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So if you were going to sell all your stuff and buy a car to just wander the continent, what would it be? I just can't get behind motor homes, trailers, etc. I couldn't imagine driving one through Boston or Philly, etc.

 

For me, it would be a convertible. Comfortable to drive for hours. Not too small. Decent mileage. And dependable. I'm thinking American made so that finding a dealer would not be too difficult.

 

Probably a Camaro, just because I like GM products and the Corvette is too small for my taste.

 

What's your choice?

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Might as well do it in style and if I sold everything might even have a little change to buy something like this,  if the tax man didn't take it all. 

 

This one would do for me. 

I would just want Ed's Number on speed dial in case something arose. 

 

Might as well do it right if you are going to do it. 

 

IMG_20200724_131314009.thumb.jpg.244c936e08f691a52fc8bc965cd07cf3.jpg

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Now if I ever get around to getting the Auburn going and could get it equipped with a 32 2 speed rear,  then this might work as well.

It's a little more modest than the Duessy.   Wouldn't want to draw the wrong attention. 

 

 

I have heard that property around here,  out of the disaster areas the cities are turning into is starting to soar.  Can't say I blame them between the virus and the riots.  A little land and a big house has suddenly become a good thing. 

An article in the local paper the other day said houses are now selling within hours of being listed in this area if they are nice houses with a little land.  Glad we got ours before the rush. 

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Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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53-60 Cadillac eldorado convertible.  Large trunk, will keep up with most traffic, reliable when sorted, and surprisingly good gas mileage for what it is (ie decent range for a tank of gas less stopping). 
 


 

 

Edited by Cadillac Fan (see edit history)
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Probably a new Cadillac or Lincoln SUV. If you mean a vintage vehicle, a Chrysler Imperial 1957 - 66. If service and repair is a concern, a full size Chevrolet Pontiac Oldsmobile or Cadillac from the sixties or seventies. Another good choice would be a big Chrysler New Yorker or Imperial from the sixties or seventies.

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62-66 Chrysler product with the early style 318 and a 727 automatic. A stick would be good too if you could find one, but you won't. Completely rebuild the front suspension (a horrible job, but do it), sort it well and drive it daily for a while like you would any other antique when you first get it.

 

Don't forget to fix the heat riser, kit the carb, and adjust the valves. Unplug the oil drains while the valve covers are off. Replace the fuel pump. Put in a timing chain. Replace the coolant bypass hose, and make sure it has tight clamps. Get some high-quality radial tires. Kit the brake cylinders and fill with fresh brake fluid. Pack the wheel bearings. Rear ones, too. Adjust the bands in the transmission, change the filter, and change all the transmission fluid, including the torgue converter. Inspect the cooling lines. If they have any thin spots or pieces of hose in them, replace them. There shouldn't be hose. It's just brake tubing. Keep the engine full of fresh 20w50, and change it regularly. Carry extra oil, and check the oil every time you stop for gas.

 

You won't need speed dial, AAA, or anything else. You will ALWAYS get home. Things may fail, but nothing serious enough to stop you from moving.

 

Fun fact: There are large sections of this country where your phone wont work, where it gets over 100F, and there is nothing around for miles. It is even true if you stay on the Interstates. Speed dial or AAA won't do you much good until you have taken a long walk.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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"Speed dial or AAA won't do you much good until you have taken a long walk. " fortunately about a 1/4 mile out in the AZ desert there was a junk 62 Chevvy that had a coil my VW Westphalia liked.

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I had a 1954 Chrysler New Yorker that was one of the best road cars for long distance driving.

As my daily driver on the highway it would get 22-24 MPG with the 331 hemi with a 2 throat carburetor.

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1970 Buick Electra 225. Rides like a cloud and good for 20 mpg on the highway. The 455 has plenty of power when you need it and an absolute cross country land cruiser. 

1971 and later were EPA restricted so don't go there. 

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No info on whether this has to be a vintage car or modern.  A Ford Model A with some upgrades would be an adventure or behind the wheel of a BMW 7 series for luxury.  My goofy idea was to add adventure to the equation so I did all my biggest tours by motorcycle.

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I personally love driving a vintage Cadillac on road trips. I just had my'64 Sedan out this morning on a two hour round trip drive to Lancaster and back.

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Don't be so hard on the motor homes.

I like not even having to get out at rest areas to take a …..rest

And the refrigerator is right there too.

They make some nice well outfitted coaches these days that will even fit in parking space.

 

However it depends on the trip, a day or a week or a month, big difference.

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A very hard choice to make. Especially not knowing if it would be pre war or post war. I know it would have to be something full size as I would be drawn to stopping at a lot of shops and antique stores to take a look ( and no I don't need any more stuff have to much already)  I like cars with 4 doors - so a full size sedan /hardtop or station wagon  with no power windows, but a/c . For nostalgic reasons a 1960 Plymouth Fury III station wagon like I used to ride to Hershey in with my folks. I like Chrysler products of the 1960's, also GM cars of the 1965-70 era. Really like big Buick sedans and wagons and the styling of the 1965-66 Chevy full size wagons.

Pre war would be very hard to determine - can't make a choice right now .

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Had RVs. Decided a trailer made more sense since could leave where staying and drive around in the tow car.

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20200318_094618[1].jpg

 

1966 Dodge Coronet - 318 Automatic, the radio doesn't work but the convertible top does!  It's the prefect 4D tourer - you get a 360 degree view plus the smells of everything you go by.  My wife still remarks about the smell of a corn field at dusk as we drove by with the top down on a warm summer night a few years ago.   

