim. i will contine to drive my reatta till it doesn't make it out of the driveway.

thank u for letting me vent.

new member GOMER

Did i hurt your feelings?

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Didn't hurt my feelings at all. However, I do differ a bit in my thinking in that I don't believe in making a daily driver of a car that has the rarity of the Reatta. That's not to say I don't drive it, I just don't drive it for other than special occasions. We have other rigs for daily use. My wife and I call the Reatta our 'date' car. Having had two minor mishaps with it already I learned the value of minimizing the hazards it gets exposed to. VERY hard to find replacements parts. Discovery of this forum was result of last trauma (idiot side swiped us attempting to pass in a no passing zone). We intend to have and enjoy this car till the time comes to push up daisies. To me it only makes sense to protect as much as possible a special car like the Reatta. grin.gif

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  • 2 weeks later...

I purchased my Reatta Coupe to drive and show. I really enjoy driving it; however, showing the car is something else especially if BCA/Reatta Club members are the judges-----ie: dirt on muffler, x-points deducted--July 2002--Kokomo, IN. How does a judge know that the dirt did not get on the muffler while being loaded on the truck at the Flint plant. I like my Reatta, but I really like my Tucker and I'm not afraid to move it in the mud!! I and my cars do not live in a "GLASS" house!!

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The answer is that at a show you mark it "For display only, not to be judged." Have done that with my cars before (and have had several the production was in single or double digits).

One time I got so tired about being ribbed about one of my cars that I hosted a contest (with a nice prize) for the person who could come closest to all of the "wrong" things about it. No-one got more than half.

The funny thing was that every time I tried to point out the absurdity of trying to create a "100 point" car even just ten years after production people thought I was pushing for stricter judging. - Have never seen a "platinum" car that someone who really knew could not find at least enough points to drop to gold if not silver.

One time someone who had gone to great expense to outfit a 67 Goat with hood tach, guages, and clock got quite irate even after I pointed out that the clock should have been in the fourth pod to the right and not the third since the factory had built a speedo-guage combo but not a speedo-clock for the center two.

Must admit that a Reatta with only two or three options available & all listed in the trunk, would be one of the easier cars to judge but why ?

Personally really got tired of picking nice cars apart.

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  • 3 years later...

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I can still remember when the Shelbys were new (I'm that old), and can still hear people saying "its just a Mustang!" </div></div>

It IS just a Mustang!

With special trim and drivetrain package, not a LINE of cars, merely an "Optional Package", like a GN or GNX.

And with more than 200 sold, not as rare as a 91 Reatta convertible.

Yet, more widely desired, due to movie appearances with big-name actors.

Only 1990 Reatta convertibles have been shown or sold at Barret-Jackson, and only 4 of them so far.

No 1991 Reatta convertibles have hit the auction block at a B-J event, YET.

See attachment -

1991 Black/Flame red Reatta convertible, 29,000 miles, GOLD award winner midwest BCA 2005.

post-38921-143137860668_thumb.jpg

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Listen collectable or not I am still going drive mine for two reasons. first its fun to drive, (nothing like flying down the highway to and from work in it)

second it looks great.

Plus is something is limeted like the reatta is, when the numbers get diminshed the value should inherantly go up. so then would the people that drive there reattas all the time (with the availability of numerous things to cause the car to be used no more) make the non-driven reattae increase in value?

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Reatta convertible values are going up as we speak, whether or not they're driven. Thier CPI values rose 8% in the last 4 months of 2005.

Of course, the least-driven cars will command a higher value than those with high miles, that would be true for any collectible car, or any car, for that matter.

As with any limited-production line of cars, value of the remaining few with low odometer readings will increase exponentially, as the number of cars available decreases, and the popular desire to own such a car expands the market for them.

Not to worry, like other desireable collectible cars, there will always be enthusiasts who are willing to deal with them. Picture, if you will, the young man in his rough condition collectible car, the fifth, (or 12th), owner. He works on it every weekend, and sometimes "en route", just to keep it on the road, because he LOVES to drive HIS too-cool car. He spends time in boneyards, on eBay and at forums, searching for parts and technical information for HIS glorious ride. He can rebuild it, make it better! Like Lee Austin, the six-million dollar man. It's not just a car to him, it's a conquest, an affair, or maybe a life long commitment.

He will make this car the best he can afford.

Or, the enthusiast who cannot fix his own car, you may not find him in the boneyard often, or at all. He probably does similar research, finding the best car he can, then he uses his resources to pay others to "pimp his ride" to his specifications. He may even draw from his future resources to accomplish this, considering it as a better investment, which he can enjoy as it appreciates in value, always being able to recoup his investment, or realize a profit at a later date.

