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Beavertail on Trailer - Good or Bad?


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I'm getting ready to purchase an enclosed car trailer in the next month or two, and curious as to what fellow members think about having a beavertail (slightly lower floor at the ramp door entrance) on the trailer.  Lower ramp angle for entrance seems like a good thing, but I've heard others say they don't like beavertails because the trailer is more likely to drag on the entrances to some parking lots, driveways, and fields for trailer parking.  Before making  a decision, I'd appreciate input from other members.

 

For background, we have a 1970 Chevelle, and I'm thinking of a 22-ft or 24-ft Intech aluminum trailer with side escape door.  This will be our only trailer purchase, so I want to get it right the first time.  (We've been using an older 22-ft Pace enclosed, steel-framed trailer (no interior cabinets) and it's worked fine.  I'm considering a 24-ft trailer because it would provide more flexibility for possible future additions to our garage and probably better resale when I'm too decrepit and have to sell our cars.)

 

Thanks in advance for your help and suggestions!

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24 foot is the best trailer for resale. Beaver tail is fine.......and it’s normal. Don’t worry about it. Also, one foot taller will make it ten times more salable when you want to sell, as a standard height eliminates most pre war cars. Buy the best trailer you can afford, they hold value better. If possible get 16 inch wheels and larger brakes......upgrading to a 10 or 12k trailer gvw makes for less maintenance as everything is heavier.........and trust me, most of the trailers today Are built much more cheaply than in the past. Good luck, Ed

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I agree with everything Ed said.  You may want to consider a V-nose trailer as you will add some storage space.  I believe a 10k gvw trailer is the heaviest you can tow without a CDL.

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A few extra considerations if you really want to get it right the first time:

 

1. 4 ft passenger side door

2. Driver-side escape door extra long and full height, possibly opening canopy-style to provide shade and rain coverage.

3. Diamond deck plate floor - less susceptible to wood rot in a humid area like yours and mine

4. Multiple roof vents

5. Multiple side wall vents

6. multiple tie-downs to adapt to multiple cars (my 24 ft V-nose trailer has 8 pairs, 4 front and 4 rear)

7. Electric winch

8. Electric tongue jack

9. At least a foot additional height (as Dave mentioned, above)

10. a pair of 6K axles on 16" wheels, but have trailer "Rated" as 9,990 lb - better brakes, better suspension, etc

11. Load range "E" or better tires - recently upgraded to "G" at Ed's suggestion - there is no substitute for safety

12. We had our built with a raised floor to allow for a shorter internal wheel box - so can open '50s/'60s car door inside of trailer without hitting wheel box

13. Additional lighting on ceiling - preferably at sides, not just over roof of car

14. Lighting in floor, front, center, and rear - makes tie-down easy - especially at night, or when you have to work under the car

15. Lighting at lower portion of sidewalls (same reason as above)

16. Equalizer hitch - all the difference in the world

17. Fold-out stair at entrance door - we're not getting younger

18. storage for tools, towing equipment, etc.

19. area to easily attach and maintain at least two (2) spare tires, maybe a 3rd spare for safekeeping - so you don't lose the balance of the day the first time you need to use one

20. At least a 2500 Series tow vehicle as a minimum

 

I'll probably think of more later, but that is a fair start-

 

Safe trailering doesn't happen by accident

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, 61polara said:

I agree with everything Ed said.  You may want to consider a V-nose trailer as you will add some storage space.  I believe a 10k gvw trailer is the heaviest you can tow without a CDL.


My trailer is rated for 22k, and it doesn’t require a CDL. California has some crazy restrictions on trailers, but the Federal DOT rules allow out of state drivers an exemption. I think the maximum speed hauling a trailer is 55 also. 

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To answer your question about a “ beaver tail “ specifically:

 

Some manufacturers create one by cutting the frame member at an angle - you can tell by crawling under the trailer.

 

They are weakening the frame at the rear of the trailer.

 

This contributes to broken welds that leads to “ racking “ which is the collapse of the square trailer opening.

