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Help decoding my 1936 Chrysler Airstream C8 Body ID Firewall Tag


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Hi,

 

I have exhausted every online and personal source I have to decode this body ID tag for my 1936 Chrysler.  Can someone help guide me on decoding this ID tag?

Here are the things I understand:

 

C8CC indicates that I have a C8 Chrysler Convertible

1069 is the body sequence number?

104 = ? (Is this the paint code, and if so, what color is this?)

482 = ? (Is this the interior code, and if so, what interior should I have?)

DG = ? (Some option I assume, but I have no idea what option)

6WH = Dual side mount wheels

Job Number = ?  (Are these just some internal codes?_

 

Thanks so much in advance!

E8CA1238-ED0B-4707-9549-264A0FBE80B4.jpeg

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

Joe,

 

   What a difference a year makes! My '35 tag clearly identifies which codes are which (CZ 4 door Touring, trim code is DG for Deluxe). I guess in '36, the layout changed (see what I mean in the picture).  I looked at my Dupont color charts for '36 Chrysler cars, and I see your car could be "Kiltie Green" or "Polo Green Metallic" though I doubt it is "Kiltie Green" as the fenders are supposed to be partially black if that were the case. What is curious though is the paint codes for these colors (309, 311, 312, 313) do not show up on your tag.  So the mystery deepens a little! On mine, paint code 213 corresponds to Viennese Blue which is correct for 1935. 

 

 I scanned that 1936 page here also, take a look, sorry it's an old book and the scan quality is poor. Hope this helps somewhat, and what a great car you have!

 

Greg

img3496_21442.jpg

Body Tag.jpg

Edited by SuperJonas (see edit history)
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Thanks so much Jonas!  You likely cleared up one code: DG. My convertible is a deluxe, so the DG stands probably stands for deluxe. 482 represents leather, but it was a code that was not associated with a specific leather color.  The paint is indeed polo green metallic (the firewall paint is original) but like you, I cannot locate a color that matches the number on my body tag.  We are getting close!  The DG is a big find for me.  Thank you so much!

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  • 2 months later...

Another update... code 1xx is black for Chrysler for the years surrounding 1936, but is not listed as black for 1936.  I find it difficult to believe that Chrysler made palm green (the apparent color of my car) coded 104 for 1936 and black for all other years.  It is important to note that all greens are  coded 3xx for 1934-1937 (and probably other years).

 

I need to find a location on my car that would never have been painted and verify the color.... now to figure out where that location might be.

 

Oh the joy.  LOL.

 

Joe

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So..... I walk out to my car and find a location where the paint was cracking (several places on the front fender) and taking a knife point, lift the edge of one of the cracks... a large piece of paint lifted off.  Underneath?  The original black paint, scuffed up lightly, but with the original patina.  I am going to life the paint in a few other locations just to see what the original paint looks like underneath.  I will take some images and post them here.

 

Color code 104 = Black paint

Interior code 482 = Red leather interior

Code DG = Deluxe 8 cylinder

Code 6WH = Dual side mount tires

 

The only thing left is the original top color.

 

I must admit, I like black with red interior better than green with tan.  The car was going to be stripped anyway, so it will go back to black.

 

Joe

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  • 8 months later...

Joe,

   First, I have two of these car.  I have spent a life time trying to put them back on the road without going broke.

One is running, driveable but unfinished.  These are very unusual cars, in a place of there own. They were obviously the top  of the line Chrysler product, with the exception of the Airflow line.  A better product than the Dodge,  Plymouth, or Desoto.  They had several very unusual one make, one model year, only components and differences, that you will find are made of unabtanium.  This makes them  unrestorable, if you are on a limited budget.  The value of these cars are likely never to be anything spectacular, therefore total restoration is not likely to be money well spent.  One of the worst things you can do to this car is take it apart and be over your head in work, funds, and info.  I highly suggest you carefully consider what you are doing to this car.  You may do a lot more damage than good, like so many other people do.  There's nothing worst you can to a car, than  take it apart and disperse all the parts, with the except of burning it to the ground.

 

At this stage I am putting my cars back together and driving them.     I highly suggest you carefully consider what a total restoration is going to do to this car, your capabilities, funding, etc. , before you end up like so many basket cases.