He will buy the best car he can afford, to avoid the expense of rebuilding it.

Both of these buyers have the same level of motivation to own a collectible car as the collector or investor, (who can afford to buy a low-mile show car), just at different scales of economy. All three may end up spending similar portions of thier incomes to own such a car. The advantage goes to the one who is ready to spend the most to get the best car available. You may, or may not find this guy in a boneyard, or a forum, or even eBay-style venues. Some only goto high-end auctions, where the "cream of the crop" are believed to be. Some goto car shows, for the same reason. They see the auction, or show, as thier "car lot", where they choose the car they like best, and buy it.

He will get the best car money, (of which he has plenty!), can buy.

So, collectible cars will always have interested buyers at all price and condition levels. The fewer cars available to each market level will command a higher price, as long as desire/popularity does not decrease.

There are plenty of CRAPPY cars out there, which are considered desireable, collectible, or rare. Desire for quality, unique style, comfort, driveability, reliability and serviceability will keep cars like Reatta at the higher value rangethan others of thier era.

Reattae are gaining popularity rapidly, as is evident by the numbers of posts here, the most of any discussion at this AACA site, and the recent rise in CPI values. Major automotive publications have also recognized the Reatta line's appeal. Hemmings lists it among the most desireable of the late model/future collectible cars to watch, and Collectible Automobile features it in the Feb. issue on newsstands now.

More and more people are discovering the timeless style, comfort, reliability and servicability of the Reatta, yet they are'nt makin' any more cars!

Less than 25,000 Reattae ever hit the road, or enough cars for,(approximately), .01%(.0001) of the US population, or 1 car per 10,000 citizens. Of these, less than 2,500 were concertibles, enough for .001%(.00001) of the US population, or 1 per 100,000 citizens. Actual production numbers were lower than those used in this example, so Reatta-to-buyer ratios are higher than depicted.

Rise in equity does not always equal return on investment, however. There must be buyers in the market(level) which the value/condition of the car is recognized, who will buy at that price. And that market narrows as the price/value increases.

For more on this subject, see this thread-

http://forums.aaca.org/showflat.php?Cat=&Number=161911&page=0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=&fpart=1

For a photo of a 1991 Reatta convertible-see attachment of BCA Gold award winner

post-38921-143137860683_thumb.jpg

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<span style="font-weight: bold">Not to worry, like other desireable collectible cars, there will always be enthusiasts who are willing to deal with them. Picture, if you will, the young man in his rough condition collectible car, the fifth, (or 12th), owner. He works on it every weekend, and sometimes "en route", just to keep it on the road, because he LOVES to drive HIS too-cool car. He spends time in boneyards, on eBay and at forums, searching for parts and technical information for HIS glorious ride. He can rebuild it, make it better! Like Lee Austin, the six-million dollar man. It's not just a car to him, it's a conquest, an affair, or maybe a life long commitment.

He will make this car the best he can afford.</span>

My life story grin.gif

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At a meeting of Chicagoland BCA early this winter, one of the members looked at my car and commented "I really like Reattas but all of the ones that I look at have so many miles". The Reatta is the most recent of a group of cars that I use because I drive a company car, and don't feel I should use it for myself. I find it interesting that I have always insured them for limited use, say 5K per year. The thing about the Reatta is that it is fun to drive, and comfortable, and compared to my "rash of Triumphs" relatively trouble free. I find myself unable to keep to that 5K per year figure, and will have to up it just because I'd rather drive it than any of my Accords. I just feel that they are too much fun to drive to trailer of keep stored. Because I'm 59, I also figure, why save it?

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Check out this listing on eBay 1990 droptop "NEVER TITLED" 7,000 miles at a dealership in Fairmont WV. This would be your next best thing to new. the listing is item # 4612120486 has 9 days left with a Buy It Now of $25,000 seams like a lot for a '90 but how many like this are around. I guess not many and not a lot for sale and if so not on eBay. But, some of the things I see on eBay surprise me and I've seen a lot in my 58 years well it seems like it to me anyway. I guess we will see what this one is worth. It started at $100.00 this morning and has hit $9,600 with 18 bids so far.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> At a meeting of Chicagoland BCA early this winter, one of the members looked at my car and commented "I really like Reattas but all of the ones that I look at have so many miles". </div></div>

They just keep going and going.........

7 of my 10 Reattae have 100k+ miles on them. Only 1 does not run and drive.

115k, 133k, 155k, 161k, 181k and a 281k '89 coupe, my most recent acquisition.

