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1958 Lincoln Premier Landau - $21000 - Montrose, CO - Not Mine


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1958 Lincoln Premier Landau - $21000 - Montrose, CO

https://westslope.craigslist.org/cto/d/montrose-1958-lincoln-premier/7150286663.html

Gorgeous 1958 Lincoln Premier 4 door hardtop, nicely restored, one of the largest cars ever made, well over 5000 lbs of American iron. 430 cubic inch V8 with 375 horsepower. Phone calls only.

Contact: 'show phone number' returns an error message, try it yourself if interested.

Copy and paste in your email: 20c94a193b7d3af78bcf1068843a1d5e@sale.craigslist.org

 

I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1958 Lincoln Premier Landau.

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Historically, it's an interesting car, and it's in a seldom-seen

color for 1958 Lincolns.  However, the styling really is odd.

In that era, stylists wanted to be "different" and really changed

the styling from the well received 1955-56 cars of all makes.

 

The year 1958 produced some unattractive cars, sorry to say.

Ford Motor Company had more than its share:

 

---I don't object to the '58 Ford, but I read accounts from that

    time that dealers got objections to the "vacuum-cleaner" front end.

---The Lincoln really is strange.  Much better when revised for 1959-60.

---The famous Edsel had jokes made about its looks, and reportedly,

     some buyers were actually embarrassed about their purchase.

---The '58 Mercury was bizarre and graceless, too, I think.

 

And to think that in 1956, the Lincoln won awards for its beautiful styling!

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Indeed, the 1958 Lincolns and Continentals are an acquired taste.   My bad taste was formed at six years old when I saw my first '58, instantly smitten...

I know, strange little kid...  

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All I can think when I see it is how much I'd like to have that instrument panel lens that doesn't have the "70 mph" crack in it.

 

All three years offered interesting combinations of style changes and trim features between models.  For '58 I prefer the Premiere and Capri because I think the side trim coming up from the rear does a nice job of balancing the short fender scallop.  To me they look better yet in a two-door.

 

It looks like it was somebody's hot rod with all the chrome on the engine.  Look at that dual master cylinder they put in place of the Treadle Vac.  Is that a hydraulic booster on the back of it?  There are big hoses going to it.

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I recall hearing decades ago that the early '58 Lincolns, because they were unibody, had structural problems. Perhaps it was myth, though, but it was said that if you jacked the front of one of these up with the bumper jack, there was a chance that the windshield could crack because of flex in the body. Do any of you recall ever hearing that?

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1 minute ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

I recall hearing decades ago that the early '58 Lincolns, because they were unibody, had structural problems. Perhaps it was myth, though, but it was said that if you jacked the front of one of these up with the bumper jack, there was a chance that the windshield could crack because of flex in the body. Do any of you recall ever hearing that?

 

I've never read anything official but have heard that early 58's had weld failure issues (though nothing as dramatic as windshields cracking) and I think they mostly overcame it by increasing the number of spot welds.  I don't know of any instances of where they changed joint designs or braced things.  For all the obscure topics they cover, the Service Bulletins are silent on that issue. 

 

My '60 will flex a little when I put it on a typical two-post lift but not so much that I can't still open and close the doors as other non-unibody cars are prone to do. It is important to do a close inspection of the torque boxes if you ever shop for one of these things.  The outside can exhibit little in the way of rust issues even if not repaired yet still have torque box damage.  Several years back there was a huge Lincoln auction and in it a '59 with very poor gaps and horrendous body work.  Looking in the front fender wells there were diagonal pieces of angle iron stuffed where the torque boxes used to be.  Wish I had a digital camera back then.  The irony was all the painted cars were junk and brought ridiculous money and all the good ones were the parts cars in the field out back and sold for $400 bucks each.  It would be interesting to know where that car is today.

 

  

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Not unibody flex but the early '58 430 engines had teething problems.  On raising the front of a '58 Lincoln with a bumper jack, it will deformer badly, never look right no matter how much its straightened.   This '58 looks never to have been jacked up that way.  The '58 front bumper is an assemblage of four pieces, none rugged enough to withstand the weight of the car.

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People must have used them because every bumper I've ever had has evidence of it but it's certainly not anything I would ever attempt.  On the back you have to jack it from the body so the axle will drop or you can't fish the tire out of the wheelwell even with the fender skirt off.

 

Amongst '58 - '60 people there seems to be a line drawn with those who are of the opinion that '58 was the pinnacle of styling and that the next two years they threw in the towel on design to satisfy the critics, and then those who think '59 and '60 are superior because they refined the issues that people didn't like with the '58 by making the lines more subtle.  I've run into the same thing with Toronado people.   One time I was talking to a guy with a beautiful '66 that was going on and on about all the revolutionary design features and when I did no more than mention to him that I have a '67 he just dumped all over it and went on this rant about how Oldsmobile ruined it and should have redesigned the next year entirely.  Everybody has their thing.

