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1926 Chevy. Not a Buick but need a little guidance


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Most of you know I am a Buick guy.  I have recently acquired a 1926 Chevy.  A restoration was started on this car 28+ years ago. I am still putting it together, have all of the wiring harness hooked up and am trying to get it to fire.

The points are not sparking when I break them. i have voltage.  Isn’t there supposed to be a condenser in the distributor?  Or this early of a car didn’t require it.  
Thanks a million guys. Here is a few pictures

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Matt,

That is a nice looking little Chevrolet.  You need to get with Pinky Randall.  That's 'Mr. Chevrolet' to everyone else.  He is listed in the AACA Membership Directory.  I believe he is in Houghton Lake, Michigan.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Posted (edited)

There HAD to be a condenser SOMEWHERE. I don't know if it was inside or outside the distributor. If you don't have one that will make it not run.

 

It's hard to see what is happening in there from the pic. The point with the wire attached has to be insulated from ground somehow. The other point is grounded. The wire should go hot/not-hot as the distributor turns.

 

I'll bet the condenser hung on the outside.

 

P.S. They know these 4 cylinder Chevies inside out on http://vccachat.org

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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Beautiful car.  

Here is a distributor schematic.  This applies to all vehicles with points.  Hang it on the coil if you like but you have to ground the condensor to the body or the engine.  That's why they are in the distributor or on the side.  It is an easy ground.  People complain about a bad condensor all the time.  No condensor falls in the same category.  The 6 volt coil in my 1925 Buick  has a 1930 Buick condensor because that is the one they can find at the auto parts store, and it is a couple dollars.     Hugh

 127200835_distributorschematic.JPG.38fc3596b4ad806bc6da67d994faba23.JPG

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While you are at it, put an ohm meter on the yellow wire, and ground the other side of the ohm meter on the housing.  Open and close the points (you can use a screwdriver across the contact points) and ensure that you get an open circuit when the points are open, and a closed circuit when you cross the points.  Just to rule out that all the insulators on those old parts are working.  

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