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Color of ‘41 wheel wells


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Thought I’d clean up and paint more of my under carriage. Are the back sides of the fenders supposed to be body color or black? My rears are body color but I think would look better black. Any ideas?

thanks,

peter

FBDA7D17-230D-4694-ABAC-1B48D97E053F.jpeg

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I’m interested in this answer. Process would have me believe it would be body color since there would be extra effort to mask the area during initial paint then assembly  

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What Ken says seems to make the most sense to me.  For what it's worth, I took a look through Bill Anderson's "Restoration Facts 1941 Buick" book, and couldn't find any reference to the color of the back sides of the fenders.  

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Also going mostly from gut feelings, I think the areas in the rear wheelwell that are part of the body should probably be body color. I would also suspect that the insides of the fenders were body color simply from a simplicity standpoint--why mask and take two steps to paint an area that won't even be visible? Most likely just all painted body color at the same time. The insides of the fenders might even just be primer with some body color overspray. Again, just speculating but if I were manufacturing a car, that's how I'd do it, even if the colored paint was slightly more expensive than black. That said, it also wouldn't be unusual for someone along the line to shoot some undercoating in there, even the dealer. I checked the photos I have of the various '41 Buicks I've had and don't have any clear shots of the rear inner fender area so I can't say for certain what it should have been (I'm out of town, or else I'd go look at that '40 Super convertible, which is a Jenkins car). There's also the possibility that dark cars were done one way and light-colored cars were maybe done with black--it might look odd to see a bright fenderwell behind the rear tire. I don't know.

 

I agree with you, Peter, and think doing it all in satin black would be a safe choice, an attractive look, and I bet few judges would know the difference.

 

However, I do know for a fact that the inner fenders up front (shown below) were painted low-gloss black, and I believe this is mentioned in the Anderson book. This is my Century when I disassembled it. I don't know how they ended up green, but that whole inner fender should be low-gloss black, as should the frame.

 

LF_inner_sheetmetal.JPG

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21 minutes ago, Bloo said:

What was the color of the Century?

 

 

Original color was black with gray top. But when I started stripping it down, I found some kind of putty beige, bright green, and black primer, which is what it was wearing when I bought it. No idea where that olive green color came from on the inner panels; it was only on those splash aprons.

 

Passenger_Side_Wide.jpg

 

You can sort-of see the awful bright green that was under the primer in this shot (this green did not match the green on the inner fenders):

Door2.jpg

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Thanks boys for your comments. Since you can’t see the inner fenders, I think I’ll just clean them up and leave them as is - faded body color. The fenders do have separate inside splash guards/pans that are visible and I’ll paint them black along with the frame and wheels. 

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6 hours ago, valk said:

...I have a tendency to extend projects for as long as I can ...

No way!

 

it makes sense that the splash pans would be black, again using production logic, those parts would be applied to every car with way too much effort to paint to match. 

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Again in restoring to factory can be an issue. I know as working at the Lincoln-Mercury dealer in 1973 and subsequently at Oldsmobile and Buick dealers in the Monongahela valley area every new car off the truck had some body color overspray inside fender wells. (I know Pizzica Buick had cars undercoated back in the 1940s.) It did not matter because the dealer pushed undercoating on every vehicle sold. (We were heavy in the "Salt Belt"). You had to order the car specifying no undercoating by the dealer. Many chose to send their cars to "Ziebart" for rustproofing. Sedney Oldsmobile where I worked at in 1974-1976 had their own system of rust proofing We drilled 3/4" diameter holes around the doors and jambs. Using a long wand, sprayed some waxy pink slime inside all the enclosed areas. Then there were plastic plugs to snap in. At the time I was the new/used car prep and detail guy. Guess who had to clean up all the overspray!

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41 minutes ago, neil morse said:

This is what the Bill Anderson  book says about undercoating:

 

 

I had my hands on a 1940 Roadmaster coupe that had never been in the hands of a restorer and which had undercoating.  The article you share Neil is consistent with what I saw on the car but with a bit more clarification.  The applicator did not spray hard to reach areas so he missed the floor boards above the muffler and didn't spray under the rockers.  The material I saw was sort of thin, not thick like the 60's applied tar.  I just ordered this book based on your reference in another of your posts.  In talking to Bill, many of the details will be similar between the 40 and the 41 which is the target year for the book.  (Thanks again Neil)

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