 

You need clearance at the rear of a trailer to go over the normal everyday low driveways - dips - crests in roadways that drag at the back of a trailer.

 

Jim

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, edinmass said:


My trailer is rated for 22k, and it doesn’t require a CDL. California has some crazy restrictions on trailers, but the Federal DOT rules allow out of state drivers an exemption. I think the maximum speed hauling a trailer is 55 also. 

In Calif, if you have a Calif driver's license, a Class C (regular passenger car license) license allows you to drive a prime mover (including motor homes) of up to 26,000 lbs, but a towed trailer must RATED (sticker--many people ask for an "administrative downgrade" to 9,990 lbs when ordering a trailer) under 10,000 lbs gross.  And you must get a Calif D/L within 10 days of moving to the state.  So that's what WE are stuck with...

 

You can get a Class A non-commercial license which allows you to exceed that weight which requires an annual specific physical, DMV driving test with trailer (somebody else has to drive your rig to the test site) but no log book or hours of service rules.

Edited by Grimy
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Mark,

 

Beavertail:

 

In the 15 years I have had my current trailer I have attended DOZENS of AACA Meets. Those meets have had trailer parking on blacktop and all sorts of grass (and Mud) surfaces. Hotel parking has been on all sorts of surfaces in all kinds of conditions with all sorts of angled driveways,etc. Knock on wood, I have NOT ONCE ran into a situation where the beaver tail of my trailer hit or dragged on any surface. I will say that in some instances NOT having the beaver tail on my trailer would have been a BIG PAIN in the you know what. That 4 feet of slope and the ramp door  gave me a lot of flexibility in more than a couple situations. Case in point, the trailer parking area at the Gettysburg National a few years ago among others. That field had a lot of good areas to park a trailer on but there were some that were not so good as I found out first hand.

 

Other things to consider.

 

For me, E-Track (hands down) beats D-Rings to secure a vehicle. Throw a wheel basket over each wheel and tighten them down and your done. Depending on the size of your escape door and vehicle you may be able to secure the two driver side wheels while standing outside the trailer.  Curbside you may be able to get access to the front tire from the access door (especially if it is extra wide. If the space inside the trailer is tight for the curbside rear tire on the car you might consider a lift up door opening in that area. That way when you are old and decrepit you will not have to be crawling around on the trailer floor (then have to get up)  to anchor your car down using D-Rings. One thing to remember with E-Track is that it is very important that the vehicles tires sit as close to the center of the E-Track as possible. I am fortunate that the 4 vehicles I tow sit in just about the center of the E-Track I have. If you are thinking about other vehicles in the future you may have to consider mounting two sets of E-Track side by side to give you more flexibility. This would not be an issue for surface mount E-Track on a wood trailer floor. Another consideration for E-Track is to anchor it directly into the floor frame rails with hardware that will not rust. I was just under my 15 year old trailer a few weeks ago and not one, single E-track mounting nut or bolt was rusted and they are all original.

 

Spare tire mounting:

 

Absolutely pass on getting any optional in floor spare tire compartments. Mount your two spare trailer tires on one of vertical wall supports near the ramp door (one on each side of the trailer). Give VERY careful consideration to how high you mount the spare tires. Too low and they might get in the way or come close to brushing the side of the vehicle being towed. Too high and you may find it difficult to get the spare tire off the wall when you need it. 

 

Suspension:

 

Torsion suspension is the way to go. I have it on my trailer.  Some trailer makers use spring suspensions to keep costs down. Not a fan of those myself.

I am a big fan of EZ-Lube Axles. Most trailer makers use these but it pays to be sure you are getting them.

 

Wireless Rear Camera:

 

This is a DIY add on you can do later. This will be some of the best money you can spend on your trailer. Being able to see directly behind your trailer and off to the sides a bit is VERY VERY helpful. There is even newer trailer camera technology that literally lets you see through your trailer so to speak.This technology involves multiple cameras and a program that puts the input from those cameras together which makes it appear that your trailer has disappeared. I have had a basic wireless camera on my 8.5 x 20' trailer for years now. I have used it multiple times when I have had to parallel park my trailer. Once on the way to AGNM it helped me avoid hitting someone walking behind my trailer who either could not hear the VERY LOUD backup beeper on my trailer or was ignoring it.

