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Worn out door handles


WPVT

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I imagine it would be possible to drill out the enlarged holes and to insert a bushing.  The hole became worn because the handle ,shaft or both became worn.  Therein lies the problem.  Without fixing the reason for the loose handle (the pin only holds the handle on) repairing the hole is futile.

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Thanks. That's a good point. I'm guessing the square broached hole in the handle is worn, since the handle is die cast and the latch spindle steel. But you're absolutely right. The pin isn't supposed to be taking the torque. 

I'm not a fan of epoxy products, but wouldn't filling in the wear in the die cast  square hole be the kind of thing that an epoxy based metal filler could be expected to do ?  Dealing with the worn pin hole will be easy enough.

Edited by WPVT (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, WPVT said:

wouldn't filling in the wear in the die cast  square hole be the kind of thing that an epoxy based metal filler could be expected to do ? 

 

For a little while. In addition, If you can machine the handle holes to line up with the same size hole in the door shaft for both to accept a roll pin you will be good for awhile..................Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, WPVT said:

Thanks. That's a good point. I'm guessing the square broached hole in the handle is worn, since the handle is die cast and the latch spindle steel. But you're absolutely right. The pin isn't supposed to be taking the torque. 

I'm not a fan of epoxy products, but wouldn't filling in the wear in the die cast  square hole be the kind of thing that an epoxy based metal filler could be expected to do ?  Dealing with the worn pin hole will be easy enough.

It might work like that if there wasn't so much stress on it as there is.

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8 minutes ago, WPVT said:

I'm not a fan of epoxy products, but wouldn't filling in the wear in the die cast  square hole be the kind of thing that an epoxy based metal filler could be expected to do ?

A decade or so ago memory:  I think it was Locktite maybe, there was a new product kit to repair threads.  Super duper epoxy that came with a special release agent.  You coated the good bolt with the release, then fill the stripped hole with the epoxy, let it cure and then the bolt turns right out, with no problem. 

 

I'd bet that would work on square holes in your handles if you had a jig to hold it straight while it cured?  You'd have to fill the cross pin hole in your square steel shaft with wax or something, or you won't be able to get it apart.

 

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The epoxy might work IF the rest of the door mechanism (hinges, latches dovetails and alignment) was fixed to operate as new, and IF the people opening the door were a little (well probably a LOT) gentler.  I find so many people twist/turn a handle as far as it will go, not just until the door unlatches.  

We really have become rough with things.  In older books they talk about "covering" the brake pedal as you come to an intersection, today many/most people do not refer to stepping on the brakes they stomp on them.  Many people do not depress the clutch until it is disengaged they stomp the pedal to the floor.  With floor or toe board mounted starters many people don't depress the pedal until the starter engages, they stomp on it.

Enough mini rant said.

Good luck with your handles.

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WPVT.

Could you not just drill new holes 90 degrees to the current ones and use a roll pin ?

You could also fashion a beer can strip into a square and slip it in the pocket to tighten up the joint too.

So the roll pin is not doing all the work.

 

 

Mike in Colorado

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Thanks. I'm going to have to take a close look next opportunity and see why the handle was able to get that loose to begin with. The square hole must be pretty rounded over at this point is my guess. 

I'm going to review the different metal filled epoxies that are available. Some of them are designed for adding wear resistance to material chutes, etc., so they must have a certain kind of strength. Sort of like sintered metal. I would never use an epoxy to stand up on its own, or as a weld, but as a filler, it might hold up. 

I may also try tapping the spindle and using a flat machine screw instead of a pin. That way it would be holding the handle tight to the spindle. 

I like to try fixing what's there before I replace with another part. Just as a challenge.

 

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There are special alloys for welding aluminum. Wonder if you could weld up the holes and redrill to the right size? I would want to practice on a door handle I could afford to throw away just in case. But, I have used the aluminum welding  rod with a special propane torch and it worked well and did not damage the aluminum. Never tried it on a door handle or trim piece.

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Rusty,

     I thought of that but had visions of the handle going up in flame like magnesium in high school science lab. I think I could fill and redrill the holes, but the problem is really the square hole being worn, as TinIndian pointed out. I'm not sure I could broach or otherwise reproduce a blind, square shaped hole after the filling the existing, worn one. 

    Stay tuned...I'll experiment later this week.

    And thanks.

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