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avgwarhawk
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I was told by my mechanic this week that 160 or 180 does not make a lot of difference BUT he did say the better thermostats these days have a little hole drilled in them to allow a gradual flow of water rather than a burst on opening.  He said he would drill a hole in mine if it did not have one in the Superstat.  He's got it on a dyno right now!

 

 

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The difference in the two  temps makes a difference in that winter driving the heater will warm the cabin better.  Also, the hotter the motor the more efficient it will be. I have seen stats with bleed holes but these were designed to bleed air from the system. Was not so much a slow release of coolant into the system.  The superstat has a heavier duty spring that opens slowly with more control as claimed, but also provides a larger opening.

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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The reason for thermostats was simple......to prevent oil sludge accumulation. Back in the day oil would stick to the inside of the engine looking like you blew insulation into it. It would cake up that bad. As oil improved there was much less reason to have a thermostat, and then hot water heaters became more common with the introduction of antifreeze. Since the 50’s better fuel required warmer operating temperatures.......and then add in the clean air act.....and that’s when you see cars starting to operate at 205-210 degrees. 

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18 hours ago, Dan O said:

I was told by my mechanic this week that 160 or 180 does not make a lot of difference BUT he did say the better thermostats these days have a little hole drilled in them to allow a gradual flow of water rather than a burst on opening.  He said he would drill a hole in mine if it did not have one in the Superstat.  He's got it on a dyno right now!

 

 

 

 Must be a youngish mechanic.

 

  Ben

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1 minute ago, Bloo said:

That hole is to let the coolant fill up to the thermostat so the engine doesn't have to overheat to "burp" when it first runs with new coolant. Sometimes it's a little check valve instead of a hole.

That's what I have known these small holes are for. 

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On 7/2/2020 at 1:00 PM, avgwarhawk said:

No response.  Well, I installed a Stant Superstat high flow 180.  I have not put any miles on it to report if it works better than the standard 180 thermostat.  I will let you know!   

I hope you have a fantastic report.  The thermostats that I have been using work as designed, but (and it may be some other problem with the cooling system design) my factory air cars do not like speeds faster than 65mph if the outside temperature is above 95*.

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Old-tank:

Your 55 Buick’s probably have a generator so you are doing very well with AC on these beauties.   Sixty- five mph is a good speed given you have drum brakes on your 4000 pound cars. 

Can’t think of why 65 mph creates a problem for your cars.  

Happy 4th of July to all!

Joe

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2 hours ago, old-tank said:

I hope you have a fantastic report.  The thermostats that I have been using work as designed, but (and it may be some other problem with the cooling system design) my factory air cars do not like speeds faster than 65mph if the outside temperature is above 95*.

 

I'll keep you posted. 

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10 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

 

 Must be a youngish mechanic.

 

  Ben

Ben - not young, perhaps even older than you!  But I probably mis-quoted him on the purpose of the hole in the thermostat. 

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4 hours ago, Dan O said:

Ben - not young, perhaps even older than you!  But I probably mis-quoted him on the purpose of the hole in the thermostat. 

 

 If he is older than me he is ancient. I am 83.

 

  I would never run an engine cooler than 180. I run a 195 as is in my straight eight.

 

  Ben

 

 

  Ben

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On 7/5/2020 at 11:35 AM, old-tank said:

I hope you have a fantastic report.  The thermostats that I have been using work as designed, but (and it may be some other problem with the cooling system design) my factory air cars do not like speeds faster than 65mph if the outside temperature is above 95*.

 

Willie, I can not detect much of a difference if any.  The temp gauge to me is more of a "suggested" temp at the current driving conditions.  The needle did still climb at highway speeds but did not continue to climb as I have experienced with the standard stat.  I was rolling at 70 mph. 85 degrees.  At a stop with engine at idle the needle climbed to the top of the white normal line.  She did the same with my standard 180 stat. No change there.  When I returned to the garage I let her run until the needle went to the top of the normal range.  Using a infa-red temp tester at idle with the needle at the high range of normal the temp at the stat housing 202 degrees.  Head at the port for the temp gauge probe 180 degrees.  Overall, not much of a difference.  However, I'm glad to note when at a light or stop/go traffic, the needle at the high side of normal she is at 202 degrees or there about. The temp never climbed any higher. 

 

Picture at idle and just pulled into the garage. Driving at city street speed the needle is over the N.  At highway speeds this is the position she will climb.  Did not go any further. Guesstimating she is running at 190 degrees at 70 mph.  85 degrees today. 

 

IMG_20200709_121955.jpg

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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On 7/5/2020 at 11:35 AM, old-tank said:

I hope you have a fantastic report.  The thermostats that I have been using work as designed, but (and it may be some other problem with the cooling system design) my factory air cars do not like speeds faster than 65mph if the outside temperature is above 95*.

Willie,

 

Second look.  I drained the radiator and block. It was time.  No flush. Added new green coolant recommend for our older cars. 50/50 mix.  She ran steady temp at 40-50 mph. Climbed a bit at 65 but climbed no more. Needle returned to position at off highway speeds.  At idle the needle did not climb to the top of normal. Although the superstat and new coolant did not show significant changes it did offer more steady predictable cooling as indicated by the temp needle. The infrared temp meter shows 202 at the t-stat housing, at idle, and temp needle at the high end if normal as indicated on the gauge. I'm still of the opinion that our gauge set up is a "suggested" temp. Although the needle is heading to the H and in the normal range  it's still running well under boiling point. Your AC unit is no doubt working hard and making some significant heat at 65 mph. Question is, what is the true temp of the cooling system at those speeds?  Our basic temp gauges we will never know. Maybe next time your are in that situation attempt to get a reading with a infrared temp gun.

 

As a side note, I'm not so sure the temp probe in the head is the best spot. Today's cars the port to the coolant is usually somewhere near the t-stat housing.  

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