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I drove coast to coast in a 1932 Ford hot rod once. I have also driven some brass era cars and V-8 Fords on long distance trips. If I were to go on another long distance drive it would be a tough choice. You want a car that is tough, reliable and easy to work on. You also need room for some supplies and comfort is a plus. You have to be prepared for any weather. I have always wanted to travel the entire Lincoln Highway. There is a great PBS documentary about the Lincoln. So why not use a car that helped plot the route originally. I would drive a 1915 Packard Twin-Six Touring. Plenty of power. Very reliable. Comfortable for sure and lots of room for supplies. You know tent, chairs, sleeping bags, stove, food, etc... 

15pac316.jpg

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17 hours ago, padgett said:

Had RVs. Decided a trailer made more sense since could leave where staying and drive around in the tow car.

 

Yes, trailers are good too.

But I am just the opposite of you along those lines. (both right of coarse) 

I am usually wanting to bring along a car that wont tow a trailer.

When I bring a car with the motor home it is trailered. No dollies or flat towing for long trips as you never know when you may need to back up.

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KInda wish there was somewhere to go now with all this road trip talk.

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On 7/28/2020 at 3:36 AM, auburnseeker said:

Might as well do it in style and if I sold everything might even have a little change to buy something like this,  if the tax man didn't take it all. 

 

This one would do for me. 

I would just want Ed's Number on speed dial in case something arose. 

 

Might as well do it right if you are going to do it. 

 

IMG_20200724_131314009.thumb.jpg.244c936e08f691a52fc8bc965cd07cf3.jpg

Nice choice ,  love it suit me fine too 😀

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14 hours ago, 3macboys said:

20200318_094618[1].jpg

 

1966 Dodge Coronet - 318 Automatic, the radio doesn't work but the convertible top does!  It's the prefect 4D tourer - you get a 360 degree view plus the smells of everything you go by.  My wife still remarks about the smell of a corn field at dusk as we drove by with the top down on a warm summer night a few years ago.   

Most those smells are memorable for a good reason but every so often,  the long expired road crosser or Skunk kind of make you speed up a bit to try to clear out the nostrils. On return trips also make you remember where you need to practice how long you can hold your breath.  ;) 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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License and insurance for a trailer & tow car is a lot less than an RV and a Toad. Has always been a factor in my thinking.

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On 7/29/2020 at 10:26 AM, JACK M said:

KInda wish there was somewhere to go now with all this road trip talk.

How about any of the National Parks? That’s what I’d do if I had your rig. 

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While most won’t be anywhere near within OPs interest range (i.e. late model, less than 10 year old 4-passenger convertible for adequate dealer service/support network ?), there are some great (vintage) road trip cars and experiences with them in  “Long distance driving/traveling with vintage cars“ discussion/thread (Sorry, I still don’t know how to provide a direct link to it or other threads.)

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, victorialynn2 said:

How about any of the National Parks? That’s what I’d do...

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Unless one is into self-sufficient/-supported camping, access to meals/dining & overnight accommodations may present problems.

Due to potential lack of appropriate "accommodations", we had to cancel all our road trip plans for this summer 😞, but hopefully can make up for the lost adventures in the future 🤞

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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There are small fully self sufficient camper trailers that include AC and shower/toilet.. Personally I like TrailManors since easy to tow (fold down) and hard sides so safe from animals. Many full and medium sized cars since the 50's can tow, just need a receiver hitch and a brake controller (electric). some are AACA eligible (but best have aluminum framing).

 

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I have to admit that our '41 Limited is about as good as an old car gets for long-distance cruising. Comfortable for everyone, lots of space for gear, fast enough to hit the highways when necessary, bulletproof reliable, etc. But without A/C, old cars get really hot and after a long day behind the wheel in any of our old cars, I'm pretty burned out and the family is grumpy. My suggestion if you're serious about going cross-country:

 

76driversnew.jpg

 

Giant, lots of space for everyone, adequately powerful, comfortable, smooth, insanely quiet, bulletproof reliable with unbeatable parts availability, and with working A/C it'll keep you comfortable all day long. I don't love them, but if you want to eat up a lot of pavement, this is the ideal tool for the job.

 

Just don't buy a brown one.

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22 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

I have to admit that our '41 Limited is about as good as an old car gets for long-distance cruising. Comfortable for everyone, lots of space for gear, fast enough to hit the highways when necessary, bulletproof reliable, etc. But without A/C, old cars get really hot and after a long day behind the wheel in any of our old cars, I'm pretty burned out and the family is grumpy. My suggestion if you're serious about going cross-country:

 

76driversnew.jpg

 

Giant, lots of space for everyone, adequately powerful, comfortable, smooth, insanely quiet, bulletproof reliable with unbeatable parts availability, and with working A/C it'll keep you comfortable all day long. I don't love them, but if you want to eat up a lot of pavement, this is the ideal tool for the job.

 

Just don't buy a brown one.

That is a featured car in a TV series my wife and I are watching. It's called "Schitts Creek". Very dry humor...

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Back in the 70's this was my tow/trip car. AC and cruise. 400 4bbl and posi economy (3.08) axle. I like two seaters (folding rear) with a lot of luggage space. Self centering in a high crosswind. My Grand Cherokee is the same car for this century but one better: DOHC-6.

 

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I bought this 1991 LeSabre recently.  It's roomy, comfortable, rides like it's on a cloud, has a great sound system and a big trunk.  I had the a/c recharged and it blows nice and cold now.  The more I drive it, the better I like it.  I think it would make a great road-trip car.

20200504_161259_Burst01.jpg

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I have to agree with Skylark. I bought my '92 Park Avenue in 2000 off our used car lot. It has 315000 KM on it now and gets about 32 MPG (Cdn gallon). The seats are like a living room sofa and the trunk is huge by today's standard.We have a Ford Escape which is a good day-to-day beater,but I still prefer the old Buick for a long haul.

1992 Buick Park Avenue.jpg

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