 

Back Up Beeper (DIY):

 

Get yourself a dump truck back up beeper to mount to the rear of your trailer then connect it to the backup lights. On a grass trailer parking area at a National a trailer that is backing up is a danger to anyone behind it. I have one of these on my trailer. I also installed a kill switch so that just before I get home I can turn it off. That helps me keep the peace with my neighbors when getting home at night.

 

Ramp Door Lights:

 

I installed a pair of lights above my ramp door and connected them to a remote control unit (about $30 on amazon). Has come in handy an number of times when pulling into a National after dark or getting home after dark. BTW, the remote control I mention lets you control 4 different items so you could use this for the backup beeper as well.

 

LED Light Bars  I mounted two, 5' long LED bars on the bottom edge of my trailer. These bars have either white LEDs or Yellow LEDs. In normal mode they default to yellow and act as turn signal/lane changing lights. When I am towing on a country road that has no white line on the edge of it I switch to the white LEDs that stay on. This has come in handy at Nationals where back roads have no street lights and no white lines on the edge of the roadway.

 

Tow Vehicle:

 

When it comes to a tow vehicle it is all about the individual vehicle's ratings which are determined by the individual vehicle configuration. Do not automatically think that 150/250/350 or 1500/2500/3500 designations mean you are good to go. I found out first hand when shopping for a truck that these designations have devolved into simply marketing names/hype over recent years when it comes to some truck makers and are far from a true indication of capability. Case in point I looked at TWO different GMC 2500HDs and BOTH of them had lower rating numbers than the other truck I was looking at (what people would call a 1/2 ton). The cab configuration, engine, brakes, rear axle ratio, etc of both 2500s are what made these vehicles basically 1/2 towing vehicles according to specs provided by GM.

Bottom line is to crunch the numbers of an individual truck to get the most accurate picture of it's capability and do not get hung up on the 1/2, 3/4, 1 ton marketing designations which no longer reflect their real capabilities.

 

Charlie

Edited by charlier (see edit history)
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I agree with Charlie, I have had beaver tails in all six of the trailers I have owned, and only twice bottomed out.......in very ridiculous circumstances............my 34 foot tag has huge roller wheels across the back in the event of a drag........and haven’t used them yet. All of Charlie’s points are good....and I agree with them. I do get two in the floor spare boxes......To store other items.......and I carry three to eight spares depending on the trip, the mileage, and the weight. If you have ever hauled out to The Bonneville salt flats in Midsummer you will know why you need eight spares. Buy the best, heaviest trailer you can afford.......it’s cheap life insurance. Same goes with the truck. Since I collect big heavy iron, I am always running heavy, and on the high end of legal speed as long as conditions are optimal. Was soon as rain, snow, wind, or heavy traffic becomes a concern, O take a day or two off. Better safe than sorry. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Charlie and Ed are on target--

I carry two of my spares attached to the sidewalls of the wedge and tapered nose of my trailer, but typically carry at least four more mounted spares on the floor of the nose area, next to the tool boxes and the heavy duty plastic wedge used to elevate a good tire  so that the flat needing changing is elevated without manual jacking (loosen the lugs before pulling onto the ramp). You can't have too many spares, or be too prepared when trailering cross-country !

 

This year for fathers day, the kids got me a super

DeWalt Impact wrench (adjustable),

a set of Torque Sticks, 

a set of both metric and SAE impact sockets,

and bag to keep it all handy, and separate from my regular tools

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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I would NOT own a trailer without one! Another advantage besides the fact that it is easier to load a low car is that most manufacturers raise the trailer height if it has a beaver/dove tail, so that the inner fender wells are very short allowing for it to be much easier to open the car door inside the trailer without hitting the well. I believe my inner wells 

are only about 4 inches high. 

