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1930 Cadillac V-16 Limousine (not mine)


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For a 7P car, that one has great proportions! Very handsome. Temptation would be to leave it as-is, but I suspect it's worse than it appears.

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18 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

For a 7P car, that one has great proportions! Very handsome. Temptation would be to leave it as-is, but I suspect it's worse than it appears.

 

 

Yup........except the price is twice what it should be for an asking number.

 

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, B Jake Moran said:

Twice what it should be for a 16 cylinder car?

 

Yup...in that condition....look at the sale in Arizona from January and tell me what you think. A MUCH better car, turn key for 60.

 

The market on 4 door sedans is NOT static.........

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Some people  are just to negative its money or history, not leaving  with one or  the other, I guess  the  ones  worried about the cost,you  are upside  down  on any car.dealer as well,so price  is negotiable. 

Edited by old car fan (see edit history)
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Its not a worry about cost but where do you want to spend your money.   Most of us do not have infinite resources so we have a choice of cars to spend our money on.  Moderately rich people do the same thing.  Many/ Most people are rich are that way because they know the value of a dollar. 

Now tell me,  if someone handed you 95,000, Would you not look around , or would this car be the best car you liked most and plunk it down in a heartbeat.  I would hazard a guess that you would look around a bit.  Lots of cars on the market right now and many more will be. 

The fact I like Auburns but look at almost everything with wheels and can be happy with many other years and makes really makes old cars alot more fun and the thrill of the hunt even better. 

 

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I relate it to Hershey last year.  I had 30G at my disposal to buy a car after I had sold my 40 Ford.  I really wanted to buy something.  Rarely do the planets align to be cashed up at Hershey.  I looked all over and stumbled on the first day across one of my Bucket list cars.  That super nice little 32 Plymouth 3 window coupe.  They were asking I think 24G or something so it was right in my budget.  I was all over it,  under it,  you name it.  Several times and I still walked.  It was a great little super clean car,  turn key,  in a good color and very reasonably priced, especially after the seller came down some.  Sometimes working on the 51 Dodge roadster I bought after Hershey I look back and half wish I had bought the Plymouth,  but holding out,  buying the cheaper Dodge (as I really wanted a Convertible) I had enough when the time came to buy the Auburn when it came on the Market. So it's all about choices and there are alot of choice to be had in many price ranges. 

I thin I made the right choice.

In the end it would have been this or the 32 Plymouth Coupe as I didn't have the resources to buy both.

 

IMG_1454.JPG

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Anyone who has 50-100k to spend on a sedan today has twenty five times more options than five years ago. In ten more years, it will be two hundred times more options. I always try and buy good cars.......which means price is the second or third thing to consider after I determine the car is acceptable to me. I rather overpay for a good or great car, then get a deal on a mess. I’m getting older........which means I have less time to fix and restore things, and hopefully a bit wiser every year also. I think comparing a dealer offered car to a recent public sale is fair game. If it were a private seller, I would not have commented.

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7 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

Yup...in that condition....look at the sale in Arizona from January and tell me what you think. A MUCH better car, turn key for 60.

 

The market on 4 door sedans is NOT static.........

 

Which auction do I look this up? Thanks

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Yes, that’s it. Hammer was in the lower mid 60’s. And the car was owned by one of the leading V-16 Cadillac collectors in thr world. It was sorted and ready to tour.

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16 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Temptation would be to leave it as-is, but I suspect it's worse than it appears.

I believe I would do the same, other than perhaps replace the glass that has delaminated.

 

Craig

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V-16 Cadillacs have a huge amount of die cast pot metal..............and it's falling apart now........on every car. Add in a car that has sat, been neglected, needs sorting, and the regular basics..........your gonna dump 40-50 in a car like the one for sale at the top of the thread. Its a fun and rewarding challenge, and hopefully someone takes it on. Getting in is easy.........getting it done is VERY difficult on a 16, and getting out??????? Well we shall not even go there. Example.......I know nothing about the car, but if it needs exhaust manifolds, you're going to spend 30 grand by the time you are done. Bad heads or engine............or internal problems? Buying a V-16 is difficult at best without a budget, and few people understand them anymore, and those of us that do are getting old.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I think we all know that things are not always they way they superficially seem.    The Arizona car was fully sorted by probably the biggest V16 collector in the world.   It was an original car that the new equipment was made to blend in.  Those wheels and tires are new.  The motor and all the mechanics were full sorted for a 500 mile tour.    I'll bet he had over 200k in to the car easy.   It sold pre-corona at one of the biggest, most well attended Classic Car auctions in the world for 70k all in.

 

1931 Cadillac V-16 Seven-Passenger Imperial Sedan by Fleetwood

 

 

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21 minutes ago, rwchatham said:

Way over priced!

 

 

Yup....but a dealer is always fishing, and I'm ok with that. If the car were tour ready and needed nothing, it would be a very fair asking number to start with. I don't know the dealer, but have friends who have done business with him and say he is a good guy. His site sure has a lot of stuff for sale, mostly cars I am not familiar with. It's worth a look.

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2 hours ago, alsancle said:

I think we all know that things are not always they way they superficially seem.    The Arizona car was fully sorted by probably the biggest V16 collector in the world.   It was an original car that the new equipment was made to blend in.  Those wheels and tires are new.  The motor and all the mechanics were full sorted for a 500 mile tour.    I'll bet he had over 200k in to the car easy.   It sold pre-corona at one of the biggest, most well attended Classic Car auctions in the world for 70k all in.

 

1931 Cadillac V-16 Seven-Passenger Imperial Sedan by Fleetwood

 

 

 

How liberating it must be to have new tires whose whitewalls naturally turn brown to match the car!