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The description was'nt intended to point you out, F14. Most enthusiasts fit into this category, including me, I've been there many times in my past, as many of us have.

Are you going to try to incorporate a touch screen to your in-car PC setup?

I've considered a tablet computer to accomplish this, they come in all sizes.

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Hey Randy I have been hashing over your comments way back when you posted your FOR SALE ad about 6 months ago for your higher mileage coupes (and converts) wherein you stated that if no one purchased that was OK because you would be RESTORING a Reatta or two over the winter and could use parts.

That is the part of collecting these cars that will become crucial in the next ten years and few (if any) are doing so. We know the number of total Reatta made (we have production numbers) and we alwys hear of Reattae biting the dust and being scrapped out.

This is the very essence of collectibility in that people collect objects of our desire that are not readily available. It doesn't have to be cars, it can be anything but part 2 is that these items of value almost always deteriorate requiring attention and restoration, which some like to do and more do not.

Those that don't - try to buy low mileage originals and preserve them by not overly driving them, and that's OK but restoration and some collecting of parts cars will be necessary to grow the Reatta hobby in my opinion.

So Kudo's to you for what you do and keep learning how to restore them and share your knowledge with others. A worn out malfunctioning Reatta can get a person down in a hurry but they can be restored. A 3.8 V6 can be rebuilt, the transmission can be rebuilt, wiring harnesses repaired, electronics can be fixed but it is a higher effort task then a 60 year old car. On the other hand, 60 year old Buicks pose certain issues not relevant to a Reatta restoration, such as cost of chrome restoration ($$$$) and hard to find parts, huge bodies that need painting as opposed to the manageable Reatta, etc.

Just some thoughts. Your comment about RESTORING Reattae really caught my attention.

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Here we go........I collected Corvettes for years.......way back to 1967 and I still own my first Corvette (1967 Conv't).......we all know what happen to Corvette prices. But of course, Reatta's aren't Corettes but........ I own one, 1988 Reatta Coupe. You guys mentioned all the good things like where can you get a neat 2 seater for about $5,000 or less? Fun to drive and own and can take on trips. Ever drive a old 60's Vette or any GM product from that time. They sit in the garage because your afaid someone will steal, hurt or damage the car. So I think Reattas MUST go up in value very soon within 5 years because of the low volume and the looks and pleasure to drive. You see, the car is not yet 20 years old...and alot of people have never seen the car.....who has seen a 1967 Corvette lately? One person said because people have not seen it has no value.....but with more poeple showing the cars at little shows this draws attention. We have a weekend summer show and one guy brings his Reatta and its a rag but people wonder what the H is that? Buick made a what? When? How much are these things? WOW.......Ever see what people pay for Cobalt's now?

Listen people.....try to collect Corvette? Reatta's are a bargain......but don't wait too long....because low mileage under 100k are getting harder to get at those low prices........

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> So Kudo's to you for what you do and keep learning how to restore them and share your knowledge with others. A worn out malfunctioning Reatta can get a person down in a hurry but they can be restored. </div></div>

Thanx 4'd kind words, 3Jakes!!! Glad to hear someone's reading my "Cull the Herd" thread.

Here's the link- http://forums.aaca.org/showflat.php?Cat=&Number=319377&page=0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=&fpart=1

I'm currently in the shop with 2- '89 & 1- '88 working on thier resto projects.

Found a process which will retrieve a fender in under 5 minutes! I will share info & photos when compiled.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> But of course, Reatta's aren't Corettes but........ I own one, 1988 Reatta Coupe. You guys mentioned all the good things like where can you get a neat 2 seater for about $5,000 or less? </div></div>

Hey, I resemble that remark wwollet! I've been collecting Reattae for years, and even have one '84 C4 Twin TBI Corvette, and LOVE it. The car performs like it has twin 4-bbl carbs, and flat smoked a Z06, (.4 sec @ 60Ft. timers), at the local dragstrip, (The Legendary Great Lakes Dragaway, Union Grove, WI), Where my daughter(s) run the front gate. Yeah I get to race for FREE, but only ran the Vette once, like to walk away a winner. Sure I'd prefer a '53, '63, '69 or '72, maybe even a '91 Vette, but as you said-

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Listen people.....try to collect Corvette? Reatta's are a bargain......but don't wait too long....because low mileage under 100k are getting harder to get at those low prices........ </div></div>

Most Vettes are priced in the "Untouchable" range. Reatta is a fine automobile, produced in very limited numbers, which is comfortable to drive anywhere, and for long periods of time. I could'nt drive my Vette to Chicago from here (1 hour) without a chiropractor handy at trips' end. The roads up here are not well suited to "performance" suspension, and can cause an otherwise nice Vette to knock 'yer back teeth loose. I'm sure Vettes get driven more south of the Mason-Dixon line, where the roads are smooth and it does'nt snow. Mine sits in the garage for MOST of the year, partially due to the fact I'm driving a Reatta, or two.