 

Quality manufacturers weld the cut & then plate both sides of the area making that spot probably the Strongest part of the frame! Well over a million miles on my aluminum Ameri-Lite 24 ft enclosed trailer with NO frame cracks ! Trailers are just like transporters....You Get What You Pay For!!!!

 

God Bless

Bill

https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/nationwide-single-car-transport-hauling-open-or-enclosed.614419/

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Wow I've been lurking watching this one and have only a couple things to add in my experience with similiar cars.

 

1. I have carried a battery operated impact gun for years.  At last years Ocala meet I blew 5 tires on that round trip towing out of Maryland.  Carrying only 3 spares I had to overnight until a tire store opened!  The impact gun did all 5 as quickly as a NASCAR pit stop along side I-95.

2.  ATC designed the escape door to match the car door opening while in the trailer at the sweet spot. I just fully open the door and step out.  My trailer looks funny as the escape door isn't centered over the tandem axles it is about 10" forward.

3. Dont worry about trying to have a raised deck or other $ changes.  I just have two 2X8's at marked places to drive car onto and that raises the drivers side enough to clear on only one of my cars as others don't need it. 

4.  TOW Truck!  with a 9,900 GVW trailer only tow it with a one ton no 250's or these other brands funny rated 3/4 ton trucks

5. Since you are legally required to stop at inspection and scales in Maryland do not go with a 12,000 GVW trailer unless a CDL card holder. Until recently Maryland required a medical card which I have for towing over certain GCVW but still under 26,000.

I realize the above will wake up Ed!  But several other states are in the legal process of scaling at truck stops by weight not class of vehicle.

6.  Do not title your truck or trailer in a business or LLC name then you are most definitely "commercial'.

7. I think the market on aluminum trailers is moving to 28 feet but a 24 is perfect for a Chevelle.  NO to the 22's as you can't adjust the car too much for the perfect tongue weight.  

Robert

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If Maryland has adopted the federal DOT standard, which they must to get the federal highway funds, than a vehicle legal in it’s state of origin than it’s legal in all 48 lower states, this applies under the drivers license reciprocity rules adopted by ALL the states .........interstate commerce clause applies. That said, there must be a definitive answer. If COMMERCIAL then all bets are off. The exemption is for recreational use, not for gain. That said, you can still be in the right, and have a problem if the local authorities decide to give you grief, weather you deserve it.....or not. I bet if you sent a registered letter to Maryland asking for a definitive answer.....you wouldn’t get one. Fortunately for me, I very rarely go through Maryland. I’m sure at some time they will try and target any revenue stream that they possibly can. 
 

According to one Maryland web page, they claim a show horse trailer that is competing for a trophy is a “for gain” use. In my case, my trailer is enclosed, with no windows, and they can not open it or search it without a warrant. Thus, my truck, and trailer are registered in my name, and I am on vacation, I am not subject to the rules. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I agree with a battery impact gun as stated above. Fantastic and a required tool for anyone who hauls a trailer. With my triple axel I had a flat on the way to Amelia this year. I pulled over, spun off the lugs, pulled the tire and tossed it into the bed of the truck. And was on my way in less than two minutes. Got off at the next available exit, and changed the tire in a nice safe parking lot.

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While on the topic of must have equipment for towing, the battery impact gun is a MUST! but also have a few spare lug nuts in the bag with the gun for that "just in case moments" as well as a pair of good leather gloves, things get pretty hot. I also keep two flares and a flashlight in the bag as well and test everything before i leave

 

I agree with the torsion bar suspension, I ordered a rather cheap trailer but I did order it with the heaviest rated Dexter Axles I could get. It was advice I was given and it was great! 

 

Good luck 

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, TTR said:

Unique ? While not very accurate, it does appear pretty common.

All too common this year, when "communist" means "3 clicks to the left of me" and "fascist" means "3 clicks to the right of me."   I deplore condemnatory but inaccurate labels on both sides.

 

I've interrogated North Vietnamese Army political officers, and have been in combat against communists, so I think I have a pretty good handle on what "communism" is.

