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Original Survivor Car Question for HPOF Class>>1925 yr.


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Hi guys, just a question of what should be done to a all original car as far as presevation.

I have a mid 20's Packard, all original paint, leather, under 50,000 miles. 

My question is dirt and grease on the engine, tranny, firewall, frame, springs, gaiters, front and rear axles, etc. Is it ok to remove the grime from those area's, or should I just leave it alone??? The engine crankcase is aluminum. Does the AACA, CCCA, Packard Club, Pebble Beach, shows,  etc. prefer these items untouched with 95 year old dirt, grease, or clean it without removing any of the old paint, etc. Maybe if I remove the grime from the aluminum crankcase it might stick out like a sore thumb. Any thoughts appreciated. 

Thanks, Jim

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Clean Please!  As you said clean while trying to preserve the original paint.  Gently does it.  BTW, there is a deduction in HPOF for "excess dirt".  We don't want "barn finds" where you can't see the originality of the car for all the dirt.

Edited by 61polara (see edit history)
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11 hours ago, 34LaSalleClubSedan said:

Hi guys, just a question of what should be done to a all original car as far as presevation.

I have a mid 20's Packard, all original paint, leather, under 50,000 miles. 

My question is dirt and grease on the engine, tranny, firewall, frame, springs, gaiters, front and rear axles, etc. Is it ok to remove the grime from those area's, or should I just leave it alone??? The engine crankcase is aluminum. Does the AACA, CCCA, Packard Club, Pebble Beach, shows,  etc. prefer these items untouched with 95 year old dirt, grease, or clean it without removing any of the old paint, etc. Maybe if I remove the grime from the aluminum crankcase it might stick out like a sore thumb. Any thoughts appreciated. 

Thanks, Jim

This car sounds fantastic- can we get a glimpse of it please?

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I have done HPOF cars and I would clean it up, though not really restore anything other than deteriorated electrical.  

 

Perhaps just try mineral spirits and solder brushes with the bristles cut down to make more a scrub brush.

 

For serious grease I have also used miniature pick sets to get down to a level that is manageable. 

 

Or, you could try an engine degreaser of some sort , but would still only do it in small sections.

 

Keep in mind a preservation car often really takes longer tend can be more challenging than a restoration - no quick way about dealing with anything and if you do then probably will not be happy - I know a lot of people that are quick to short sheet the bed as they have no patience. 

 

Keep in  mind that grease is also protecting, so best to have a nice garage to park your car in.  

 

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I belong to the antique outboard group. They turned me on to cleaning original motors with WD40. Doesn't bother the paint. Works good with soft brushes or micro fiber towels. Leaves a nice protective  finish  when done. I like them original and this works great. I have used this method on my old cars for hard to reach spots and small parts. Hope this helps. Dave.

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14 hours ago, dbdave26 said:

I belong to the antique outboard group. They turned me on to cleaning original motors with WD40. Doesn't bother the paint. Works good with soft brushes or micro fiber towels. Leaves a nice protective  finish  when done. I like them original and this works great. I have used this method on my old cars for hard to reach spots and small parts. Hope this helps. Dave.

That reminds me - Armour-All is a great grease cutter (I have used to clean up many 70's and newer engines and occasionally something that is older restored. 

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For light grease and oil removal, I like Oil-Eater, an enzyme-based product, which does not attack paint.  It's especially useful on repainted/rebuilt engines as it leaves no coating, but it's usually necessary to use a water-soaked-and-wrung-out rag to remove a filmy initial residue.

Edited by Grimy (see edit history)
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When you start a new topic or reply to a topic on the bottom of the box on the left you can drag or choose pictures from tour desktop or search elsewhere and double click on the picture that you want.  if your pictures are very large you may only be able to load one or two and then have to come back in to load more.

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On ‎7‎/‎25‎/‎2020 at 5:44 PM, 34LaSalleClubSedan said:

I'll see if I can get a couple pics of the car next week. Thanks, Jim

mid 1920's...is it a 2nd series Packard?

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On 8/1/2020 at 9:32 AM, md murray said:

mid 1920's...is it a 2nd series Packard?

Yes, early 1st half of the 2nd series run. 8 Cylinder. 136" W.B. Has the later 3rd series one piece windshield and top irons rather than sockets which gives it a low profile when the top is down

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Thanks Ed for posting the pics of my 1925 Packard 8 model 236.

Original unrestored

The Black and White photo is a picture of the car taken the 4th of July 1931 in Glenwood, Minnesota

The picture in color as it looks today. Thanks again Ed !!!

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Wonderful car. Sporty yet regal at the same time. Proportions are right on The rear mounted spare tire adds to the apparent length and lack of sidemounts allows the long hood to stand out. And with blackwall tires that has to be one of the best designs ever.

 

Don

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I cleaned the grease and built up road grime off my HPOCF Chevrolet and since the parts had been protected they looked brand new. The judge that climbed under the car accused me of replacing my front end parts and was going to ding me on the undercarriage but I was there and able to explain.  I guess it was too clean.

 

Dave

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12 hours ago, 34LaSalleClubSedan said:

Thanks Ed for posting the pics of my 1925 Packard 8 model 236.

Original unrestored

The Black and White photo is a picture of the car taken the 4th of July 1931 in Glenwood, Minnesota

The picture in color as it looks today. Thanks again Ed !!!

Wow!  Amazing car.  What a beauty! Thanks for sharing.  It’s nice when cars like these find the right caretaker like yourself.

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15 hours ago, 34LaSalleClubSedan said:

Yes, early 1st half of the 2nd series run. 8 Cylinder. 136" W.B. Has the later 3rd series one piece windshield and top irons rather than sockets which gives it a low profile when the top is down

Wow! 236 runabout, what a wonderful car! It's exciting to know that an original example exists. -and thank you for sharing it with us. I can't think of too many objects on god's green earth that are quite as exciting as an all-original pre war car. :P

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Thanks again Ed for posting the pics of my car. 

 

In the early picture of the car taken in 1931 is my great uncle, Gilman Hanson of Glenwood, MN, then later Appleton Minnesota. This Packard was purchased new by the DuPont Company unpainted. It also features the year ahead lower one piece windshield rather than taller 2 piece and top irons rather than sockets. The top folds down about 1/2 the height as compared to sockets for a better more streamline look as in later Packard runabouts/roadsters. DuPont painted the car with the then fairly new DuPont Duco fast drying paint. Painted silver and black with red pin stripes. 

It was shown around the U.S. auto shows to promote the new Duco paint. On each side of the lower cowl is the painted DuPont Duco Logo. After it was at the Twin City auto show in Minnesota it ended up with Joy Brothers Packard of St. Paul. 

My family had a relative who was a salesman at Joy Brothers. He contacted my great uncle and told him about this car. My great uncle drove into the cities in those days was about 3 hours, traded in his 1918 Packard Twin Six touring and purchased this Packard. Without telling his 2 young daughters what he was doing that day he left and came home the same day. His daughters recalled they where walking home from downtown Glenwood to their home near the golf course when this brand new Packard went driving by with its top up. They said they both gave a wolf whistle after it went zooming by having now idea their father was driving it. When they got home they were delighted to see this car in their driveway and it was theirs...........

The rest of the story later🙂

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