Hopefully I'm not to late  with this note..]

Best wishes to you and the car..

 

ERIC

 

 

 

Edited by VW4X4 (see edit history)
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On 8/17/2021 at 11:43 AM, VW4X4 said:

Thanks for the guidance Eric.  I think you may misunderstand my intentions for this car.  I am restoring it back to as original as I can make it.  Most of the parts are original, and the parts I am missing I can either fabricate, have fabricated, or find.  I do what I call “driving restorations” on my cars.  Typically I rebuild all of the necessary mechanical systems, followed by the interior and electrical systems, then paint.  This is not a particularly efficient way to restore a car, but I want to drive my cars while I restore them.  I have been without my car for about three months while the interior is being restored.  When it comes back, I will drive it for awhile, remove the engine and rebuild it and while I am rebuilding it, I will send the body off for restoration and paint.  I uploaded some images of the interior being restored in the introduction thread to my car.  Take a look when you get a chance.

Best,

 

Joe

On 8/17/2021 at 11:43 AM, VW4X4 said:

 

 

 

 

Joe,

   First, I have two of these car.  I have spent a life time trying to put them back on the road without going broke.

One is running, driveable but unfinished.  These are very unusual cars, in a place of there own. They were obviously the top  of the line Chrysler product, with the exception of the Airflow line.  A better product than the Dodge,  Plymouth, or Desoto.  They had several very unusual one make, one model year, only components and differences, that you will find are made of unabtanium.  This makes them  unrestorable, if you are on a limited budget.  The value of these cars are likely never to be anything spectacular, therefore total restoration is not likely to be money well spent.  One of the worst things you can do to this car is take it apart and be over your head in work, funds, and info.  I highly suggest you carefully consider what you are doing to this car.  You may do a lot more damage than good, like so many other people do.  There's nothing worst you can to a car, than  take it apart and disperse all the parts, with the except of burning it to the ground.

 

At this stage I am putting my cars back together and driving them.     I highly suggest you carefully consider what a total restoration is going to do to this car, your capabilities, funding, etc. , before you end up like so many basket cases.

Hopefully I'm not to late  with this note..]

Best wishes to you and the car..

 

ERIC

 

 

 

 

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Yes, I fully understand what you are doing.  I've seen this to many times. What you and many others end up with is an over restored car that many or many not be really what you wanted in the first place.   I've made this mistake myself.  Keeping it on the road, and original as possible is what I strive for.  BUT The word "original" and "restored" has taken on new means with a lot of the car enthusiasts these days.  Most see the fade paint, the lack of shiny chrome, and some dirt as a bad thing.  To me and many other well seasoned automotive people, this is what REAL original condition is.  Lightly clean up and  just out of the barn.  I guaranty you this car world have attracted more attention from the experts this way.   Well, the damage has been done to the interior. My cars  has REAL original interior, even with some dirt and rips.  MY sedan still has most of the original paint, and will stay that way.   Your car is no longer original.  Its only a close second to what the interior shop can fudge though and made you think its correct.  May look "new" , but I'm sure not the way it came from the factory.  Sorry, but cars like this are so rare.  To see them fall into the wrong hand really should never happen.

 

ERIC

 

Edited by VW4X4 (see edit history)
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Thanks Eric. The interior that was in the car was redone in Naugahyde and the wrong color.  No matter what I did, the interior would never be original. Top material was replaced at the same time as the interior, and it was dry rotted. My new top was made from the original pattern, but is the wrong material although it looks close to correct. 
 

with respect to over restored, i want the car to look as correct as I can make it.  I do all the work I can, and pay for work I cannot do myself. With respect to costs, money is not a factor. I will make this car as perfect as I can and the drive it until I drop. 🙂

 

Thanks so much for all your feedback Eric. I appreciate it. 
 

Joe

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Just to see if anyone has any more info. that can help identify the Chrysler Airstream model tags,  here is one of mine.  This car was originally black. The interior looked to be a mohair grey green, 6 cly., overdrive transmission.  Any help would be appreciated.

 

ERIC

DSCF2455.JPG

Edited by VW4X4 (see edit history)
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