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ABS, common burned fuse box and high cost of accumulator.


JSL
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Dear New Friends,

 

Has any one tried to increase the diameter of the wire for the abs pump to allow for the constant draw from the pump to keep the vacuum up to spec ?

 

In order to avoid the common melted fuse box situation.

 

Since it appears to me that the T/C breaks as needed, with a weak accumulator,

and the real issue seams to be a wiring that did not account for a constant draw from the pump in order to do so.

 

I am asking since i think the price for a new accumulator is ridiculous compared to a few $$$ for some wire.

 

Let me know you thought, of course i discovered that half the fuse was melted a way and some of the fuse box

on my new T/C

 

 

About my self i am a new driver 50 miles on Black V 6 at 101566 miles on the Eastern Shore.

 

 

 

 

IMAG2978[1].jpg

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The other thing to consider here isn't just the wire gauge. It's the motor itself. It's not designed for constant running and will most likely overheat, especially if it is under constant load trying to keep the accumulator full. 30 amps continuous pull on a 12V system is pretty significant.

 

Before I would go through the trouble of upgrading the wire size, I'd rip the Teves out and do a vacuum brake conversion. Much easier, solves the problem forever.

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13 hours ago, JSL said:

Dear New Friends,

 

Has any one tried to increase the diameter of the wire for the abs pump to allow for the constant draw from the pump to keep the vacuum up to spec ?

 

In order to avoid the common melted fuse box situation.

 

Since it appears to me that the T/C breaks as needed, with a weak accumulator,

and the real issue seams to be a wiring that did not account for a constant draw from the pump in order to do so.

 

I am asking since i think the price for a new accumulator is ridiculous compared to a few $$$ for some wire.

 

Let me know you thought, of course i discovered that half the fuse was melted a way and some of the fuse box

on my new T/C

 

 

About my self i am a new driver 50 miles on Black V 6 at 101566 miles on the Eastern Shore.

 

 

 

 

 

Try this link  https://www.allpar.com/fix/brakes/tc-brake-booster-replacement.html

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You may find this interesting, I clicked on the link I have put up, the one on converting to conventional brake system, I got the photo of the master cylinder which reminded me that I needed to order one. The one I installed some 20 years ago has developed the common problem they experience. So I went to RockAuto and ordered a new one. 
if you contemplate a conversion, you should do likewise soon, they are becoming extinct too. You need one for 4 wheel disc brakes! 

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I would be reluctant to buy the one as you can read on the unit that it is 1000 PSI.  I would bet that if you could read the marking on the other you would see that it also is 1000 PSI.. I you look at your factory accumulator you will see it read 2000 PSI.

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59 minutes ago, JSL said:

OK I guess I order one, DON'T

Which one should I go for? NEITHER

 

And BTW if the fuse melts is it for sure the accumulator? 

 

 

 

IF THE FUSE AND FUSEHOLDER BURNS/MELTS, it means that the pump is running much too frequently, like every time you step on the brake pedal AND that the pump may even be going BAD. What you absolutely need is a NEW Accumulator. The correct one for this car. OR you can convert the system. Sooner or later, almost everyone who wishes to continue driving these cars will have to convert. It is the ultimate "Fix".

5D9E1779-DEC2-43FD-A736-85B1F3CBC01D.thumb.jpeg.8448e4ca6bb89bbfbd95b4a99ffa2bb4.jpeg

 

 

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I used the one in the first link. It's a Wabco accumulator. Worked perfectly and my pump no longer runs as frequently as it did. Before replacing the pump would run for 30 seconds every time I started the car, even after short trips, now it will really only run for 30 seconds after it's been sitting for a week or two. My 91 only had 46,000 actual miles but it was the original accumulator which only is only really designed to last 10 years. The pump running too much can be the accumulator as mentioned above, or possibly a pressure switch. Parts are still available for the Teves system, but hard to find and usually very pricey. Hemi's solution is a proven way to completely eliminate this ABS system for less than a 1/4 of what it would cost to have your Teves unit rebuilt. Another advantage of converting to a non-abs system is you can convert the rear brake calipers which seem to be unobtainable to more common rear disc brakes shared with many Chrysler products from this era (Lebaron, Daytona, Spirit...etc) which uses a separate parking brake mechanism, inside the brake rotor. 

