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Determining the correct window channel? 1930 DeSoto


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Before installing the interior door panels it would seem like a good idea to replace the old plate glass with safety glass. A lot of the window channel needs to be updated first. I haven't taken the window trim off yet but am wondering how to tell which is the correct channel to use. Some of the original channel has short steel inserts that the glass runs in. What's the purpose for this and is it necessary. 20200710_155055.thumb.jpg.f996cf13e7d7b84af9fe7a66fea70097.jpgSee phot

 

It looks like there is supposed to be more of this channel running across the top. Was this glued in there? 

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Thanks for your help. 

 

Edited by Fossil (see edit history)
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I have changed thee out a few times over the years.

I had my local glass shop order them for me.

There are several profiles and finishes.

I am quite sure I have seen these profiles somewhere online as well.

Thickness of the glass, radius of bends, trim finish (some are just black and some have a stainless trim) etc. have to be taken into account.

I borrowed an adhesive gun from said glass shop that was a battery powered thing and the adhesive was VERY sticky and could be quite messy if you let it.

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Those metal channels puzzle me.  The whole purpose of the felt lined channel is to cushion the glass.  It seems the metal channel defeats the purpose.  My 32 Dodge Brothers has steel channel below in the door that the felt channel fits in, but nothing like your setup.

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They puzzle me also and the glass shop I visited thought the car would get along nicely without them. I can't for the life of me figure out why they would be in there. 

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3 hours ago, Taylormade said:

Are they bolted in or welded on?

If your talking about the steel inserts they are just slipped snuggly into the channel. This is what they look like and there is only two left on the car. There are two small tits sticking out on each side to hold it in place in the channel. Had to use a needle nose pliers to remove and it is 4" long.

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20200712_182418.jpg

Edited by Fossil (see edit history)
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Take a look at Restoration Specialties web catalog. They carry many types of window channel and it is listed by size. there may have been a top channel but in some early cars , only rubber bumpers or a rubber seal was used. most of these channels were a friction fit with the inner garnish moldings holding them in place. Sometimes there will be clips or other fasteners to hold the channel. RS carries a lot of the hardware too. I have no idea what those metal channels are, who knows , they may not even be part of the car. Judging by the gap between the molding and channel, it appears that the channel in you car may not be correct for the application.The metal channels may have been covered at one time or installed to take up slack in the channel to keep the window from rattleling. It's important to make sure you are using the right size channel. never assume, that just because a part is on your car that it's original. I would think that that car would use RS's no. 2-c Channel (9/16 h x 5/8 w.) felt lined or no. 3-C-1 channel (9/16 h x 5/8 w) pile lined channel. You can request free samples.

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