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1 hour ago, Grimy said:

All too common this year, when "communist" means "3 clicks to the left of me" and "fascist" means "3 clicks to the right of me."   I deplore condemnatory but inaccurate labels on both sides.

I agree, except the “all too common” ignorant use of inaccurate/inappropriate labeling has unfortunately existed long before this year, but does seem to have become more amplified recently and likely will lead history to repeat itself, yet again.

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Thank you to everyone for your input--it's very helpful!  I appreciate the good advice.  I had picked up on some of this by talking to some of you in person before or trading personal e-mails with you, and by attending the trailering seminar at the AACA Annual Convention.  I don't recall hearing opinions about a beavertail before, so this discussion has been very helpful.

 

I already have a cordless impact wrench, lug nut socket kit, drive-on ramp to change flat tires, set of tools, etc., that I take with us when towing our car.  (I also gave a cordless impact wrench & lug nut socket set to the friend who lends us his trailer so he'd be prepared.)  Now I just need to buy the trailer to go with the tools.

 

Thanks again everyone!  Be safe and stay healthy.

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One more thing that you should consider is being sure that you have the enclosed lug nuts and not the cheap open end that shows the wheel stud.  The reason is the open studs can rust on and be very difficult to get off.  The enclosed ones eliminate that problem.  I have changed all of the lug nuts out to the enclosed style.  This style.

 

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One of the most commonly overlooked, but IMO, perhaps the most important feature on enclosed (car) trailers can only be discovered/observed by crawling underneath them. Almost everything observed by standing in- or outside of any is of secondary importance and usually just personal preferences.

OTOH, vast majority of people base their purchase decisions of any and all cars, whether new, used, vintage, etc just or mostly on aesthetics and/or emotional perceptions rather than technical features coupled with practicality of intended use.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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Also, other commonly overlooked issues with (occasional use) trailers are same as those with many hobby cars,

i.e. scheduled maintenance, especially chassis/suspension and tire aging, regardless of mileage/usage or lack thereof.

 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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I have a 24' trailer, and cannot recommend E-track enough! I had mine put in the floor the length of the trailer, and I can tie down anything!

I've moved garage stuff that the moving company wouldn't take, along with my Packard, and the e-track gives great flexibility.


Also -  totally agree on the torsion axles. My bumper pull car trailer on torsion axles, even without an equalizing hitch, pulls nicer than my fifth wheel rv with leaf springs.

Edited by Ken_P (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

My 1996 Wells Cargo Auto hauler with beaver tail and ramp door is built like a tank.  I have carelessly hit the bottom rear driving into and out of steep gas station driveways and it has suffered no damage. It does not happen very often because the driveway must be quite steep.

The beaver tail makes  loading and unloading all cars, especially low sports cars, much easier .

In addition to the other excellent suggestions here, I will second the motion that it should have a driver side door to allow you to get the car door fully open. Without the driver side door, you can barely get the door of a big '50s or '60s car open.  If you are lucky, you will be able to barely squeeze your way out.

It should be serviced before long trips to help avoid problems on the road. Brakes, bearings, electrical connections, lights.

I carry two spare tires, just in case I run through a construction zone in the middle of nowhere.

A tire pressure monitor system will alert you to tire problems.

Don't tow with a tow vehicle smaller than a 2500 pound pickup or suburban.  I tow with a motorhome and the dual rear axle provides great stability.

Equalizer bars and an anti-sway control system are musts, even on a motorhome.

A maximum speed of 65 to 70 mph is a comfortable speed and about as fast as you will want to drive so long as you have loaded the trailer properly with sufficient tongue weight.  If you load the trailer with low tongue weight, the rig will wander back and forth and you will scare the hell out of yourself, at which time you will stop, move the car forward and increase the tongue weight.  I travel with about 1,100 pounds of tongue weight and it trailers straight and solid. The tow vehicle and trailer should be level.

A CDL is not required for a 12,000 pound trailer here in Illinois or in most states that I am aware of.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Best regards and good luck.

