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I have a 27 dodge with solid disc wheels. Trying to figure out where to get tires replaced so that rims are not damaged in the process.  Where is the best place to buy tires? I live in Sacramento

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You are going to have to purchase the tires from one of the antique tire specialty company's.  Try Coker Tire,  Universal Tire  or Lucas Tire.  You will then have to have the tires mounted near you.  

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4 minutes ago, ILIKECARS53 said:

You are going to have to purchase the tires from one of the antique tire specialty company's.  Try Coker Tire,  Universal Tire  or Lucas Tire.  You will then have to have the tires mounted near you.  

My ‘26 Dodge Brothers has disc wheels and Lucas tires. They were put on before I bought it in 2017. I like them a lot. Not sure what tire shop would handle them. I’m not looking forward to finding one when I need new ones.

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6 minutes ago, DB26 said:

So that rim spreader works on the solid discs too? I was under the impression the were incompatible. 

No, that tool will not work on those.

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keiser31 Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile and my '26 Studebaker had solid disc wheels but still had the demountable split rims and my friend had a '28 Studebaker with solid disc wheels and three piece rims, was Dodge different?  Is it a drop center?  Maybe an old guy can still learn something every day.

 

Brock if keiser31 is correct and I suspect he is then I am wrong I apologize for butting in on your thread.

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)
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46 minutes ago, Brock Hinton said:

so if the rim spreader wont work does anyone have another idea?

Take the new and old to the tire shop and let them demount the old, and remount the new ones.

 

If you can find an owners manual the tire changing info should be in it.

Edited by JFranklin (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Tinindian said:

keiser31 Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile and my '26 Studebaker had solid disc wheels but still had the demountable split rims and my friend had a '28 Studebaker with solid disc wheels and three piece rims, was Dodge different?  Is it a drop center?  Maybe an old guy can still learn something every day.

 

Brock if keiser31 is correct and I suspect he is then I am wrong I apologize for butting in on your thread.

I could be wrong. Maybe a good closeup photo or two of the wheel in question would be helpful.

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Disc wheels are easy-peasy. You need something to break the bead like a normal wheel. Then take a big screw driver and pop off the snap ring. The tire falls off. Clean ALL the rust out of the groove where the ring fits and reinstall, maybe a wire brush. Turn the ring away from you and fill slowly. No big deal. I just did one Friday. 

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7 hours ago, keiser31 said:

This 1927 has a lock ring style disc wheel....

1927 DB lock ring wheel (2).jpeg

I looked at that and thought Gee that’s identical to the old colour of my dodge. Hahaha. Pretty sure it had Lucas tyres on it. I sold the lot with hubs for $400

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"Dodge Brother Brock" in Sacramento,

 

I won't get into whether a Rim-Spreader WILL or WILL-NOT work on Disk Wheels.

 

However, if the Forum consensus is that a Rim Spreader WILL work, then I would be happy to loan one to you for the Tire Change.

 

I'm located in Sonora, California - About 100 - 125 Miles Southeast of Sacramento. I could deliver it or mail / ship it to you  

 

If you need it? - It's yours to borrow!!

 

Stay Well & Best Regards,

Power Wagon Dude

(209) 533-3663 (Leave Message)

donncharles1@gmail.com

D-B Service Tools 004.JPG

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  • 2 weeks later...

Power wagon Dude  - Thanks. That is very kind of you to offer the use of you rim spreader .  I’m pretty sure it won’t work on my wheels. The inside of the rim looks like one solid piece  I’m thinking it must be the snap ring type but still not clear how to remove it. My wheels have a piece of chromE  going around the edge. Is the snap ring underneath it?  What’s the trick for removing the chrome?

9AE0AF83-F099-48E4-A3E9-96B115909A0F.jpeg

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If you don’t know how to remove the ring, it’s too dangerous for you to do your own tire work. Improperly installed, it can and will kill you.......literally. Get help from a car club member. It’s easy to damage the snap ring, and scratch the hell out of the rim. Crome rings are very prone to cracking. Do yourself a favor, get competent help. 

