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We’re Pretty Small...Be Careful Out There!


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A lot of Amish these days use small, battery-operated lights for specific jobs.  My upholstery guy is 83 and has one that straps to his head for close work.  They may have a solar generator or (if they have a lot of high-power machinery) a diesel generator.  The big no-no seems to be the use of the power grid, followed by the use of electric gadgets like washing machines or air conditioning to make life too easy or comfortable.

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Also seems to depend on the community leaders in regards to whats allowed and how established the family is.

We had a family that bought a house and farm outside a neighboring town. They lived in the house for about two years

One day I was surprised to find the house gone and an excavator sitting where the house use to be. 

 

They then built a new house in the typical Amish style used up here. My wife and I joked that that light switch

on the wall must of been just a bit too tempting. Jokes aside, I enjoy having them as neighbors and friends.

A lot of long dormant farm land is back in production and whenever I need help they are more than willing.

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22 hours ago, padgett said:

ps I believe in the US (any states different ?) a buggy on a public road must have a red triangle in the rear.

When I bought my first prewar car in 2009 one of the first things I bought at Tractor Supply was this orange triangle. I still use it today on my 34 Chevy.

DSCF1104.JPG

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Most Amish in my area of PA are using LED lights on buggies and most everywhere else light is needed.  Our local PBS station from Hershey did a report on rehabbing old barns into new uses.  One thing they highlighted was the addition of solar energy to the barns and that the best companies to use for solar are owned and run by Amish businessmen.

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I wasn’t going to post it, but this is one of my favorite pictures.

(1935 Cadillac V-16 next to what [the error ridden book that didn’t bother to cite the source so I won’t bother to cite it] only described as a ‘small English G.M. sedan’.)

Probably a G.M. publicity shot.

14633755-3308-4673-BE69-58BD1CEAED88.jpeg

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  • 5 weeks later...
13 hours ago, keithb7 said:

Same car as post #1. My old Plymouth looks huge beside these cars! 
 


 

 

DF67D72D-5177-4AE5-A1D1-4E432137AF58.jpeg

Definitely standing tall but about the same length as those short wheelbase pony cars. I love the narrow width of my 34 Chevy as I can work all around it in the garage with room to spare.

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40 minutes ago, padgett said:

Amazing how big the modern pony cars are. A Challenger (198") is  longer than my CTS DD (189") and even longer than my Grand Cherokee (190")

My wife has a 2014 mustang convertible. Although it seems like a smallish car, parked beside my 77 trans am, it is noticeably larger.

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20 hours ago, TAKerry said:

My wife has a 2014 mustang convertible. Although it seems like a smallish car, parked beside my 77 trans am, it is noticeably larger.

The modern Challenger was built on the Chrysler 300 platform and it is enormous. Really noticeable if if you see one parked next to a real 70s Challenger. 

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