 

Ed Leed

 

 

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One more interesting item........a Dexter 7k and 8K axel are the same, only the magnet on the brakes are different......IE stronger..........thus, when you ever do brake work, replace your 7k magnets with 8K.........direct fit, and more braking power.

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"Quality manufacturers weld the cut & then plate both sides of the area making that spot probably the Strongest part of the frame!"

 

 I modified a trailer that has 6"channel iron main beams by installing  a beavertail .

 I notched the back 5' and welded it using fish plate for strength.

 I also installed curved  plates on the rear to reduce friction when scraping the bottom on steep driveways. 

 The beavertail allows me to carry shorter (and lighter) ramps to drive up on.

IMG_0401.JPG

IMG_0402.JPG

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Mark - you mentioned you were looking at Intech trailers.  I have to say it's the best trailer I've ever owned.  I had a 24 foot Vintage, then a 28 foot Pace for many years and towed them up and down the east coast.  When it was time to get another, I wanted to go back to a 24 foot, so I did all the comparisons and settled on an Intech.  Didn't want to wait months to have one built, so I purchased one from a dealer that was almost identical to what I would have ordered.  Upgraded the sides from .030 to .040, full aluminum floor, huge escape door and no lower cabinets since I don't carry much in the trailer (full width upper cabinets are fine).  It's thousands of pounds lighter than my steel trailer but it's solid as a rock.  Another Intech owner told me "look at the welds and look at the caulk lines".  They're perfect.  You can tell the people who built it know what they're doing.  Another plus - when I wanted to mount a spare tire inside I asked about where the strongest point would be and they said on the wide part of the framing at the rear -- then sent me photos of my trailer under construction.  Tell them your serial number and they can pull up photos of it being built, which answered my question.  Not sure anybody else can do that.  To your comment about a beavertail - the trailer has it, plus a pair of steel rollers at the rear but it hasn't dragged yet.  It pulls easily behind a Ram 3500 SRW, much easier than the steel Pace.  Also better in a crosswind with the slight spread to the axles.  This is one of the Lite series, their basic model, but it's still got plenty of options and the aluminum floor is easy to keep clean.  Good luck with the purchase - I wish I had done it years ago.

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On 8/13/2020 at 3:58 PM, BSoto said:

Mark - you mentioned you were looking at Intech trailers.  I have to say it's the best trailer I've ever owned.  I had a 24 foot Vintage, then a 28 foot Pace for many years and towed them up and down the east coast.  When it was time to get another, I wanted to go back to a 24 foot, so I did all the comparisons and settled on an Intech.  Didn't want to wait months to have one built, so I purchased one from a dealer that was almost identical to what I would have ordered.  Upgraded the sides from .030 to .040, full aluminum floor, huge escape door and no lower cabinets since I don't carry much in the trailer (full width upper cabinets are fine).  It's thousands of pounds lighter than my steel trailer but it's solid as a rock.  Another Intech owner told me "look at the welds and look at the caulk lines".  They're perfect.  You can tell the people who built it know what they're doing.  Another plus - when I wanted to mount a spare tire inside I asked about where the strongest point would be and they said on the wide part of the framing at the rear -- then sent me photos of my trailer under construction.  Tell them your serial number and they can pull up photos of it being built, which answered my question.  Not sure anybody else can do that.  To your comment about a beavertail - the trailer has it, plus a pair of steel rollers at the rear but it hasn't dragged yet.  It pulls easily behind a Ram 3500 SRW, much easier than the steel Pace.  Also better in a crosswind with the slight spread to the axles.  This is one of the Lite series, their basic model, but it's still got plenty of options and the aluminum floor is easy to keep clean.  Good luck with the purchase - I wish I had done it years ago.

 

Hello BSoto,

 

    Thank you very much for the feedback.  It's good to hear from someone who owns an Intech and has experience with them.  I think I'm going to end up doing the same thing you did--buy one off the lot.  The dealer I'm talking to has several on the lot that are pretty much what I want.  Yes, they each probably have a couple options I don't really need/want and there are one or two options I'd like to add, but like you I don't want to wait 3-4 months to have one built (and I'm not sure I'd get the same discount if I order one instead of take one off the lot).  I've looked at Intechs at the Charlotte AutoFair and they definitely are well built.