 

 

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27 minutes ago, W_Higgins said:

People must have used them because every bumper I've ever had has evidence of it but it's certainly not anything I would ever attempt.  On the back you have to jack it from the body so the axle will drop or you can't fish the tire out of the wheelwell even with the fender skirt off.

 

Amongst '58 - '60 people there seems to be a line drawn with those who are of the opinion that '58 was the pinnacle of styling and that the next two years they threw in the towel on design to satisfy the critics, and then those who think '59 and '60 are superior because they refined the issues that people didn't like with the '58 by making the lines more subtle.  I've run into the same thing with Toronado people.   One time I was talking to a guy with a beautiful '66 that was going on and on about all the revolutionary design features and when I did no more than mention to him that I have a '67 he just dumped all over it and went on this rant about how Oldsmobile ruined it and should have redesigned the next year entirely.  Everybody has their thing.

 

 

W, I've always found it fascinating how seemingly normal guys can get so strident and entrenched in their views about what they feel was/is best regarding autos. I've never seen it come to blows, but if alcohol was added to the mix, I imagine anything is possible. I mean it's not like talking about the Vikings and the Packers, is it?

James Sheehan

MPLS

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5 minutes ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

 I've never seen it come to blows, but if alcohol was added to the mix, I imagine anything is possible. I mean it's not like talking about the Vikings and the Packers, is it?

 

 

I wouldn't know.  Is that one of the games with the round orange ball or the little brown pointy one?  😄

 

What I do know is if you go on the Model T forum and mention the word "Kevlar" you would wish you were wearing it instead of using it on your transmission bands!

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31 minutes ago, W_Higgins said:

Amongst '58 - '60 people there seems to be a line drawn with those who are of the opinion that '58 was the pinnacle of styling and that the next two years they threw in the towel on design to satisfy the critics, and then those who think '59 and '60 are superior because they refined the issues that people didn't like with the '58 by making the lines more subtle. 

 

I've run into the same thing with Toronado people.   One time I was talking to a guy with a beautiful '66 that was going on and on about all the revolutionary design features and when I did no more than mention to him that I have a '67 he just dumped all over it and went on this rant about how Oldsmobile ruined it and should have redesigned the next year entirely.  Everybody has their thing.

 

 

I recall in the 1990's there were a lot of LCOC members that swallowed hard to accept the 1958-'60 models as 'legitimate' for membership in their club.  Of the three model years, the 1958 are the most extravagant and purest expression of the original design intent by John Najjar.   If extravagant can have greater or lesser degrees, the 1959-'60 perhaps a minor amount less so.

 

Regarding the first generation Oldsmobile Toronado, the 1966 is the purest expression of John North's design intent, the 1967 only changed in grille and headlight valance panel detail, which detracted little from the 1966 original.  The 1968-'69 'catcher's mask' frontal restyle is another matter, affectively negated the purity of the original.  The 1970, while attractive,  carries a redesign which could have been applied to the Delta Eighty-Eight, it just doesn't look special or unique.  

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3 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

I recall in the 1990's there were a lot of LCOC members that swallowed hard to accept the 1958-'60 models as 'legitimate' for membership in their club.  Of the three model years, the 1958 are the most extravagant and purest expression of the original design intent by John Najjar.   If extravagant can have greater or lesser degrees, the 1959-'60 perhaps a minor amount less so.

 

Regarding the first generation Oldsmobile Toronado, the 1966 is the purest expression of John North's design intent, the 1967 only changed in grille and headlight valance panel detail, which detracted little from the 1966 original.  The 1968-'69 'catcher's mask' frontal restyle is another matter, affectively negated the purity of the original.  The 1970, while attractive,  carries a redesign which could have been applied to the Delta Eighty-Eight, it just doesn't look special or unique.  

 

At the first LCOC show I attended about 1992 a judge was looking over the '60 Premiere we took and as soon as the front door opened he declared, "This car has been modified with an air duct added to the door panel.  That's not original.  We'll have to deduct for that".  The car was obviously an unrestored original and when I pointed out to him that the unrestored '60 Continental parked next to us had the exact same feature he said, "Well.... it has been modified too."  That moment gave birth to my position that I don't need a "judge" to tell me that he knows less about my cars than I do!

 

What really set off the Toronado guy was when he asked if mine had a vinyl top and I answered in the affirmative.  It must have been appealing to some back in the era, including my grandparents who bought it new!

 

  

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16 minutes ago, W_Higgins said:

That moment gave birth to my position that I don't need a "judge" to tell me that he knows less about my cars than I do! 

 

I agree, Mr. Higgins.  Judging can be helpful, but I 

don't need my cars judged.  I register them with the

"Do Not Judge" box checked.

 

And I like the '67 Toronado's appearance even better than

that of the 1966.  I may think differently from many owners,

but a vinyl roof enhances a Toronado's appearance in

my opinion.

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