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'34 Packard Starter problem SOLVED !


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Some of you have been following our ordeal with a '34  Packard 12 starter.   Believe it or not the problem was with the type brushes the rebuilder used.  When the rebuilder received the starter it had carbon brushes in it so he replaced them with new carbon brushes.  This time when we returned the starter we sent along a Standard 8 starter for reference.  The rebuilder noticed the Standard starter had brushes that were a carbon/copper mix.  He replaced the carbon brushes with new brushes with a similar carbon/copper mix and they made all the difference. Starter works great now and the 12 is running as I type. Thanks to everyone for the tips and advice. 

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Only one happier than us is the owner. He paid big bucks for this car 4 months ago and has yet to actually see it in person.  We will put 30-50 miles on it and if nothing else turns up we will deliver it.  Beautiful car.

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51 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

He replaced the carbon brushes with new brushes with a similar carbon/copper mix and they made all the difference.

Thanks for that info that I was totally unaware of.   Hopefully others will remember that if we ever run into this situation on prewars ourselves.

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41 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

Only one happier than us is the owner. He paid big bucks for this car 4 months ago and has yet to actually see it in person.  We will put 30-50 miles on it and if nothing else turns up we will deliver it.  Beautiful car.

 

 

Drive it like you stole it!............why not.....it's a customer car! 🤫

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Happily we are in an industrial park and we can drive it almost a mile without ever actually getting out on the hiway.  Son just took me for a ride and the car performs very nicely.  Trans is absolutely silent, the temp stays around 160-180,  the brakes work very well and the oil pressure is good.  I'm impressed,  especially since it was an auction car.  Still shaking my head over that starter. 

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17 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

 Still shaking my head over that starter. 

Usually happens like that - a relatively easy and/or inexpressive repair matched to 80 hours of time to deal with it.  

The good news it was NOT a "Oh S- - T we are going to need another of those unobtainium parts as this one is toast. 

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Congrats on getting it solved, and another thanks for the follow up.  

 

I've seen those copper/carbon brushes in starters, but never would have figured they make such a difference over plain carbon.  It makes sense when thinking about the conductivity of copper and how much current a starter draws.

 

Paul

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I mean that I have known of the two types (carbon and carbon/copper) of brushes for a long time now. And I have known of several advantages and disadvantages of each. But I have never run into that much of a difference in working results. Quite interesting.

 

7 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Usually happens like that - a relatively easy and/or inexpressive repair matched to 80 hours of time to deal with it.  

The good news it was NOT a "Oh S- - T we are going to need another of those unobtainium parts as this one is toast. 

 

Most of my working career was in cutting edge technology and communication systems. We sometimes had search and repair projects that we could spend several days finding the problem (my dad was a master at this, an incredible mind for electrical and electronic functions and failures!). On new technologies, often the problem would turn out to be some unanticipated electrical stress failure that the designing engineers had not considered. Often the repair bill would be way into the hundreds, and sometimes thousands of dollars, to identify the problem, but only about five dollars cost for a couple common electronic components. Customers often didn't understand, The common joke (not just us!) in the industry was to say: "Cost of transistor is $5, two years college in electronic theory plus ten years practical experience to gain the knowledge of where to attach the transistor is $1500."

For an engine starter it wouldn't have quite the same effect, but we also often told customers that we could hand them a new transistor for $5, and they could figure out where to put it (double entendre intended). All they usually had to do was look at a circuit board with a couple hundred components on it that they know NOTHING about, and they would get a bit more understanding.

 

Thank you for the update!

Edited by wayne sheldon
Got interrupted again, forgot to close (see edit history)
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I never would have guessed that carbon/copper brushes make such a difference on improving starter performance. Thanks for letting us know.  

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