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chris_kriner

Steering wheel removal...How?

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OK...Checking off the "To-Do" list, and it is getting shorter! Next Project...How in the world do I go about removing the steering wheel? Or better yet, the horn mechanism? Trying to figure out why I would be getting a slight shock from the horn! Every time I press it, I get a slight ...ok ....a good shock! Very unpleasant surprise let me tell you! Hahahhaha...Ideas? My thoughts are bare or crossed wires in there. Last thing I want to do is damage the wheel in any way. Thanks everyone for your input! 

 

Chris

Edited by chris_kriner (see edit history)

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

The horn ring should have small plastic tabs on the 3 points where it contacts the horn ring on the steering wheel.  They are probably worn off, and when they 'short' the horn circuit to operate it you're probably getting some inductive sparks that you will feel when you push on the horn ring.  You need to look at an exploded view in the parts book that shows you the horn switch assembly and order any bad or missing parts.  As to getting the steering wheel off, there's a nut on the end of the steering shaft that holds the wheel on it.  Remove the nut and gently tap on the base of the steering wheel to nudge it upward.  It is keyed to the shaft.  Knobsoup will rebuild your steering wheel with new plastics if it's defective.  His name is Keith Lee, and he's a club member.  Horn parts should be available from Boos Harrel or other suppliers if you need them.  

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Thanks Ray500! The wheel is in great shape. I figured something is touching that shouldn't be touching. 

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Update.....I found out how to do what I was trying to do. All I needed to do was grab the Horn mechanism part (Chrome circle with center cap that reads "Lincoln Twelve") at the 1 O'clock position and the 7 o'clock position and twist. It will pop off and expose the Spring and what nots.... 

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The wire in the steering column should be a resistance wire. What you are feeling is the voltage from the coil of the horn relay when it drops out. You can install a 1 ohm resister between the horn ring wire and the horn relay to reduce the back voltage enough so you won't get a shock. If that doesn't work, try connecting a capacitor from the horn relay terminal with the ring wire to ground. The value should not matter much.

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19tom40 I am not getting a shock all the time. Only when I go to press the horn... Here Is a Pic of it. I dont think its suppose to look like this! Already in talks with Chris at Boo's for new screw insulators and formed "Sponge" seal....

lincolnwheel.jpg

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I see that the rubber pad (P/N 26H-3672) is supposed to isolate the ring from ground so that you would not get a shock.

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And you need to clean up the rust and corrosion in the horn button parts so you get good clean connections once you put it back together.  Good clean electrical connections are important!   Insulators need replacing also.  Good luck!

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