Edited by Matthew Cody (see edit history)
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Thanks all together - great help,

But falls alarm from me...  What actually happens and I can't even believe still works to break the car.

After looking again wondering why I loose brake fluit I discovered that the link between the master and pump/motor assembly.

Is just sitting on each other spraieng a light mist of break fluid 😱

No wonder the pump keeps working.

Looking at the supposed connection it feels like there is a part missing !?

 

Could someone post a picture how the link suppose to look,  this really puzzles me. 

 

No question my t/c is grounded for now.

 

Any fix for this?  

 

I can separate the two with my finger,  don't think anything is holding them together nor do the parts seam to match.

 

 

IMAG3141.jpg

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  • 10 months later...

Hose looks ok but I think you are right and it's the cause, any write up here how to replace the hose build yourself or a fitting part, I got it out finally but don't find anything like it online. But the make your own banjo parts. 

 

You talk about this one right ?

16250998737618337755714523206437.jpg

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JSL, you ought to learn how to spell. Don’t they teach that in grade school these days, oh I forgot, we are learning other things instead of reading, writing and arithmetic.

Another thing, in order to stop your car, you don’t  ‘break’ the car, you apply the brake.

And to think you got this 4th grade lesson from an IMMIGRANT.

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Dude inappropriate, if you have nothing productive to say keep it to your self.

 

I am looking for car repair tips not grammar mistakes , you can keep those if you find any.

 

You last sentence makes no sense as well , even a immigrant like me sees that.

 

 

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14 hours ago, JSL said:

Hose looks ok but I think you are right and it's the cause, any write up here how to replace the hose build yourself or a fitting part, I got it out finally but don't find anything like it online. But the make your own banjo parts. 

 

You talk about this one right ?

 

Your best chance at finding this hose is ArizonaParts.com or TCParts.com . Back on July 30, 2020 your question was first brought up about the wiring used on these cars. I understand that you have a problem with these brakes and now it appears to be hydraulic. You would likely be best served by replacing your entire assembly with a Reconditioned / Remanufactured one from either one of the 2 available through the links above.

I would further recommend that you have a professional, knowledgeable person or facility replace the assembly for you. You are dealing with your safety and the safety of others and mistakes here could be costly both to you and to others.

I realize the cost of a replacement would be hard on your wallet, however that is the price you must pay to own this 30 year old car equipped with one of the earliest ABS brake systems. All of us who drive one of these cars will find that out sooner or later.

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I would NOT try to build that hose myself. I'm not even sure I would trust a brake hose that would "fit" simply because of where it is in the system. What Hemi suggested is probably the best bet, honestly. 

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The Teves ABS master cylinder on early '88 model Reattas had a hose to supply pressure from the pump. Later '88, '89, '90 and '91 models had a steel line instead of a hose.  Did all the TCs use a hose to connect the pump to the master cylinder?

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3 hours ago, Ronnie said:

The Teves ABS master cylinder on early '88 model Reattas had a hose to supply pressure from the pump. Later '88, '89, '90 and '91 models had a steel line instead of a hose.  Did all the TCs use a hose to connect the pump to the master cylinder?

Yes they did.

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I've only heard of a couple of the hoses on the Reatta master cylinders going bad. Probably because not many of the Teves units with a hose were used on the Reatta. Early '88 models had a hose, later model Reattas had a steel line instead of a hose. The hose can't be replaced with a steel line off a latter model Teves. The fittings are completely different as can be seen in the photos below.  The complete Teves unit with a steel line can be used to replace the ones with a hose if you can find one. Parts for the Teves ABS are getting really hard to find.

 

I think changing over to a vacuum brake system is the way to go although only a handful of Reatta owners have done it. Hemi has done a great job of figuring out what has been done to put vacuum brakes on a TC and I think most of it would apply to a Reatta. A Reatta used basically the same Teves MKII brake system as used on a TC.

 

Early 88 model Teves-2.jpg

 

brake pump-1.jpg

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