I love my Vette, but if it sells, I'll buy another Reatta, or two, with the proceeds.

See attachment.

post-38921-143137860698_thumb.jpg

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Yes....I think we are saying the same thing about Corvettes and Reattas. My main point is that the orginal post asked about Reattas being collectable and how they stack up to the rest......... all I am saying is there are some good values left but not for long........In todays world $5,000 doesn't buy a whole lot of car anymore.

As far as speed goes.......not all people care about how fast your cars go. We all know that anything orginal is worth much more than something modified. For example, many Corvettes over the years have been altered like engine swaps or mods and paint changes, and they will NEVER be worth the orginal.....this would hold true for Reattas....but again each to their own on what they like... and what they want to spend THEIR money on.........

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Yes one of the oddities is that a car with the original defects is woth more to a collector than one that has been through a recall.

My feeling is that the Reatta suits me and my current driving better than the other three contemporary GM two seaters - Covette, Allante, Fiero. Fact is that the market really only supports one and the domestics demographics fit the Corvette best, people wanting luxury two seaters buy Mercedes.

Part of the issue is that the "sports car" niche has changed drastically since the 60's when just about every manufacturer had one. For one thing, there are not that many reasons to travel on twisty roads any more and even less need for passing ability.

Second, the people who can use a two seat car usally have others for when more is needed. Third, the comfolt level of the average sedan has increased dramatically since the 60s - a/c, six speaker stereo, power everything are now expected instead of optional.

Finally, the ability of domestic car companies to manufacture a small, inexpensive car at a profit has disappeared so you can have a small expensive car or a large expensive car (why the Solstice claims a base of $20k but in reality is the other side of $25k delivered with any options and the Saturn Sky is more, the same price as a Buick Lucerne)

So today the small market is well filled by the Mazda Miata and there is a big jump (mostly in price) to anything else.

There are still some inexpensive ways to have a small, topless car (why I bought a Corvair but only after I failed to find a convertible Fiero) but they are disappearing.

In any event, the Reatta suits me for what I wanted but didn't suit enough people to make is viable.

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  • 2 weeks later...

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Yes one of the oddities is that a car with the original defects is woth more to a collector than one that has been through a recall.

</div></div>

You mean, like the way one can SEE the fiberglas fabric's texture right thru the paint on a '53 Vette?

Or, the little "simley" shaped defect on ALL '67 camaro passenger doors, near the top leading edge?

What about an early Pinto, without the "explosion-preventing" fuel filler neck?

Are they worth more than one "less likely" to explode upon rear-end collisions?

Can one expect more money for an Explorer, with original Firestone tires?

I wish we had'nt fixed the piston-scuffing in the '74 Mustang II, that had to hurt it's value! We ended up scrapping that one, due to lack of interest.

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  • 4 months later...

Collectors cars are funny. I am new to the Reatta Family. However, my other car is a 1980 Triumph TR8. Only 2250 were produced, and out of those 250 were coupes. Mine has 17000 miles on it and so far the TR8 still hasnt taken off as a collectors car. So who knows what anyone will consider a collectors item 20 years from now.

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My 2 cents worth on collector cars.

I have never understood why some people are willing to pay way too much for a #1 or #2 car. Nor can I comprehend why the values are placed so high. For me, I have owned many cars, mostly #4 or lower most likely, but since I have them to enjoy and drive, who cares about perfection in them?

I am one of the only poeple I have ever known to go to car shows in my old cars and give rides to kids. Every time I do so, I am the star of the show, plus I get true satisfaction from the smiles on faces of people from 3 years to 95 years old. A couple years ago, I gave a 96 year old Lady a ride in my '25 Dodge Brothers. She was overjoyed and led in to a story how it was literally the earliest and nicest car she had ever riden in. She explained that it wasn't until the mid '30 that cars were ever seen in the area where she lived and she was never able to ride in those for years to come.

Stories like that are the true value of cars to me. What is a collector car? What ever car creates excitement in the owner or the viewing public would be my answer.

Now a bit off course, but one car I am keeping is a 1960 Kingwood Station Wagon. The book "Sixty Years of Cheverolet" by George Daman states that only 9 of those were ever produced. Anybody willing to guess on a monetary value for this #4 car?

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