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What Ed said, especially with the rings having been chromed! Embrittlement can be a serious issue after plating. Another thing to carefully examine is the bottom groove and the flange that the ring fits into. I have seen the results of them failing from rust/thinning during inflation or while under way. There’s a reason that they put truck wheels in a safety cage when inflating these things. If you’re not experienced with them find someone that is to help you, at least for your first time. Don’t know where you’re at but if you are near So. Central PA you can PM me and i’ll give you a hand. We speak DB at my shop. Good luck. Just finished putting this together today for my 1925 DB Roadster.

C362B530-38DE-49C8-A467-64CE14A14854.jpeg

Edited by franklinman (see edit history)
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In your picture you can see the split, one side with a notch. You need to break the bead just like a normal tire, both front and rear. Take the core out of the tube first. Then with a tire iron or large screwdriver  pry the ring loose by putting the iron into the notched side and prying against the rim. Stick a small chip of wood or smaller screwdriver into the gap of the ring when you get it loose and move to another area to get the rest loose. When you take the tire off clean the grove in the wheel and ring of all rust. It is NOT that difficult. Truck tires are put in cages because they are filled with high pressure. At the 25 or so pounds a DB tire gets you should be OK. Just point it away from you and fill it carefully and slowly making sure the ring is seated the whole way around. Might need a rubber hammer to seat it. 

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Without extensive tire and wheel experience I respectfully disagree with the above post. Don’t try it without someone who is very experienced. I have changed hundreds of them, and suffered a failure last year when the ring failed as we were inflating the tire. Part of the ring stuck in the ceiling 18 feet up, and another piece went clear through my new garage door installed earlier in the day. Fortunately we had it pointed in a safe direction for people and equipment, just not the building.

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I simply was trying to tell Brock it's not a big deal to change these tires, IF he wants to. I'm pushing 70 and choose not to be afraid of my cars and still change my own tires on three cars with this type of ring. I guess your leave it to the professional attitude could be used for brakes, batteries, suspension, maybe even putting gas in the tank. I choose to work on my cars. BTW, how did you become a professional changing as you say hundreds of them? Maybe one tire at a time?

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Since you asked........
 

 

I worked for Michelin in collage in the racing devision for North America, ran my own motorcycle shop, and owned a very large modern car repair shop. I have been in antique cars since I was very young. I bought my first CCCA Classic at the age of 14. Have owned more than fifty CCCA cars, and a handful of Brass and HCCA machines........and countless others. I manage one of the top car collections in the states........been around a LONG time. I have driven pre war cars tens of thousands of miles.......all over the world under almost every condition imaginable. The gentleman who was asking how to change tires had NO CLUE where to begin. A snap ring tire is NOT the place to learn how to do tires by hand. If they are so safe and simple, why do 98 percent of the garages refuse to service them? Most have split rim exclusions on their garage policy. 
 

The photo below is a Duesenberg wheel, snap ring, and tire. They were all new with less than fifty miles on them when the snap ring failed..........want to guess how i safely changed this one? I literally had to yell at people to keep away and not stick their face down by the wheel to look at it. The failure occurred while going down the road, the wheel did not strike anything. The failure occurred due to improper clearance between the ring and rim from too much clearance in the groove. Assembled by a restoration shop.........they didn’t catch it.


By the way, .............25 psi on the Dodge tire is a huge amount of stored energy, do the math............surface area of the tube in square inches at that pressure is very dangerous.

 

28DE2E93-EC3F-4D26-823F-85D7EAFC2262.jpeg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Whenever I changed a tire on a two or three piece rim I always placed the assembled wheel face up centered under the brake drum and lowered the car until the drum almost touched the wheel.  If there was a hoist in the shop I would put the wheel face up with an arm of the hoist lowered until it almost touched the rim. Then if it blew there was no where for the pieces to go. 

Before I started school I saw a mechanic in a trucking shop next door hit by a truck ring that went up to the roof and back down into his head.  Lots of excitement for a young kid.  He was a little slow afterwards and had a permanent one inch crease in his scalp.

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  • 1 month later...

I do all my DB lock ring wheels myself and they are pretty easy. I ALWAYS place them underneath a car when I inflate them so If they blow apart, I will be safe. May have to pull the car out of the shop rafters but that would be another story! I doubt any tire shop would do them. DO look for rust or cracks. I had a disc wheel split apart while on the back of a '24 roadster as a spare, during the night. Rim failed, not the lock ring. Glad I wasn't leaning over it getting something out of the trunk!

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