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Pressurized oil system questions?


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Just recently acquired 1927 Speedster. It has a pressurized oil system and filter.

When I get a "new" car, I like to go fluids. When I check the oil level with the upper petcock (on the hogshead) a quantity of oil comes out. Usually this is an overabundance of oil, and I open the petcock and let it run until level, but the oil filter and system is higher than the petcock.

Does the oil pressure system use the same level of oil, ie, open the higher petcock?
 

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Hard to say because no one knows what the person did (or tried to do) when they installed the pressurized system. I would take the lower inspection cover off and see what is going on inside.

 

I am assuming the oil pump is scavenging oil from the bottom of the crankcase (the hogs head is above the crankcase) and then pushes it through the external oil lines, then it goes into the  area above the lower inspection cover and into the filter and as the filter fills up, it goes back into the crankcase. I wouldn't think there is any need to have oil above the upper petcock, but I wouldn't know for sure until I looked inside and saw what the engine builder had in mind. I don't see any reason for extra oil but I might be missing something. 

 

Most of the time when someone installs pressurized oiling on a Model T, they fit a later aftermarket, internal oil pump (VW is often used) to the rear of the engine block and it is driven by the end of the camshaft. Of course, this would be inside the engine so you would not be able to see it unless you took the whole transmission cover assembly (hogshead) off. Another way of doing it is to install an external oil pump using the generator mount or the timer area (in front of the camshaft). However, if you do it this way you will have to forego either the generator or modify the ignition system location (timer, distributor or ?). 

 

Hope this makes sense. 

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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On custom oiling systems, I like to drop the pan, pull the valve covers, and run a pressure pot on the system to see how everything is functioning. Also, it's a good way to check for cracked lines...........we use the pot in the shop several times a year, and it holds about 15 gallons of oil, which we can regulate the pressure........works great to check the oil pressure dump also. 

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motoringicons, I allowed some few oil drip out and it did not have only about an ounce from the upper petcock, and it looked relatively clean. I think it is appropriate to the oil level.

 

The Ruckstell was slightly overfilled and the viscosity was about like thin honey. Also clean. The car was well maintained. Somebody really loved it.

It even has a tandem trailer (of course not needed with a Model T), and it is also very well done. Custom for the car. It has matching hubcaps, from a 1950s car. I can see the driver/owner taking it to meets/races. I wonder how it competed. I cannot find any images on Google. It would seem it was a "significant car" in it's day. 

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A remote oil can or "pot" that acts like an oil pump that you hook up to the cars oiling system. It basically applies oil pressure at any number of pounds you dial it in at to check for excessive oil bells by, leaks, and to see if all parts of an engine are being lubricated. Many expensive cars have pre oilers on them, which makes pressure in the engine BEFORE you even hit the starter. Common on airplanes as well. If you have pre war cars, it's a required item. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Drained the oil. Then pulled the filter (There is a bolt on top that drops the filter housing). It was seriously clogged with crud. Cleaned the housing inside and out. Filled the housing with fresh oil, then added fresh oil Non-Detergent. 

 

Pulled one of the oil lines that feed the engine mains. Used a hand pump (handy to add 600w to the diff) and pumped in fresh oil to prime the pump.

 

Took the oil line going to the gauge and blew through it with my air hose. Gauge worked fine. 

 

Put everything back together, fired it up and HAVE OIL PRESSURE!  It was so sweet to see the needle peg! 

 

Set the timing on the advance/retard until found the "sweet spot" in the middle of the range. 

 

Carburetors (Solex) running a little lean. I think I need richer jets. Gotta figure this out.

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  • 4 weeks later...

What tells you it is running lean?Fussing with jets is not easy.

You probably have a high compression head too right.

I ve seen these T speedster jobs appear to run lean from way to hot a spark plug .Matching better suited temp plugs for the higher compression and correct gap of plugs may help.

But what do I know..?

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Possibly the problem was diagnosed by an OCD good mechanic. I was not clear in my post. One of the Solex carbs was missing the pilot jet. I installed two new ones at .55 (stock). Running well. After installing the new pilot jets. It is running very well. But I think these pilot jets have something to do with idle. Have not yet checked the plugs. Will be back. 

Don't think it has a high compression head. It is iron, piston tops through the spark plug hole are flat top. I am not a great mechanic. Don't seem to have the automotive mechanical intuition. Don't have the patience! Too often I just replace parts and were not needed. 

The Speedster has a lot of mods I can see, but no papers came with the car as to what was done. No one can help me as to how to adjust dual Solex carbs (Seems to be a 1972 VW). How these should be adjusted for a VW engine? How do I wed them to a 1927 Model T Ford?

I have a Canadian engine. Very powerful and surprisingly fast. I have several other Model Ts that are stock.

I am gapping the plugs at .025, I have read that changing gaps can help, but not sure how to set at what gap?

The overall condition of the Speedster is very well done. I heard it was set up in the early 1990s. Great pinstriping. Someone put a lot of love and money into it, even with a custom built trailer. I have posted on many Model T forums, but nobody knows about it.

 

 

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Wow! What a nice looking and thought out speedster.

You really need to get into the forums of the old time hot rodders and things like the Jalopy Journal/H.A.M.B ,Secrets of Speed Society etc. 

I think it would very odd for someone to add dual carbs and pressure oiling and so on and not boost the compression which is what gives the most positive gains in performance with the least effort ,especially in a Model T Ford.

The iron cylinder head could have been easily milled down. Stock heads in good condition were back in the day ( and are still today by some )milled off a mind blowing 1/4" if the water jackets holes can take it..I've had a few heads milled .125 or 1/8" as a minimum on a otherwise stock T Ford. 

 

It wouldn't surprise me if the valves where enlarged too on your car.

 

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Flivverking, it could be a milled head, but I don't know how since I got zero paperwork. The only things I know are from deduction. I guess I pull the head and the oil pan, someone thinks I have a possible balanced crank, or maybe a Model A. Only way to find out is if  I pull it apart, but I am having a blast driving it!
 

It has a lot of power, getting bored with my other Model Ts as it is much faster and accelerates strong. I may install the Rocky Mountain Brakes. And the straight through exhaust has an incredible sound. 

Yup, I am in love!


I am on HAMB and will check out Secrets of Speed Society.

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There is a clue to a Model A crankshaft visible from the outside!

A Model A crankshaft has a threaded hole in the nose for the hand crank ratchet. Even if it has been plugged the start of the thread can still bee seen.

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