 

    One thing I'm still trying to decide is whether to go pick it up (it's about 500 miles away) or have it delivered.  I need to purchase a hitch, leveling bars, and sway bar.  The dealer says I need to have plates for the leveling bars welded to the tonque.  I need to find out if the plates are in a standard location on the tongue or if they have to be lined up with my tow vehicle (so can the dealer weld them on before the trailer is delivered or do I need to drive down and have it down at the dealership).

 

    One other thing I need to figure out is where to mount a second spare.  The dealer said you can't add a second mount after the trailer leaves the factory because there's a mounting plate behind the wall.  (I understand that, but can't believe you can't add a mounting bracket afterward to one of the wall frames/studs.  I'd prefer the spares be mounted low, in the front under the top wall cabinet--like you, don't want/need a floor cabinet.  I'm getting too old to be lifting the spare above my shoulders to mount on the bracket up high on the rear wall framing.)

 

    Thanks again!  You're info is very helpful and very reassuring.

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9 hours ago, Mark McAlpine said:

 One other thing I need to figure out is where to mount a second spare.  The dealer said you can't add a second mount after the trailer leaves the factory because there's a mounting plate behind the wall.  (I understand that, but can't believe you can't add a mounting bracket afterward to one of the wall frames/studs.  I'd prefer the spares be mounted low, in the front under the top wall cabinet--like you, don't want/need a floor cabinet.  I'm getting too old to be lifting the spare above my shoulders to mount on the bracket up high on the rear wall framing.) 

 

Mark,

 

Two of my spares are mounted upright (vertically) at floor level - essentially rolled into place, and attached to the side walls of the wedged and tapered nose of my All-Aluminum trailer. Mine is a 24 ft box with a 4-1/2 ft tapered/wedged nose to help minimize wind resistance. It is also a foot taller to accommodate early cars without having to lower the top,

BUT is built higher over the pair of 6,000 lb 8-lug axles, so the wheel boxes are only 4 or so inches in height - a 1950s car's doors can open over the wheelbox, and over the ledge of the driver-side access door which is built awning style to raise and be held open on gas-charged struts.

 

While the length of equalizer bars tends to be somewhat universal, ask to have the entire length of the tongue area reinforced. forearmed is forewarned, and a few extra bucka for safety is never a bad idea

 

Good luck with your decision

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I would agree with Marty - mounting at floor level vertically on the front wall is a good solution and keeps the weight low and forward in the trailer. Easy to have the dealer add or you can do it yourself.  The Intech has 16” studs in the wall, so there’s lots of places to attach them.  For the leveling bars, you would need to have those done with the bars in hand so the person can add the plates in the proper spot.  Still, if you’re just picking it up and towing it home without a car in it, your unloaded weight is probably around 3500 pounds.  Not sure what you’re towing it with but it would probably make the trip fine without bars.  You mentioned Charlotte - I’m in NC as well, if I can offer any more assistance let me know.

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I have e-track in the pointy nose of Fugly, my tall trailer, and stack two spares flat, one on top of the other, on the left side of the pointy nose, secured by an axle strap attached to the e-track.  There's still room to add light stuff (car cover, etc) on top.  No mods, virtually no expense.

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 When mounting a spare tire, it is importaint to REMEMBER HOW TO REMOVE IT WHEN THE TRAILER IS FULLY LOADED.

 A friend mounted his in the front, and when he had a flat, he had to unload almost everthing in order to get at it.

 Some times you carry more than just a car.

 I have mine loaded in the front "A" frame of the trailer on one, and on the other trailer, it is mounted on the front wall outside.

 You could cover them if you like.

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I have several spares in boxes on the floor under the car.......the tires of last resort. I also have three in the back of my pick up bed. NOT a fourth, so I I get a flat I. just pull it off with the electric impact gun, and toss it in the back so I can get off the road and into a safe parking lot. NEVER change a tire on the side of the road if you don't have to.......thats why I like the triple axel set up.