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18 hours ago, old car fan said:

Some people  are just to negative its money or history, not leaving  with one or  the other, I guess  the  ones  worried about the cost,you  are upside  down  on any car.dealer as well,so price  is negotiable. 

Sounds good - We will use your money to do the project :) 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

How liberating it must be to have new tires whose whitewalls naturally turn brown to match the car!

Yes, those are new tires - the period correct Firestones have not been made for too many years now.  That said - there have been a few bad batches (friends put a set of double whitewalls on their Duesenberg and they went yellow fast - then they damaged the chrome on the trims on a couple trying to replace them and ... - very expensive project).  I would normally suspect a damp garage or sunlight.  And someone said something about not properly cleaning off the blue coating.  Anyway about it though, a huge amount of work to have them go BROWN.  

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I believe I would do the same, other than perhaps replace the glass that has delaminated.

 

Craig

HORRID TASK - incredibly hard to do without re-upholstering car (hundreds of little nails)

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Sidenote:  

The missing window bezels are a bear - hopefully there is a little pile of them in the toolbox.  

Also, the front engine pan and engine pan on the driver's side seem to be missing (that is one complex thing to make and may or may not be reproduced currently), and then oodles and oodles of other diecast (window cranks , door handles, and foot rails immediately come to mind, but if it is die cast and there are another umpteen parts then they are on their way to the garbage can.  

And, agree it is something that better be running and you better be standing next to it running if you are buying it - not a cheap car to do mechanical (or any other) projects on (never was and never will be).

And, that Packard trunk - belongs on a Packard

 

Still leaning toward good deal as dealers usually have some room and it appears a super solid car.  

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56 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Yes, those are new tires - the period correct Firestones have not been made for too many years now.  That said - there have been a few bad batches (friends put a set of double whitewalls on their Duesenberg and they went yellow fast - then they damaged the chrome on the trims on a couple trying to replace them and ... - very expensive project).  I would normally suspect a damp garage or sunlight.  And someone said something about not properly cleaning off the blue coating.  Anyway about it though, a huge amount of work to have them go BROWN.  

 

No, it's a manufacturing defect and a well-known one. I've mentioned it often enough here that I'm no longer permitted to even type the name of the manufacturer anymore, lest I get more stern warnings about pissing off one of the "great pillars of the hobby."


They ALL turn yellow coming from [redacted]. They've worked pretty hard to make it the consumer's fault with that nonsense about improper cleaning and protective coatings and selling a "special whitewall cleaning solution," but there's a reason they gave me six free tires when I complained about mine turning yellow in a matter of days. Of course, the replacements turn yellow even faster, but whatever. Wander around any car show, up to and including Pebble, and you'll see tires from [redacted] turning gray or brown around the outer edges and slowing making its way inward. It's endemic to the manufacturer and a defect in the process because the discoloration comes from behind the whitewall, not external to it.

 

Their incentive to fix it is zero, of course--where else are you going to go for your 19 or 20-inch wide whitewall antique car tires? Suck it, consumers. We're a monopoly so you'll take what we give you and be happy about it.

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43 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

No, it's a manufacturing defect and a well-known one. I've mentioned it often enough here that I'm no longer permitted to even type the name of the manufacturer anymore, lest I get more stern warnings about pissing off one of the "great pillars of the hobby."


They ALL turn yellow coming from [redacted]. They've worked pretty hard to make it the consumer's fault with that nonsense about improper cleaning and protective coatings and selling a "special whitewall cleaning solution," but there's a reason they gave me six free tires when I complained about mine turning yellow in a matter of days. Of course, the replacements turn yellow even faster, but whatever. Wander around any car show, up to and including Pebble, and you'll see tires from [redacted] turning gray or brown around the outer edges and slowing making its way inward. It's endemic to the manufacturer and a defect in the process because the discoloration comes from behind the whitewall, not external to it.

 

Their incentive to fix it is zero, of course--where else are you going to go for your 19 or 20-inch wide whitewall antique car tires? Suck it, consumers. We're a monopoly so you'll take what we give you and be happy about it.

 

Is that pillar also happen to be the only remaining vintage tire manufacturer?   Hopefully the blackwalls hold up.

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Just now, alsancle said:

 

Is that pillar also happen to be the only remaining vintage tire manufacturer?   Hopefully the blackwalls hold up.

 

Actually I was just about to post that there are several of the black tires that turn brown too, it's just that most people don't notice it unless you can see something truly black next to it.  I took photos of such an occurrence recently and will see if I can find it.

 

I had a case with a set of whitewalls where I got the runaround.  It was sunlight, cleaners, etc.  Nope -- tires got mounted, washed off with clear water, and went into a windowless storage building until a period of weeks later it emerged with brownwall tires.

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Armor-All is notorious for turning black rubber brown, but that isn't what's happening with the whitewalls. They do it without any help, as Walter mentions.

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Here we go.  Tire on top has been mounted and inflated.  Lives in the dark for the most part and no cleaners used on it.  Beneath that I put an unused tire from the same source.  For a true black standard you can see the painted wheel peeking out between the two.

 

Just like with the all-white and all-gray tires, the blacks share the interesting trait that they will stay pure until you inflate them.  Once inflated they will turn in a matter of weeks to days and in the case of white tires, deteriorate with cracking (not normal little micro checking) hard spots, etc.

20200710_140139[1].jpg

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John just saying  these  cars need restored,or recomissiqoned, I do not think in this day,there's  no money in  it.its the love of history  and  the cars. Everything  has its place 

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