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12 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

 

While the length of equalizer bars tends to be somewhat universal, ask to have the entire length of the tongue area reinforced. forearmed is forewarned, and a few extra bucka for safety is never a bad idea

 

 

Thanks, Marty, I appreciate the advice.

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12 hours ago, BSoto said:

I would agree with Marty - mounting at floor level vertically on the front wall is a good solution and keeps the weight low and forward in the trailer. Easy to have the dealer add or you can do it yourself.  The Intech has 16” studs in the wall, so there’s lots of places to attach them.  For the leveling bars, you would need to have those done with the bars in hand so the person can add the plates in the proper spot.  Still, if you’re just picking it up and towing it home without a car in it, your unloaded weight is probably around 3500 pounds.  Not sure what you’re towing it with but it would probably make the trip fine without bars.  You mentioned Charlotte - I’m in NC as well, if I can offer any more assistance let me know.

 

Thanks for the info and offer, BSoto--I appreciate it.  I'm probably purchasing it from RPM Trailers in Braselton, GA.  (They're the company that usually has a display at the Charlotte AutoFair.)  They have a great selection of trailers in stock, have been helpful in answering questions, and were informative and friendly when I spoke with them in Charlotte.

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11 hours ago, Grimy said:

I have e-track in the pointy nose of Fugly, my tall trailer, and stack two spares flat, one on top of the other, on the left side of the pointy nose, secured by an axle strap attached to the e-track.  There's still room to add light stuff (car cover, etc) on top.  No mods, virtually no expense.

 

Thanks, Grimy--I appreciate it.

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57 minutes ago, Roger Walling said:

 When mounting a spare tire, it is importaint to REMEMBER HOW TO REMOVE IT WHEN THE TRAILER IS FULLY LOADED.

 A friend mounted his in the front, and when he had a flat, he had to unload almost everthing in order to get at it.

 Some times you carry more than just a car.

 I have mine loaded in the front "A" frame of the trailer on one, and on the other trailer, it is mounted on the front wall outside.

 You could cover them if you like.

 

Thanks, Roger--I appreciate the input and agree.  I've seen trailers with the spare tire in a covered box in the floor, which definitely frees up space, but isn't practical for accessing the spare tire when you need it.

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6 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I have several spares in boxes on the floor under the car.......the tires of last resort. I also have three in the back of my pick up bed. NOT a fourth, so I I get a flat I. just pull it off with the electric impact gun, and toss it in the back so I can get off the road and into a safe parking lot. NEVER change a tire on the side of the road if you don't have to.......thats why I like the triple axel set up.

 

Thanks, Edinmass.  I agree--need to have the spare tires easily and quickly available and need to be in a safe place to change them.  The times I've towed a car trailer or Airstream trailer, I've always carried a cordless impact wrench, lug nut kit, drive-on tire change ramp, and torque wrench.  (After reading other comments elsewhere in the Towing Forum, I'm going to start carrying extra lug nuts, too.)

 

My first experience changing a tire on a car trailer was on my way back home from Charlotte.  Fortunately, it was just north of Charlotte where there was a extremely wide stretch of paved shoulder.  A friend & his wife were also towing a trailer behind my wife & I (we were in convoy back to Tidewater), saw the blowout, and pulled over to help us.  It was like a NASCAR pit crew in action.  I got out the drive-on ramp, pulled the good tire onto it so the bad tire was off the ground, and as I used the cordless impact wrench to remove the bad tire my friend got the spare tire out of my trailer, then put the bad tire in the trailer as I mounted the spare.  All told, we were off the road less than 10 minutes. 

 

Thank you and everyone else on this thread for your suggestions and advice!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have open trailer with a beaver tail. I love it i would never  consider buying without a beaver tail. It like a longer ramp. And the beaver tail gives you a taller/ longer drop down ramp door too. A win win . 

Edited by Joe Block (see edit history)
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